Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2010

Red light

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Blue light

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Kono dezain wa arimasu ka?!

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The Maysles Brothers' Salesman is on Hulu

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Something from Somewhere


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The last words of Satoshi Kon


A dying artist’s last written thoughts. Excerpt: “Because of the visits by Maruyama-san and my parents, I feel as though I’ve taken a big burden off my shoulders. Lastly, to my wife, about whom I worry the most, but who has been my support until the end. Since that time-left pronouncement, we drowned ourselves in tears together so many times. Every day was brutal for both of us, physically and mentally. There are almost no words for it. But the reason why I was able to survive those difficult days was because of the words that you said to me right after we received the news.
“I’ll be at your side [run with you] until the end.”
True to those words, as though you were leaving my worries in the dust, you skillfully directed the demands and requests that came rushing towards us like a landslide, and quickly learned how to take care of your husband. I was so moved, watching you deal with things so efficiently.
“My wife is awesome.”
No need to keep saying that now, you say? No no. You are even more awesome now than you ever were – I truly feel this. Even after I have died, I believe that you will send Satoshi Kon to the next world with grace. Ever since we got married, I was so wrapped up in “Work, work” that I was only able to spend some time at home after the cancer – such a shame. But you stood close to me, you always understood that I needed to immerse myself in my work, that my talent was there. Thank you.” [More at the link.]

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Tweets of the day, from filmmaker Alejandro Adams

“I get tired of the abundant congratulation of economy in filmmaking. It is a medium of excess, indulgence, profligacy. I want to die of it… When books express awe at how conscientious a director was

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The opening credits of the late Satoshi Kon's Paprika

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Trailering 127 Hours




I do like that pullback upwards, the last proper shot of the until-then sunny trailer for Danny Boyle’s newest.

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"Scott Pilgrim vs. The Matrix"


Mmm… whoa?

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AWE. Some. John Boorman’s "The Matrix"


Walter Hill’s “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger” with Clint Eastwood. Stop! 20 beauties in all here

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It's called… "Inebriation"

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The Last Chatroulette


Born for each other!

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé