Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2010

Red light

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Blue light

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Kono dezain wa arimasu ka?!

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The Maysles Brothers' Salesman is on Hulu

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Something from Somewhere


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The last words of Satoshi Kon


A dying artist’s last written thoughts. Excerpt: “Because of the visits by Maruyama-san and my parents, I feel as though I’ve taken a big burden off my shoulders. Lastly, to my wife, about whom I worry the most, but who has been my support until the end. Since that time-left pronouncement, we drowned ourselves in tears together so many times. Every day was brutal for both of us, physically and mentally. There are almost no words for it. But the reason why I was able to survive those difficult days was because of the words that you said to me right after we received the news.
“I’ll be at your side [run with you] until the end.”
True to those words, as though you were leaving my worries in the dust, you skillfully directed the demands and requests that came rushing towards us like a landslide, and quickly learned how to take care of your husband. I was so moved, watching you deal with things so efficiently.
“My wife is awesome.”
No need to keep saying that now, you say? No no. You are even more awesome now than you ever were – I truly feel this. Even after I have died, I believe that you will send Satoshi Kon to the next world with grace. Ever since we got married, I was so wrapped up in “Work, work” that I was only able to spend some time at home after the cancer – such a shame. But you stood close to me, you always understood that I needed to immerse myself in my work, that my talent was there. Thank you.” [More at the link.]

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Tweets of the day, from filmmaker Alejandro Adams

“I get tired of the abundant congratulation of economy in filmmaking. It is a medium of excess, indulgence, profligacy. I want to die of it… When books express awe at how conscientious a director was

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The opening credits of the late Satoshi Kon's Paprika

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Trailering 127 Hours




I do like that pullback upwards, the last proper shot of the until-then sunny trailer for Danny Boyle’s newest.

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"Scott Pilgrim vs. The Matrix"


Mmm… whoa?

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AWE. Some. John Boorman’s "The Matrix"


Walter Hill’s “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger” with Clint Eastwood. Stop! 20 beauties in all here

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It's called… "Inebriation"

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The Last Chatroulette


Born for each other!

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch