Movie City Indie Archive for October, 2009

Yes… feeding squirrel-like kitten with chopsticks

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Good days? Bad days? Good days.



Week later, two million views, still a classic.

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Charles and Ray Eames' Polaroid SX-70 promo film



Technology arrives…

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Out of the box: Richard Kelly's 1996 The Goodbye Place

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VIFF 2009 trailers: Sexuality and Subtitles



Vancouver’s fest trailers are always pretty swell.

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Picturing Chicago International Film Festival 45 award ceremonies

The Chicago International Film Festival’s 45th edition runs through Thursday, but juried awards were handed out Saturday night at the Pump Room of the Ambassador East Hotel. In the International Feature Film Competition, three prizes went to Tina Mabry’s Mississippi Damned, a Gold Hugo for Best Film, a Gold Plaque for Best Supporting Acress to Jossie Harris Thacker and another GP for Mabry’s screenplay. Andrea Arnold’s Fish Tank took a Silver Hugo Special Jury Award for “esthetic boldness” along with a GP for Michael Fassbender for Best Supporting Actor. Vincere took Silver Hugos for Marco Bellocchio as Best Director, Giovanna Mezzogiorno as Best Actress and Filippo Timi for Best Actor, along with a Gold Plaque for Best Cinematography, Daniele Cipri. Hipsters took a Gold Plaque for Best Art Direction. Only a handful of winners were present: the Mississippi Damned crew was happy to be there. New Directors and Short Film nods listed in the festival press release after the jump, along with video (below) of Martin Landau accepting an Achievement Award in the Chicago hotel where North by Northwest was shot. [Ray Pride.]
John Russell Taylor's 39th Chicago International Film Festival


This is critic John Russell Taylor’s 39th consecutive CIFF, he says.


David Robinson

David Robinson served on the documentary jury.

Bruce Webb, director, The Be All And End ALL

Bruce Webb directed competition entry The Be All And End All.

Martin Landau

Martin Landau says the film industry has changed in 50 years.

Bisset signs

A scrum of autograph hunters outside the hotel sought a signature from jury president Jacqueline Bissett.


Remarks

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An hour of Hitchcock on the "Tomorrow" show



The wavy rainbows when the VHS recorder was restarted after commercial are a nice throwback as well. The other embeds are below on a single page. Via @Ebertchicago. And here’s sixteen or so hours for your iPod: the complete recordings of the Hitchcock-Truffaut interviews.

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Für Falcon: A fictional, non-hoax balloon ride gone wrong



Roger Michel’s beautifully edited opening scene of Enduring Love, dubbed in German, but it still looks swell.

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Trailering Edge of Darkness

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Oscar's got 65 foreign-language contenders

Sez the Academy:
Albania, “Alive!,” Artan Minarolli, director;
Argentina, “El Secreto de Sus Ojos,” Juan Jose Campanella, director;
Armenia, “Autumn of the Magician,” Rouben Kevorkov and Vaheh Kevorkov, directors;
Australia, “Samson & Delilah,” Warwick Thornton, director;
Austria, “For a Moment Freedom,” Arash T. Riahi, director;
Bangladesh, “Beyond the Circle,” Golam Rabbany Biplob, director;
Belgium, “The Misfortunates,” Felix van Groeningen, director;
Bolivia, “Zona Sur,” Juan Carlos Valdivia, director;
Bosnia and Herzegovina, “Nightguards,” Namik Kabil, director;
Brazil, “Time of Fear,” Sergio Rezende, director;
Bulgaria, “The World Is Big and Salvation Lurks around the Corner,” Stephan Komandarev, director;
oscahs2010.jpgCanada, “I Killed My Mother,” Xavier Dolan, director;
Chile, “Dawson, Isla 10,” Miguel Littin, director;
China, “Forever Enthralled,” Chen Kaige, director;
Colombia, “The Wind Journeys,” Ciro Guerra, director;
Croatia, “Donkey,” Antonio Nuic, director;
Cuba, “Fallen Gods,” Ernesto Daranas, director;
Czech Republic, “Protektor,” Marek Najbrt, director;
Denmark, “Terribly Happy,” Henrik Ruben Genz, director;

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#chaosreigns: IFC embraces viral goofing for Antichrist

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IFC’s circulating the link to Peter Debruge’s The Satanic Mr. Fox mashup: a warning that there’s footage from the thus-far most notorious scene from Antichrist. (But not involving human mutilation.) Here’s the YouTube link.

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John Woo at U.S. premiere of Red Cliff at Chicago International Film Festival

John Woo
John Woo screened


Woo was late to a pre-premiere reception; journalists traded Hong Kong gangster film scenarios for the director’s non-appearance.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé