Movie City Indie Archive for August, 2010

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Kono dezain wa arimasu ka?!

The Maysles Brothers' Salesman is on Hulu

Something from Somewhere


The last words of Satoshi Kon


A dying artist’s last written thoughts. Excerpt: “Because of the visits by Maruyama-san and my parents, I feel as though I’ve taken a big burden off my shoulders. Lastly, to my wife, about whom I worry the most, but who has been my support until the end. Since that time-left pronouncement, we drowned ourselves in tears together so many times. Every day was brutal for both of us, physically and mentally. There are almost no words for it. But the reason why I was able to survive those difficult days was because of the words that you said to me right after we received the news.
“I’ll be at your side [run with you] until the end.”
True to those words, as though you were leaving my worries in the dust, you skillfully directed the demands and requests that came rushing towards us like a landslide, and quickly learned how to take care of your husband. I was so moved, watching you deal with things so efficiently.
“My wife is awesome.”
No need to keep saying that now, you say? No no. You are even more awesome now than you ever were – I truly feel this. Even after I have died, I believe that you will send Satoshi Kon to the next world with grace. Ever since we got married, I was so wrapped up in “Work, work” that I was only able to spend some time at home after the cancer – such a shame. But you stood close to me, you always understood that I needed to immerse myself in my work, that my talent was there. Thank you.” [More at the link.]

Tweets of the day, from filmmaker Alejandro Adams

“I get tired of the abundant congratulation of economy in filmmaking. It is a medium of excess, indulgence, profligacy. I want to die of it… When books express awe at how conscientious a director was

"She Said Yeah," Scorsese's Stones-scored short for Bleu de Chanel

The opening credits of the late Satoshi Kon's Paprika

Trailering 127 Hours




I do like that pullback upwards, the last proper shot of the until-then sunny trailer for Danny Boyle’s newest.

"Scott Pilgrim vs. The Matrix"


Mmm… whoa?

Sam Smyth’s posters for Harmony Korine’s new short


More.

AWE. Some. John Boorman’s "The Matrix"


Walter Hill’s “The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger” with Clint Eastwood. Stop! 20 beauties in all here

It's called… "Inebriation"

The Last Chatroulette


Born for each other!

Movie City Indie

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch