Movie City Indie Archive for June, 2009

You want to travel blind: portraits

Kitano considers
Azita
Ondaatje before reading
An exhibition of portraits of film figures and friends is running in Chicago through July 26 at the Rainbo Club. The address, more information and other pictures are here. [Takeshi Kitano; Azita Youssefi; Michael Ondaatje]

Riot police turn and run from BBC Persia

hurrah_they_yelled.jpgLink here.












Animation: She Farted and Created the World by Scott Coello

Under fire [violence]

Truth in advertising?

lepetderniereamarienbad.jpgA campaign for the DVD of Paul Blart, Mall Cop was replaced on The Awl by one for Last Year At Marienbad, but part of the earlier ad remains… Or is this a new Criterion we’re seeing here?

Jerzy Skolimowski on his missing years as a director

skolimowski_the_judgement_full.JPGIn Vertigo, John Riley talks to about the 17 years between features. “Even during that long break, I looked at film projects, but either I was too lazy or just resting or I was focusing on becoming a serious painter. The process of painting feeds my needs now. You concentrate on doing something exactly as you want. With film-making there are always compromises, you can’t do exactly as you would wish, you’re not even trying to do that. But Four Nights With Anna is as close as I’ve ever got to making exactly the film I wanted—maybe not 100% but the high 90s. It was a small budget but I insisted on doing things exactly as I wanted. Filmmaking is really hard work, physically hard work, so I can’t say I enjoy it, but to create art one has to suffer! But, to my surprise, I feel ready to make another film: I have a great subject, I can see how to do it; I’m working on a script and have about half the money for my next project. So the prospects are good!” [A good career overview.][Art.]

Mad Max in Esfehan, Iran



Leather-jacketed riot cops on motor scooters chased by protesting citizens… the end of the shot is like the end shots of Wenders’ State of Things and Jarmusch’s Limits of Control. [Via Andrew Sullivan.]

But, of course, it’s not fiction:


[Via Laura Secor in the New Yorker.]

Tetro, brought to you by…

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This has to be the most honest film ad in ages… What brought you Tetro? What paid for Coppola’s latest opus? Safeway, aisle 3. Synergy, theater 4. The citation of the theater at the bottom of the ad is also neatly reminiscent of the 1970s full-page ads for Cinema 1 or Cinema 2 or the Beekman premiering Nashville or The Conversation. [From Friday, June 12’s New York Times.]

Excellent Response



From a project by MJ Buffett.

Deadline by Bang-yao Liu



The pressures of deadlines reflected in stop-motion animation of Post-It notes. A student project from the Savannah College of Art and Design.

Circles, squares, dollars, cents

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[PR] Anvil, stars of Anvil! The Story Of Anvil opening for AC/DC at Giants Stadium

anvil460.jpg


[Photo by Brent J. Craig.]
HARD ROCK LEGENDS AC/DC TAP CANADIAN METAL BAND ANVIL OF THE CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED FILM “ANVIL! THE STORY OF ANVIL” AS OPENERS FOR JULY 28 SHOW AT GILLETTE STADIUM AND JULY 31 SHOW AT GIANTS STADIUM
New York, NY (June 8, 2009) – Based on the overwhelming response to and incredible buzz created by the critically acclaimed documentary “Anvil! The Story of Anvil,” the band has been chosen to fill the spot as opening act for rock legends AC/DC at their Gillette Stadium show on July 28th and their Giants Stadium show on July 31st. Anvil band members, Steve “Lips” Kudlow and Robb Reiner will see their dreams come true as they are set to open for one of the greatest hard rock bands in the world, AC/DC, for the two biggest shows on their Black Ice World Tour. This opportunity marks a stellar comeback for the 30 year-old band that continues to reach new heights with the success and continued expansion of their documentary and recent features in Newsweek and Rolling Stone.
“Anvil! The Story of Anvil” is the directorial debut of screenwriter Sacha Gervasi (“The Terminal”) and was produced by Rebecca Yeldham (“The Kite Runner” and “The Motorcycle Diaries”). The film follows Steve “Lips” Kudlow and Robb Reiner and their band, Anvil, which released one of the heaviest albums in metal history, 1982’s Metal on Metal. The album influenced an entire musical generation of rock bands, including Metallica, Slayer, and Anthrax, who all went on to sell millions of records. Anvil, on the other hand, took a different path—straight to obscurity. The film is both entertaining and touching as it follows their last-ditch quest for the fame and fortune that has been so elusive to them. “Anvil! The Story of Anvil” is a timeless tale of survival and the unadulterated passion it takes to follow your dream, year after year.

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David Fincher directs iPhone spot, "Break In"



Or, download here.

Indie is waking up

Perchance to dreamIvyLeaned

Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda