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Movie City Indie Archive for June, 2010

Restrepo's Sebastian Junger on the McChrystal matter

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Animating Hitchcock in A McGuffin

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Tilda Swinton's Edinburgh "Laurel & Hardy" flashmob


Just because.

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Oh Canada: and the police advance


This is from a movie, right, not from someone’s window, right? G20, it’s something Belgian, right? Science fiction? Updates at Twitter. Warning: next embed contains sudden violence against a woman with a camera: “muzzle blast,” it’s reportedly called.

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Trailer Jerzy Skolimowski's Essential Killing, with Vincent Gallo


From a 72-year-old director who’s made greats like Deep End and Moonlighting, this looks pleasingly out of left field.

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City in the Garden's got anger in the sky


Chicago’s motto “Urbs in Horto” momentarily “Ira in Divum.”

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Trailering The Social Network


Toggle to “fullscreen” for best results.

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Director-approved: four images from Inception

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Faye Dunaway eats an egg, by Kazumi Kurigami


Bonus: Also for Parco, Gary Numan engages with a prehensile iPad. And Paul Newman goes bird-watching for Maxwell Blendy.

Read the full article »

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Postering Winnebago Man

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Somebody’s done Jack a kindness. [Designer: Kii Arens.]

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Trailering Joel Schumacher's Twelve

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Amir Bar-Lev on The Pat Tillman Story


In the news, considering the involvement of resigned Afghan war commander McChrystal in the aftermath of Tillman’s death.

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The simple style of another "Family Circus"

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It’s not Eno’s Oblique Strategies, but there’s always room for the random wisdom of “Nietzsche Family Circus.”

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

“Which is all for the good. But what’s happened in the interim is that theatrical movies being a spectacle business are now either giant blockbuster movies that run three hours—even superhero movies run three hours, they used to run like 58 minutes!—and the others, which are dysfunctional family independent movies or the slob comedy or the kiddie movie, and those are all low-budget. So the middle ground of movies that were about things, they’re just gone. Or else they’re on HBO. Like the Bryan Cranston LBJ movie, which years ago would’ve been made for theaters.

“You’ve got people like Paul Schrader and Walter Hill who can’t get their movies theatrically distributed because there’s no market for it. So they end up going to VOD, and VOD is a model from which no one makes any money, because most of the time, as soon as they get on the site, they’re pirated. So the whole model of the system right now is completely broken. And whether or not anybody’s going to try to fix, or if it even can be fixed, I don’t know. But it’s certainly not the same business that I got into in the ’70s.”
~ Joe Dante

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