Movie City Indie Archive for February, 2011

The Selected Jane Russell From Howard Hughes’ THE OUTLAW

And from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
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Annie Girardot in ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BySmN6t5ezs&feature=player_embedded

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Charlie Sheen in FERRIS BUELLER: At The Station For Drugs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRbzZG_JxYY&feature=player_embedded

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Happy 103, Tex Avery

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlgHalJ1-p4&feature=player_embedded

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Banksy’s L.A.test Outdoor Art

[Click for larger. Via.]

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Trailering “Shaun Of The Dead Island”

Nice music! Where’s that from?

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Chris Marker’s TEMPO RISOLUTO

From the “Kosinski”/”Guillaume” YouTube account, montage on revolt in Middle East and Northern Africa.

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Happy 111, Luis Buñuel

“God, death, sex, dry martini, dreams.”

From “My Last Sigh,” Don Luis’ recipe for the very dry Virgin Martini. “To provoke, or sustain, a reverie in a bar, you have to drink English gin, especially in the form of the dry martini. To be frank, given the primordial role played in my life by the dry martini, I think I really ought to give it at least a page. Like all cocktails, the martini, composed essentially of gin and a few drops of Noilly Prat, seems to have been an American invention. Connoisseurs who like their martinis very dry suggest simply allowing a ray of sunlight to shine through a bottle of Noilly Prat before it hits the bottle of gin. At a certain period in America it was said that the making of a dry martini should resemble the Immaculate Conception, for, as Saint Thomas Aquinas once noted, the generative power of the Holy Ghost pierced the Virgin’s hymen “like a ray of sunlight through a window — leaving it unbroken.”

Another crucial recommendation is that the ice be so cold and hard that it won’t melt, since nothing’s worse than a watery martini. For those who are still with me, let me give you my personal recipe, the fruit of long experimentation and guaranteed to produce perfect results. The day before your guests arrive, put all the ingredients — glasses, gin, and shaker — in the refrigerator. Use a thermometer to make sure the ice is about twenty degrees below zero (centigrade). Don’t take anything out until your friends arrive; then pour a few drops of Noilly Prat and half a demitasse spoon of Angostura bitters over the ice. Shake it, then pour it out, keeping only the ice, which retains a faint taste of both. Then pour straight gin over the ice, shake it again, and serve. (During the 1940s, the director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York taught me a curious variation. Instead of Angostura, he used a dash of Pernod. Frankly, it seemed heretical to me, but apparently it was only a fad.)”

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Sofia Directs Natalie For Dior

Via Russian Tatler, with more stills from the shoot of Coppola’s commercial with Portman and photographer Tim Walker at the link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yCw6Mvh69A&feature=player_embedded

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Michael Kahn’s A.C.E. Lifetime Achievement Tribute Reel

As shown at Saturday night’s American Cinema Editors awards. Edited by Carsten Kurpanek & Rosanne Colello.  Via Edgar Wright.

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SxSW: Teasing Aussie Ha’penny Indie LBF: A POP-ART FILM

http://vimeo.com/14550093&feature=player_embedded

Based on the 2006 novel, “Life Between Fucks,”  by “Cry Bloxsome,” made over a period of months for under $25,000, according to the makers. A hot Australian summer… [Site.]

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MNSFW: Trailering “Dead Island”

Yes, I now have an idea about the texture and mood of this game. Even beyond the great gushing geyers of grue. Wonder how much story there was to draw on for a terrific trailer like this.

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Radiohead’s “Lotus Flower,” By Garth Jennings

Gosh. I mean, gosh. Goofy goofy beauty. The NME offers inventive explanations for Mr. Yorke’s moves.

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Movie City Indie

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Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

“Which is all for the good. But what’s happened in the interim is that theatrical movies being a spectacle business are now either giant blockbuster movies that run three hours—even superhero movies run three hours, they used to run like 58 minutes!—and the others, which are dysfunctional family independent movies or the slob comedy or the kiddie movie, and those are all low-budget. So the middle ground of movies that were about things, they’re just gone. Or else they’re on HBO. Like the Bryan Cranston LBJ movie, which years ago would’ve been made for theaters.

“You’ve got people like Paul Schrader and Walter Hill who can’t get their movies theatrically distributed because there’s no market for it. So they end up going to VOD, and VOD is a model from which no one makes any money, because most of the time, as soon as they get on the site, they’re pirated. So the whole model of the system right now is completely broken. And whether or not anybody’s going to try to fix, or if it even can be fixed, I don’t know. But it’s certainly not the same business that I got into in the ’70s.”
~ Joe Dante

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