Movie City Indie Archive for April, 2011

Picturing “Illuminating The Shadows” Film Critic Conference, April 21-23

You Should Read One Of Us

Illuminating the Shadows: Film Criticism In Focus” was the subject of a conference April 21-23, Easter weekend, at the Block Museum of Art on the Northwestern University Evanston campus. Four panels were accompanied by four screenings, including Michael Phillips‘ choice of Errol Morris’ Tabloid; Dave Kehr‘s presentation of “the pre-Codiest of pre-Code” movies, Raoul Walsh’s 1933 three-cannon salute of a carefree sexual romp, Sailor’s Luck; and Karina Longworth with Athina Rachel Tsangari’s Attenberg (my notes here). There aren’t any images here of the panel about this history of film criticism in Chicago that I was part of, but the organizers promise MP3s of the four panels to come. My favorite moment may have come when a film professor type confronted the above panel with the question of why he should read any film criticism at all, what was its purpose, why should he care about anyone’s opinion but his own. To which the Boston Globe’s Wesley Morris essentially replied, “Read one of us.” (His elaboration of how a reviewer’s work can inform the intelligent reader was substantially more nuanced.) To the right of Morris, the Chicago Tribune’s Michael Phillips; The AV Club’s Scott Tobias and Ignatiy Vishnevetsky of “Ebert Presents” and Mubi.com. A 52-photo slideshow including these images and others is here; all could bear a bit more color correction to make the assembled seem ever-so-slightly more healthy.

Rosenbaum

Jonathan Rosenbaum.

Flowchart linking Carpenter, DePalma by Vishnevetsky

At dinner, Vishnevetsky crayons his flowchart to connect John Carpenter and Brian De Palma.

Longworth

Karina Longworth of LA Weekly.

Empaneled: "Past Perfect – Critical Histories, Seminal Touchstones, and Rediscoveries"

The Block Museum of Art auditorium during a panel dubbed “Past Perfect–Critical Histories, Seminal Touchstones, and Rediscoveries.” To the left, moderator Nick Davis (Assistant Professor, English and Gender Studies, Northwestern).
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RIP Poly Styrene, 53: O, Cancer, Up Yours

And a brilliant amount of context and testimony from the likes of Johnny Rotten and Billy Bragg in under four minutes:

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HANNA-Inspired Comic Art

Focus Features sends illos along: “The artistic blending of action, mystery, innocence and coming of age in Hanna inspired the Illustration Project. Focus Features set out to find three talented artists internationally who could capture the spirit of the characters and bring them to life in their own mediums. Working with exclusive clips, photo stills and the film’s original score by the Chemical Brothers, the artists created and illustrated Hanna’s world through their eyes. The artists Jock, Aaron Minier and Alan Brooks were given little to no direction when they took on this assignment—only materials. This is their art, and their vision, of Hanna.” [Above, Brooks; below, three by Jock. Click twice for larger images. Also: two stills from Hanna illustrating Wright’s comics-ish visual style



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“They’re Paying For It, You Eat It”

[Via Remember Me.]

50 Years of The Wilhelm Scream in 12 Minutes

[Via Cinexcellence.]

Trailering Luc Moullet’s Latest, TOUJOURS MOINS

Writes Daniel Kasman at Mubi: “A short film suspiciously formed of footage of automated terminals (ATMs, ticket dispensers, turnstiles, etc.) over three decades (perhaps culled from the director’s own work?), with customary pith and concision picks up, toys with, and… finally drops, the many ways human interaction has been eliminated in favor of blocky mechanical interfaces… The self-evident quality of Moullet’s humorist-material record is absolutely in accordance with the filmmaker’s style of matter-of-fact direct presentation…. What Moullet gets… is something so few filmmakers understand, that approaching something as if it has never been filmed and revealed to audiences before has the power to transform the everyday into something… revelatory.” [Via Andy Rector.]

Silent Footage Of Fukushima Wreckage As Peeped By Robot Drone

Dimming Tokyo In Time-Lapse Video

“Hotel,” by Alan Rudolph

More paintings here. Click for larger version.

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Trailering Azazel Jacobs’ TERRI

A Lovely Trailer For ANOTHER EARTH

Someone’s even picked the right shots, let alone hit the right notes.

Postering Nash Edgerton’s BEAR

The short sequel to his short Spider. Written by Edgerton & David Michôd. Key art from the talented Jeremy Saunders (@jeremyrsaunders).

Tim Hetherington’s SLEEPING SOLDIERS

“he work was made in 2007-8 while I was following a platoon of US Airborne Infantry based in the Korengal Valley of Eastern Afghanistan. This is a single screen version of the original 3-screen installation that was first shown in New York in 2009 (the original 3-screen version was designed as an immerisve installation, and not for the small screen).”

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Movie City Indie

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“Would I like to see Wormwood in a theater on a big screen? You betcha. I’d be disingenuous to argue otherwise. But we’re all part of, like it or not, an industry, and what Netflix offers is an opportunity to do different kinds of films in different ways. Maybe part of what is being sacrificed is that they no longer go into theaters. If the choice is between not doing it at all and having it not go to theaters, it’s an easy choice to make.”
~ Errol Morris

“As these stories continue to break, in the weeks since women have said they were harassed and abused by Harvey Weinstein, which was not the birth of a movement but an easy and highly visible shorthand for decades of organizing against sexual harassment that preceded this moment, I hope to gain back my time, my work. Lately, though, I have noticed a drift in the discourse from violated rights to violated feelings: the swelled number of reporters on the beat, the burden on each woman’s story to concern a man “important” enough to report on, the detailed accounting of hotel robes and incriminating texts along with a careful description of what was grabbed, who exposed what, and how many times. What I remember most, from “my story” is how small the sex talk felt, almost dull. I did not feel hurt. I had no pain to confess in public. As more stories come out, I like to think that we would also believe a woman who said, for example, that the sight of the penis of the man who promised her work did not wound her, and that the loss she felt was not some loss of herself but of her time, energy, power.”
~ “The Unsexy Truth About Harassment,” by Melissa Gira Grant