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Movie City Indie Archive for January, 2011

Black Swan’s VFX Reel

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Postering HANNA (She Seems Nice)

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Skeptic

Skeptic

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Is there really a movie called I MELT WITH YOU?

So there really is a movie by Mark Pellington called I Melt With You? (Yes, it’s not just a series of videos!)

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Sasha Gray from I MELT WITH YOU

The YouTube skin police get wind of the NSFW version of this modest mouse. Here’s the SFW edition. From Mark Pellington’s Sundance-premiering I Melt With You.

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Live@Sundance Opening Presser… from a café in Chicago

The first Sundance I’ve attended where I couldn’t make it to opening day, and I’m missing the tradition of the opening presser, where Robert Redford offers his opening invocation of the ideals of Sundance. (All’s missing is thin air and the murmuring of cynical scribes seated nearby.) The work of the Sundance Institute gets described in general terms before the specific results light up the screens for ten days to come. But for 2011, the opening remarks by Robert Redford and new Executive Director of the Institute, Keri Putnam [profile], as well as John Cooper. “It’s great to be in a second year, and not a first year, let me tell you,” Cooper says. “I’m almost relaxed!” “We are live-streaming this, so hello out there!”

Cooper repeats his prediction that it may be one of the most packed festivals in years, but warns that’s anecdotal. “We’re already sold out, but the word on the street, I think, it’s going to be a very big year and maybe very crowded on the streets. I fear that this kind of constant, ongoing situtation of ambush marketers may be back—I like to call them riff-raff. At an event of this size, that is to be expected. I wish they could find a way to contribute to independent film in generral, but I have to keep looking at the sponsors who support this festival and the year-round stuff that we do.” The magic happens in the theaters, he added, “because that’s what we do.” Cooper also adds that for 2011, the festival received over 10,000 submissions.

“Mr Redford, you’re in your 70s, any plans of retiring?” a woman asks and Cooper bolts from the stage. “Who are you?” he laughs. Redford says, “I think you’ve just given me a great idea! I have not thought about retiring. I’m going to die,” he says, laughing, “but I haven’t thought about retiring.”





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It’s Christian McKay’s Happening And It’s Freaking Him Out

From Mark Pellington’s I Melt With You.

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Kevin Smith Does Not Want The Press Writing About RED STATE…

… but a press release presumes he wants publicity?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

THE HARVEY BOYS WILL PICKET THE WESTBORO BAPTIST CHURCH PICKET OF THE SCREENING OF “RED STATE” AT THE ECCLES THEATRE, SUNDAY, JANUARY 23

Picket 6:00 – 6:30 PM Screening of “Red State”

@thatkevinsmith – January 19, 2011 Here are the facts: (1) The Westboro Baptist Church are haters of Biblical proportions! “Thou shalt not hate thy brother in thine heart: thou shalt in any wise rebuke thy neighbour, & not suffer sin upon him.” (Lev 19:17) (2) The WBC’s punishment in Hell for their hatred will be administered by the very Jesus they blaspheme daily. “…he shall be tormented with fire & brimstone in the presence of the holy angels, & in the presence of the Lamb: & the smoke of their torment ascendeth up forever & ever: & they have no rest day nor night.” (Rev 14:10-11)

The Harvey Boys are seeking the aid of the Mighty Thor, hoping he’ll lay down his hammer and instead pick up a protest sign on our behalf, in a Park City battle of the mega-gods! If he’s in reshoots, we’ll be reaching out to Sigourney Weaver to channel Zuul on our behalf. If she’s not at Sundance this year, we’ll start praying to Krom. And if you don’t help us, Krom? Then to hell witchoo.

For thirty minutes of fun-filled photo-opportunities, the Harvey Boys will peacefully counter-protest the WBC Eccles Theater Protest. All are welcome. Wear YOUR dopey sentiments nobody gives a s— about on a sign of your own making, as you stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the folks who’ve mastered the art of writing utter horseshit on cardboard! BYOS (Bring Your Own Sign)

The scoffing and the mocking will begin sharply at 6pm. Remember: this is a PEACEFUL protest. The only venom you bring is printed on a placard, your only weapon: wit.

“Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness…” (Isa 5:20)

GOD DOESN’T HATE F–S OR
ANYBODY ELSE FOR THAT MATTER.
GOD SAVES! THEN, GOD PASSES IT
TO GRETZKY – WHO ROOFS THAT
S—, TOP-SHELF! THEN GOD AND
GRETZKY HIGH FIVE & BELLY-BUMP,
CELEBRATING THEIR HOCKEY
PROWESS. AND NEVER ONCE DO
THEY GIVE A S— IF ANYBODY’S
GAY OR NOT.

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It’s Thomas Jane’s Turn In I MELT WITH YOU

From Mark Pellington’s Sundance-premiering I Melt With You.

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It Gets Icy In Pittsburgh, At Least On This Hill

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7O3abzX298&feature=player_embedded

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Opening Ebert Presents Lemire-Vishnevetsky At The Movies

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Teasing I MELT WITH YOU (Piven Edition)

From Mark Pellington’s Sundance-premiering I Melt With You.

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Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Address

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Teasing Sundance-Bound I MELT WITH YOU

From Mark Pellington’s Sundance-premiering I Melt With You.

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We’re Young And We’re Dancing

[Via Fox Searchlight Twitter.]

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Movie City Indie

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MAMET
Well, that, to me, is always the trick of dramaturgy; theoretically, perfectly, what one wants to do is put the protagonist and the audience in exactly the same position. The main question in drama, the way I was taught, is always what does the protagonist want. That’s what drama is. It comes down to that. It’s not about theme, it’s not about ideas, it’s not about setting, but what the protagonist wants. What gives rise to the drama, what is the precipitating event, and how, at the end of the play, do we see that event culminated? Do we see the protagonist’s wishes fulfilled or absolutely frustrated? That’s the structure of drama. You break it down into three acts.

INTERVIEWER
Does this explain why your plays have so little exposition?

MAMET
Yes. People only speak to get something. If I say, Let me tell you a few things about myself, already your defenses go up; you go, Look, I wonder what he wants from me, because no one ever speaks except to obtain an objective. That’s the only reason anyone ever opens their mouth, onstage or offstage. They may use a language that seems revealing, but if so, it’s just coincidence, because what they’re trying to do is accomplish an objective… The question is where does the dramatist have to lead you? Answer: the place where he or she thinks the audience needs to be led. But what does the character think? Does the character need to convey that information? If the answer is no, then you’d better cut it out, because you aren’t putting the audience in the same position with the protagonist. You’re saying, in effect, Let’s stop the play. That’s what the narration is doing—stopping the play… It’s action, as Aristotle said. That’s all that it is—exactly what the person does. It’s not what they “think,” because we don’t know what they think. It’s not what they say. It’s what they do, what they’re physically trying to accomplish on the stage. Which is exactly the same way we understand a person’s character in life—not by what they say, but by what they do. Say someone came up to you and said, I’m glad to be your neighbor because I’m a very honest man. That’s my character. I’m honest, I like to do things, I’m forthright, I like to be clear about everything, I like to be concise. Well, you really don’t know anything about that guy’s character. Or the person is onstage, and the playwright has him or her make those same claims in several subtle or not-so-subtle ways, the audience will say, Oh yes, I understand their character now; now I understand that they are a character. But in fact you don’t understand anything. You just understand that they’re jabbering to try to convince you of something.
~ David Mamet

INTERVIEWER
Do you outline plays before you start to write them?

PINTER
Not at all. I don’t know what kind of characters my plays will have until they…well, until they are. Until they indicate to me what they are. I don’t conceptualize in any way. Once I’ve got the clues I follow them—that’s my job, really, to follow the clues.

INTERVIEWER
What do you mean by clues? Can you remember how one of your plays developed in your mind—or was it a line-by-line progression?

PINTER
Of course I can’t remember exactly how a given play developed in my mind. I think what happens is that I write in a very high state of excitement and frustration. I follow what I see on the paper in front of me—one sentence after another. That doesn’t mean I don’t have a dim, possible overall idea—the image that starts off doesn’t just engender what happens immediately, it engenders the possibility of an overall happening, which carries me through. I’ve got an idea of what might happen—sometimes I’m absolutely right, but on many occasions I’ve been proved wrong by what does actually happen. Sometimes I’m going along and I find myself writing “C. comes in” when I didn’t know that he was going to come in; he had to come in at that point, that’s all.
~ Harold Pinter

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