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Movie City Indie Archive for December, 2010

Calligraphing the new Wong Kar-Wai

So that’s what his swordplay pic’s about.

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Did Anyone Tell Ira Glass?

Was looking for examples of  great poster art from 2010, and found THIS not-so-subtle Italian retitling of the Dave Eggers-Vendela Vida-Sam Mendes Away We Go.

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Let It Snow: A Blizzard Symphony [UPDATED JAN 3]

An overnight drift, saluted by Roger Ebert, explained by filmmaker Jamie Stuart. [Stuart’s video went viral after Ebert’s oomph; he’s added a link to the press his sifty symphony has gotten—print, online and broadcast—here.]

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Terry Gilliam’s 1884 Animation Test

To be produced by Mr. Gilliam and directed by Tim Ollive. [Via Cory Doctorow.]

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SANTA AND THE ICE CREAM BUNNY

This seems… scary. A much more entertaining, exploitation-style newspaper ad from the 1972 release BELOW.

Read the full article »

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Teasing Kevin Smith’s Sundance-Debuting Horror, RED STATE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K-4aLeGWF4&feature=player_embedded

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WTF FTW: Trailering Hanna

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRUx88vRjIk&feature=player_embedded

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A Fine Sundance-Bound Poster

David Lowery, whose St. Nick is very fine, posts this Sundance-bound poster. Here’s hoping the film is as fine. A story is offered at the link.

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A Conversation With Paul Greengrass

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A Well-Loved Christmas Tradition

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I Know What You Did Last Year At Marienbad

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The Inception of Movie Editing: The Art of D. W. Griffith

A video essay by Michael Joshua Rowin and Kevin B. Lee. Worth it for a glimpse of a tinted Intolerance backed by Hans Zimmer’s Inception score as well as its punchline.  Text. [Via Matt Zoller Seitz (@mattzollerseitz).]

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One Minkey and Many Birdie Num-Nums: Blake Edwards Was 88

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“We don’t defy the laws of physics: There are no flying men or cars in this movie. So it made sense to do it old-school: real vehicles and real human beings in the desert. We shot the movie more or less in continuity, because the cars and the characters get really banged up along the way. The biggest benefit of digital technology for me was that the cameras were smaller and much more agile, so you could put them anywhere. We also spent a huge amount of time on spatial awareness—making sure the viewer could follow the action and understand what was happening. There has to be a strong causal connection from one shot to the next, just the same way that in music, there has to be a connection from one note to the next. Otherwise it’s just noise. Too often, if you just cram a lot of stuff into the frame, you get the illusion of a fast pace. But there’s no coherence. It doesn’t flow. It comes off as headbanging music, and it can be exhausting. We storyboarded the movie before we had a script: We had 3,500 boards, which helps the cast and crew understand how everything is going to fit together. Movies are getting faster and faster. The Road Warrior had 1,200 cuts. This one has 2,700 cuts. You have to treat it like a symphony.”
~ George Miller

“I was having issues with my script for It’s All About Love, so I called Ingmar Bergman and we ended up talking about everything but the script. He said, “Well, Festen is a masterpiece, so what are you going to do now?” At that point, I had not decided if I was going to make It’s All About Love, so I answered, “Hmmm, I don’t know. Maybe this, maybe that.” There was just a long pause, and then he said, “You’re fucked.” I said, “Well, how can you know?” “Well, Thomas, you always have to decide your next movie before the movie you’re doing presently opens.” And I said, “Why is that?” “Well, two things can happen. One thing is that you fail, and then you’ll feel scared and humiliated. It’ll get into your head. Second, and even worse, you have success, and then you’ll want more of it, or you’ll want to maintain it. But if you decide on your next film while you’re in the middle of editing, it becomes a very nonchalant choice. And then it’s shorter from the heart to the hand.”
~ Thomas Vinterberg

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