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Movie City Indie Archive for April, 2011

Animated: “Stanley Kubrick: A Filmography”

Gentle. Bittersweet.

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Chuck Jones’ “Crawford” On Marriage

[Via Cartoon Brew.]

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Teasing Takashi Miike’s Cannes-Bound 3D HARA-KIRI: DEATH OF A SAMURAI (Ichimei)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmeMHi1MQAs&feature=player_embedded

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Postering “Jane Campion presents SLEEPING BEAUTY”

Julia Leigh on the making of her debut feature. [Click several times for the largest scale.]
Read the full article »

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TRANSFORMERS 3: Great Chicago Fire For The 21st Century?

A Great Chicago Fire for the 21st century? A Chicagoan can only hope.

Beautiful waterfront…

The gorgeous green of the Chicago River…

And with only a couple more weeks of Mayor Daley in office, it’s about time we got rid of the terrible concrete planters choking traffic medians in the more moneyed neighborhoods.

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MIKE MILLS MEETS A LOT OF PEOPLE

He’s Beginnering to blog his festival and press tour for the summer release of Beginners.

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Hal Hartley “Blogs” In The Form Of A “Screenplay”





























INTERIOR, BISTRO, LOWER MANHATTAN.

Hal Hartley (early-fifties, laid-back but troubled) sits and frowns at a page deep in the middle of Roberto Bolano’s The Savage Detectives. He turns over a page, finishes a chapter, and removes his reading glasses. He contemplates his double espresso. Meanwhile, to his left three casually well-dressed young executives continue a heated discussion…

CHET: It’s outrageous!

LOLA: Let me see.

Chet holds out his mobile device and shows Lola a text message. Their friend, Kurt, paces nearby, scheming distractedly.

CHET: Why text “would you like to meet for drinks at seven?

KURT (stops and turns): Did he spell “seven” or just use a number?

LOLA: He spells it out!

CHET: Now that’s just verbose.

KURT (his suspicions confirmed): Or worse!

LOLA: “Drinks at numeral seven question mark” is like I guess beneath his dignity? Look, he even spells out “at!”

KURT: (fatigued) This is more complicated than I thought.

Hartley decides it’s probably a good time to evaporate. He leaves some bills on the small table and heads for the door with his book. Lola notices him and grabs Chet’s arm…

LOLA: Hey, is that?

CHET: You mean?

LOLA: The guy who made, oh, you know, what’s it called?

KURT: You mean with the girl and the book and the guy from the television repair shop?

LOLA: Something like that. It’s unimportant, really. I was moved, true. But I was young.

In the doorway, Hartley bumps into his publicists, Emily and Roger.

. . .

With more of the same at the link. There, that was simple enough to finance, wasn’t it? While he’s at it, a couple of double-trucks from “The Heart Is A Muscle,” a new Swedish book of photos from his earlier films, available at the link, signed, for $99.95.

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Trailering Hong Sang-Soo’s THE DAY HE ARRIVES

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqR6gr80feI&feature=player_embedded

Just a short part of his new film, 북촌방향, bound for Cannes, or a device throughout? Sweet in a Hong Sang-Soo kind of way…

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Trailering Kim Ki-Duk’s Cannes-Bound ARIRANG

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSN3p9uWNK4&feature=player_embedded

O.S.: A quiet “Oh, dear.” Kim Ki-Duk’s movies have crude and strange things in them, but this… it’s a mystery. And apparently a documentary about his life.

His director’s statement:
Arirang is

about Kim Ki-duk
playing 3 roles in 1.
Through Arirang I climb over one hill in life.
Through Arirang I understand human beings, thank the nature, and accept my life as it is now.

We are now…
in the terrestrial world lurking with desires,
in the ghostly world lurking with sorrow
in the imaginary world lurking with dreams,
with no beginning nor end,
slowly going crazy.

What is affection that it still remains all around me decaying?
It’s still stuck to the crown of my head, testing my emotions.
It’s still hiding deep within my heart, testing my sense of compassion.
If I didn’t give my heart, they would be bad people erased from memories but if I gave my heart, I couldn’t let them go till the day that I die as despicable people.
Ah…
Arirang
Alright
Let’s mercilessly kill each other in our hearts till we die.

Even today
I hold back as I get angry
I laugh as I get jealous
I love as I despise
And forgive as I quiver with the urge to kill.
Wait
I will kill
Myself, who remembers you.”

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Trailering Cannes’ “Jane Campion Presents SLEEPING BEAUTY” [mnsfw]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yskjRo7RXIw&feature=player_embedded

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Raw Tornado Footage From Tuscaloosa And Birmingham

Tuscaloosa “Lord jesus”

Tuscaloosa

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Elmer Lynn Hauldren, Empire Carpet Pitchman, Was 89-588-2300

How do you know when you’ve lived in the Midwest a long, long time? When the news of this man‘s passing brings a tear. Sun-Times obit. (I’m reminded Chicago’s WGN is on cable and satellite around the world, so Lynn’s more widely known than I realized.) Two more below; lots more on YouTube.
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Benicio Del Toro in Conversation with Japanese Director Kaneto Shindo

[Via @janusfilms.]

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David Lynch Sells You His Signature Cup

http://vimeo.com/21939919&feature=player_embedded

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“To be a critic is to be a workaholic. Workaholism is socially conditioned: viewed favourably by exploiters, it’s generally ruinous to a worker’s mental health. When T.S. Eliot said criticism was as inevitable as breathing, he failed to mention that, respiratory problems notwithstanding, breathing is easy. Criticism is reflexive before reflective: to formalise/industrialise an involuntary instinct requires time, effort and discipline. The reason we seek remuneration, as opposed to the self-hatred of being a scab, is because all labour should be waged…

“Criticism, so the cliché by now goes, is dying. None of the panel discussions on its death agony, however—including those in which I’ve formally participated—come at it from the wider perspective that the problem surely needs. They defend the ways in which criticism functions in relation to the industry and to the public, but they fail to contextualise these relationships as defined by ultimately rotten and self-harming imperatives.

“Criticism was a noble profession so long as only a few could practice it for money; when the field expands, as it has with a so-called ‘democratisation’ of our practice, those few lose their political power. Competition grows and markets are undercut: publications are naturally going to start paying less. Precarity is both cause and effect of a surplus workforce: the reason you’re only as good as your last article is because there are plenty of other folks who can write the next one in your place. The daily grind is: pitch, or perish.

B”ut criticism, so a counter-cliché goes, is not dying. An irony: this is an elite sport that is no longer elite in terms of who is able to practice it, but in economic terms it’s clutching to a perverse and outmoded hierarchical structure. It’s more meritocratic than ever, now: which is to say it isn’t meritocratic at all. That’s a paradox in bad need of a resolution…”

~ Michael Pattison Manifestoes Film Criticism

“It’s easy to forget when you’re reading a critic every single week or multiple times a week, that most of us who do this job, and have been doing it for a long time, understand that this is basically a parasitic profession. I don’t mean in the sense that we’re evil bloodsucking creatures, but we couldn’t exist if we didn’t have something to analyze. And I’m always conscious of that. So whether I like or don’t like a particular thing you do, my point of view is always that of an appreciator. I just like to be in the world that you create.”
~ Matt Zoller Seitz To Sam Esmail

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