Movie City Indie Archive for May, 2010

Dennis Hopper shoots

Untitled 1991 Polaroid.jpg
Selma, Alabama (Full Employment), 1965.jpg
[RIP] Dennis Hopper, Photographer.jpg
hopper_fringeshollywood.jpg

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Dennis Hopper was 74: sweet glimpses

“I mean, what are they going to say, man, when he’s gone? Huh? ‘Cos he dies, when it dies, man… when it dies, he dies, what are they going to say about him? What, are they gonna say he was a kind man, he was a wise man, he had plans, he had wisdom, bullshit man, am I gonna be the one that’s gonna set him straight, look at me! Wrong! You.”




Someday this world’s gonna end.
Below: A scene from Wenders’ The American Friend and Hopper at the opening of his recent Taos show.

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Oh, fern!! Trailering Winnebago Man


And it’s sweet…

IRON BABY

At the inception of (500) Days Of Fatal Attraction: a teaser


Oh show me the way to the next karaoke bar… or surely we must die, surely we must die.

Trailering Bruce McDonald's This Movie Is Broken


Written by Don McKellar and featuring Broken Social Scene; shot entirely across one Toronto day. Details.

Teasering Assayas' Carlos


En français. May roll-out with an ad. Nudity.

Toby Talbott on the New Yorker Theater at The New School


An older video, but new to me.

Sounds familiar….

Twitter parade, from Japan

harch_667.jpgA typo! A link that didn’t work! But now a parade: a way for Twitter users to immediately visualize how many spam accounts are marching in their wake. Insert your Twitter name here. Play loud?

Recreating The Shining elevator of blood in CGI just for fun

David Lynch's Lady Blue Shanghai


Marion Cotillard stars in David Lynch’s Shanghai-set contribution to Dior’s ongoing auteur-driven internet promo shorts. The FT’s Nicola Copping writes, “They called me up and said, ‘Would you like to make a short film for the internet? You can do anything you want, you just need to show the handbag, the Pearl Tower and some old Shanghai.’” For Lynch, it is clear the lines will continue to blur. “This falls between a regular film and a commercial. I liked that idea. There are ads and people get hit hard, and then there is this, where it is like coming at it from a different angle.” … It’s the third “Lady Dior” noir shorts, which all feature Cottilard, and began in May 2009 with Lady Noire, directed by La Vie en Rose‘s Olivier Dahan. “Lynch’s Lady Blue is twelve, enigmatic, weird but wonderful minutes crammed with Lynchian leitmotifs – flashing lights, flashbacks and a haunting soundtrack.”

Chris Markergrams

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One of Chris Marker’s latest projects is breaking Article 9 of the Civil Code by taking taking photographs of other passengers on the Paris Metro. David Thomson says he got The New Republic’s seven-picture portfolio via a mutual friend. “[H]e has been a photographer all his life, and in the last few years he has found a new subject—people on the Paris Metro—shot with a secret camera.” Like Marker’s other photo work dealing with faces and crowds, there’s an empathetic gaze and attention to the found moment; the means raises other questions. Thomson: “When he first started the project, [he] was an elderly gentleman, but still nimble and fit—so he was not often noticed. He may have been 89; he could not always remember… So he used to spend part of his days and nights on the metro. And he had noticed that an elderly gentleman on the metro could sit there with an empty look in his eyes, and under that cover he could gaze upon people and observe them without being detected, or reported as a spy or a Don Juan… [T]he metro… was all silent purpose and bored crusade. These people were all going somewhere. They had a mission, and their loveliness—he thought everyone was lovely in the metro’s white light—was their purpose…” [More prose and six other shots at the link.]

Movie City Indie

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“I always thought that once I had lived in Chicago for a while, it would be interesting to do a portrait of the city – but to do it at a significant time. Figuring out when would be the ideal time to do that was the trick. So when this election came around, coupled with the Laquan McDonald trial, it seemed like the ideal time to do the story. Having lived in Chicagoland for thirty-five-plus years and done a number of films here, I’ve always been struck by the vibrancy of the city and its toughness. Its tenderness too. I’ve always been interested in the people at the center of all the stories. This is a different film in that regard, because we’re not following a couple of individuals over the course of the project in the way that a lot of the films I’ve done have, but I still feel like people’s voices and aspirations and hopes are at the center of this series.

It wasn’t easy. We started back in July 2018, it was actually on the Fourth of July – that was our first shoot. It’s like most documentaries in that the further you go along the more involved and obsessed you get, and you just start shooting more and more and more. We threw ourselves into this crazy year in Chicago. We got up every day and tried to figure out if we should be out shooting or not, and what it is we should shoot. We were trying to balance following this massive political story of the mayor’s race and these significant moments like the Laquan McDonald trial with taking the pulse of people in the city that we encounter along the way and getting a sense of their lives and what it means to live here. By election day, Zak Piper, our producer, had something like six cameras out in the field. You could double-check that, it might have been seven. We had this organized team effort to hit all the candidates as they were voting, if they hadn’t already voted. We hit tons of polling places, were at the Board of Elections and then were at the parties for the candidates that we had been able to follow closely. Then of course, we were trying to make sure we were at the parties of the candidates who made it to the runoff. So, yeah, it was kind of a monster.”
~ Steve James On City So Real

“I really want to see The Irishman. I’ve heard it’s big brother Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece. But I really can’t find the time. The promotion schedule is so tight, there’s no opportunity to see a three and a half-hour movie. But I really want to see it. In 2017, right before Okja’s New York premiere, I had the chance to go to Scorsese’s office, which is in the DGA building. There’s a lovely screening room there, too, with film prints that he’s collected. I talked to him for about an hour. There’s no movie he hasn’t seen, even Korean films. We talked about what he’s seen and his past work. It was a glorious day. I’ve loved his work since I was in college. Who doesn’t? Anyone involved with movies must feel the same way.”
~ Bong Joon-ho