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Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2010

Red light

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Blue light

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Kono dezain wa arimasu ka?!

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The Maysles Brothers' Salesman is on Hulu

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Something from Somewhere


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The last words of Satoshi Kon


A dying artist’s last written thoughts. Excerpt: “Because of the visits by Maruyama-san and my parents, I feel as though I’ve taken a big burden off my shoulders. Lastly, to my wife, about whom I worry the most, but who has been my support until the end. Since that time-left pronouncement, we drowned ourselves in tears together so many times. Every day was brutal for both of us, physically and mentally. There are almost no words for it. But the reason why I was able to survive those difficult days was because of the words that you said to me right after we received the news.
“I’ll be at your side [run with you] until the end.”
True to those words, as though you were leaving my worries in the dust, you skillfully directed the demands and requests that came rushing towards us like a landslide, and quickly learned how to take care of your husband. I was so moved, watching you deal with things so efficiently.
“My wife is awesome.”
No need to keep saying that now, you say? No no. You are even more awesome now than you ever were – I truly feel this. Even after I have died, I believe that you will send Satoshi Kon to the next world with grace. Ever since we got married, I was so wrapped up in “Work, work” that I was only able to spend some time at home after the cancer – such a shame. But you stood close to me, you always understood that I needed to immerse myself in my work, that my talent was there. Thank you.” [More at the link.]

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Tweets of the day, from filmmaker Alejandro Adams

“I get tired of the abundant congratulation of economy in filmmaking. It is a medium of excess, indulgence, profligacy. I want to die of it… When books express awe at how conscientious a director was

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The opening credits of the late Satoshi Kon's Paprika

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Trailering 127 Hours




I do like that pullback upwards, the last proper shot of the until-then sunny trailer for Danny Boyle’s newest.

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"Scott Pilgrim vs. The Matrix"


Mmm… whoa?

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AWE. Some. John Boorman’s "The Matrix"


Walter Hill’s “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger” with Clint Eastwood. Stop! 20 beauties in all here

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It's called… "Inebriation"

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The Last Chatroulette


Born for each other!

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Film criticism as a business operates like the film industry itself: The people in charge like to hire people who remind them of themselves, and those people at the top are by and large straight white dudes (baseball caps are an option). That’s not to say they can’t have wildly diverging opinions on a variety of topics, but privilege comes with blinders that are often hard to acknowledge and even tougher to remove. The past few months have seen some of the most prominent film publications taking on new writers who are for the most part white men: Rolling Stone, Film Comment, Indiewire, and of course, Owen Gleiberman at Variety. Many of them have championed underdog filmmakers, but you can’t get over the sense of gatekeeping going on. Film criticism often feels like the treehouse girls are banned from entering, and it’s not hard to assume the conversations we’re missing out on aren’t exactly centered on women in the business… Our world and our art suffers when we limit the number of perspectives allowed to not only tell the story but to discuss it. Women are no better or worse in their opinions than men, but the key differences we bring allow further dimensions in the narrative. Whether they’re conscious of it or not, the ingrained biases of white maleness will continue unchallenged without contrasting voices under the banner, and the commodification of women’s faces and bodies will exacerbate to increasingly damaging levels.”
~ Ceilidhann

DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

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