Movie City Indie Archive for June, 2010

Restrepo's Sebastian Junger on the McChrystal matter

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Animating Hitchcock in A McGuffin

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Tilda Swinton's Edinburgh "Laurel & Hardy" flashmob


Just because.

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Oh Canada: and the police advance


This is from a movie, right, not from someone’s window, right? G20, it’s something Belgian, right? Science fiction? Updates at Twitter. Warning: next embed contains sudden violence against a woman with a camera: “muzzle blast,” it’s reportedly called.

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Trailer Jerzy Skolimowski's Essential Killing, with Vincent Gallo


From a 72-year-old director who’s made greats like Deep End and Moonlighting, this looks pleasingly out of left field.

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City in the Garden's got anger in the sky


Chicago’s motto “Urbs in Horto” momentarily “Ira in Divum.”

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Trailering The Social Network


Toggle to “fullscreen” for best results.

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Director-approved: four images from Inception

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Faye Dunaway eats an egg, by Kazumi Kurigami


Bonus: Also for Parco, Gary Numan engages with a prehensile iPad. And Paul Newman goes bird-watching for Maxwell Blendy.

Read the full article »

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Postering Winnebago Man

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Somebody’s done Jack a kindness. [Designer: Kii Arens.]

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Trailering Joel Schumacher's Twelve

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Amir Bar-Lev on The Pat Tillman Story


In the news, considering the involvement of resigned Afghan war commander McChrystal in the aftermath of Tillman’s death.

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The simple style of another "Family Circus"

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It’s not Eno’s Oblique Strategies, but there’s always room for the random wisdom of “Nietzsche Family Circus.”

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé