Movie City Indie Archive for March, 2010

Rodarte X Maggie Cheung, by Wing Shya


Wing Shyahas been a photographer on Wong Kar-Wai’s films. There’s lovely stuff at the link. Music by Peter Kam.

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Diesel takes Godard shopping


While Hal Hartley gently weeps. From the YouTube link: “This is a new campaign from Diesel called “A Hundred Lovers” and mixes a cool brand video with a unique shopping experience as part of the larger “be stupid” work on the new Diesel Website.”

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Postering $9.99

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By Jeremy Saunders.

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Butterfly swarms still threaten civilization

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Eva Markvoort, subject of 65_Redroses, was 25

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[Yung Chang, Nimisha Mukerji, Philip Lyall, Eva Markvoort, HotDocs 2009]
65_RedRoses’ Eva Markvoort has died. “A New Westminster woman who became a celebrated cystic fibrosis campaigner died in her Vancouver General Hospital bed of the disease on Saturday (March 27) morning. She was 25. Markvoort was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis as a baby. The former Miss New Westminster and University of Victoria theatre student received a double lung transplant in 2007, but her body wouldn’t accept the donated organs. She was awaiting a second donation when she died. Markvoort brought worldwide attention to the disease while encouraging people to become organ donors through her online journal, 65 Red Roses—a name chosen for how she would mispronounce “cystic fibrosis” as a toddler—as well as an award-winning documentary of the same name made by Vancouver filmmakers Nimisha Mukerji and Philip Lyall. Two days before she died, she wrote in her blog that she was “supersaturated” with drugs and that her doctors were going to try taking her off some of them to see how she would manage. Her final words in a blog post were: “and i am not managing, not managing at all. i’m drowning in the medications. i can’t breathe. every hour, once an hour, i can’t breathe. something has to change.”

Markvoort’s last video. Her LiveJournal. Below: the trailer for the fiercely moving, intimate documentary.

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HBO's 15-minute "Making of 'Treme'"

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Dennis Hopper on "Bad Things" (Nike Comm'l)

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Dennis Hopper on collecting art


Directed and Produced by Kimberly M. Wang.

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Crediting Noe's Enter the Void


[Via Scott Macaulay.]

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Tron vs. Saul Bass


By Hexagonall.

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[PR] Composer John Barry to be honored at Ghent Film Festival

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John Barry to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award at 10th anniversary of World Soundtrack Academy
(Ghent, Belgium) On October 21, 2010 the music of four-time Oscar winner, John Barry will be performed live in concert at the Ghent International Film Festival.The 80 -iece Brussels Philharmonic will perform selections from Barry’s scores including Goldfinger, Mary Queen of Scots, Out of Africa, Dances with Wolves and Midnight Cowboy, conducted by Nicholas Dodd. The concert will be accompanied by a video presentation of film clips. With the John Barry concert, the Ghent Film Festival will be continuing its tradition of showcasing memorable, award-winning film music in the form of live concerts. Previous editions have featured Ennio Morricone, Maurice Jarre, Elmer Bernstein, Hans Zimmer, Howard Shore and Alexandre Desplat. Go here for more information.

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The Internet, seen from 1969


Prescient! [Via Kottke.]

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"Unloveable": Johnny Depp directs a video


A little bit “An Occurence At Owl Creek Bridge”…

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Trailering David Simon's "Treme"

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[PR] Oscar's moving back to February

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Key Dates Announced for 83rd Academy Awards®
Beverly Hills, CA (March 25, 2010) — The 83rd Annual Academy Awards will be presented on Sunday, February 27, 2011, Academy President Tom Sherak announced today. The ceremony will again take place at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live by the ABC Television Network. Key dates currently scheduled are:

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch