Movie City Indie Archive for December, 2010

Calligraphing the new Wong Kar-Wai

So that’s what his swordplay pic’s about.

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Did Anyone Tell Ira Glass?

Was looking for examples of  great poster art from 2010, and found THIS not-so-subtle Italian retitling of the Dave Eggers-Vendela Vida-Sam Mendes Away We Go.

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Let It Snow: A Blizzard Symphony [UPDATED JAN 3]

An overnight drift, saluted by Roger Ebert, explained by filmmaker Jamie Stuart. [Stuart’s video went viral after Ebert’s oomph; he’s added a link to the press his sifty symphony has gotten—print, online and broadcast—here.]

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Terry Gilliam’s 1884 Animation Test

To be produced by Mr. Gilliam and directed by Tim Ollive. [Via Cory Doctorow.]

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SANTA AND THE ICE CREAM BUNNY

This seems… scary. A much more entertaining, exploitation-style newspaper ad from the 1972 release BELOW.

Read the full article »

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Teasing Kevin Smith’s Sundance-Debuting Horror, RED STATE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K-4aLeGWF4&feature=player_embedded

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WTF FTW: Trailering Hanna

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRUx88vRjIk&feature=player_embedded

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A Fine Sundance-Bound Poster

David Lowery, whose St. Nick is very fine, posts this Sundance-bound poster. Here’s hoping the film is as fine. A story is offered at the link.

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A Conversation With Paul Greengrass

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A Well-Loved Christmas Tradition

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I Know What You Did Last Year At Marienbad

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The Inception of Movie Editing: The Art of D. W. Griffith

A video essay by Michael Joshua Rowin and Kevin B. Lee. Worth it for a glimpse of a tinted Intolerance backed by Hans Zimmer’s Inception score as well as its punchline.  Text. [Via Matt Zoller Seitz (@mattzollerseitz).]

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One Minkey and Many Birdie Num-Nums: Blake Edwards Was 88

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“By the time the draft was completed, and passed on to my frequent collaborator, director Kathryn Bigelow, I’d written something quite unlike the singular focus and sole protagonists of The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty. The effort to make Detroit a mirror of the chaotic times led to an ensemble piece, quickly shifting between characters in a nesting doll of movies within movies, a riot film that gives way to racial horror-crime that switches to a courtroom drama, with several detours along the way into a band’s journey, the miseducation of rookie cops and the adventures of a pair of young women experimenting with sexual freedom. It was, in short, a lot of ground to cover in a single picture. But Kathryn was encouraging, and over the proceeding draft we collaborated closely to hone the themes and scope, while attempting to keep alive the spirit of a tough and untamed narrative.”
~ Mark Boal on researching and writing Detroit

What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997