Movie City Indie Archive for December, 2010

Calligraphing the new Wong Kar-Wai

So that’s what his swordplay pic’s about.

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Did Anyone Tell Ira Glass?

Was looking for examples of  great poster art from 2010, and found THIS not-so-subtle Italian retitling of the Dave Eggers-Vendela Vida-Sam Mendes Away We Go.

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Let It Snow: A Blizzard Symphony [UPDATED JAN 3]

An overnight drift, saluted by Roger Ebert, explained by filmmaker Jamie Stuart. [Stuart’s video went viral after Ebert’s oomph; he’s added a link to the press his sifty symphony has gotten—print, online and broadcast—here.]

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Terry Gilliam’s 1884 Animation Test

To be produced by Mr. Gilliam and directed by Tim Ollive. [Via Cory Doctorow.]

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SANTA AND THE ICE CREAM BUNNY

This seems… scary. A much more entertaining, exploitation-style newspaper ad from the 1972 release BELOW.

Read the full article »

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Teasing Kevin Smith’s Sundance-Debuting Horror, RED STATE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K-4aLeGWF4&feature=player_embedded

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WTF FTW: Trailering Hanna

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRUx88vRjIk&feature=player_embedded

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A Fine Sundance-Bound Poster

David Lowery, whose St. Nick is very fine, posts this Sundance-bound poster. Here’s hoping the film is as fine. A story is offered at the link.

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A Conversation With Paul Greengrass

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A Well-Loved Christmas Tradition

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I Know What You Did Last Year At Marienbad

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The Inception of Movie Editing: The Art of D. W. Griffith

A video essay by Michael Joshua Rowin and Kevin B. Lee. Worth it for a glimpse of a tinted Intolerance backed by Hans Zimmer’s Inception score as well as its punchline.  Text. [Via Matt Zoller Seitz (@mattzollerseitz).]

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One Minkey and Many Birdie Num-Nums: Blake Edwards Was 88

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Movie City Indie

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“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick