Movie City Indie

Jackie Kennedy’s White House Tour 53’42”

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“Under The Influence”: Barry Jenkins on Wong Kar-wai

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Scenes From Editor Anne V. Coates’ Governor’s Award

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Scenes From Frederick Wiseman’s Governors’ Award



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Criterion Video-Tributes Raoul Coutard (4’43” vid)

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Media Nonprofits Solicit In Current Moment: IDA, The Baffler

THE INDEPENDENT DOCUMENTARY ASSOCIATION

A Message from the IDA
Documentary storytelling expands our understanding of shared human experience, fostering an informed, compassionate and connected world. That’s the first sentence of our mission statement. It’s what we believe and why we do what we do.
At the moment there is a lot of uncertainty about what this election and incoming administration will mean for many of the values we hold dear and the issues we care most deeply about. But it is absolutely certain that the work of independent documentary makers is more important now than ever. And we know that makes our work supporting this community more important than ever.
The IDA has always highlighted the vital role that documentary artists, activists and journalists play in our democracy. And in the days and years ahead, we promise to support you as you tell important stories that shine a light on dark places, call out injustice and speak truth to power. As an organization, we will work hard to defend your rights and amplify your voices.
As a community, you are resourceful, scrappy, passionate and brave. Keep making movies. Keep making a difference.
We see this new reality we’re facing as an opportunity to redouble our efforts, so we want to hear from you about how we can best support our community. Reach out to us at listen@documentary.org or by responding to this letter.
In partnership,
The IDA

THE BAFFLER

Dear friend,

I’m thirty-four. I voted for the first time in 2000. Now, for the second time in my adult life, we face the prospect of a right-wing idiot in the White House, surrounded by the scum of the earth as his appointees and advisers. And, amazingly, this time around the nation’s future looks even more grim. We hope you’ll agree that the work of The Baffler is going to be crucial in the time ahead.


We have the best analyses of what’s wrong with the American political, media, and business establishment—and we will help figure out the best strategies for fighting a new breed of fascism with American characteristics. Reading The Baffler will be a source of solace, of community in the face of danger, and of constructive suggestions in the face of helplessness.


The Baffler Foundation, our parent organization that exists solely to publish the magazine, relies mostly on donations. As we enter this perilous era, please give now and help us get the intellectual fight back into gear before it’s too late.

Yours,
Noah McCormack
Publisher

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1’41” Of “Twin Peaks” Behind-The-Scenes Chatter

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Barry Jenkins’ “Chlorophyl” (2011) (17’23”)

 

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Pride, Unprejudiced: Hooligan Sparrow, Café Society

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Hooligan Sparrow (POV premiere October 17)

“They can’t stop me, not by arresting me, not by killing me.” Nanfu Wang’s urgent first feature takes on the secretive side of China’s vast, controlling government, with only the recourse of gutsy guerilla filmmaking to capture the journey of activist Ye Haiyan (known as “Hooligan Sparrow”) and a group of activists who travel to Hainan Province in southern China to illegally protest the case of six elementary school girls who were sexually abused by their principal. (Her earlier work focused on sex workers and the attacks on women by authority are at the center here.) Much of the documentary was shot clandestinely with concealed recording devices, then smuggled out of the country. “I never expected to be interrogated by national security agents, and that my family and friends would be harassed and threatened by secret police,” Nanfu Wang has written, “but this is the China I saw.” The shards of surveillance of secret police, of intimidation by plainclothes operatives and the sheer oppressive weight meant to crush resistance are equally horrifying, and captured with kaleidoscopic perseverance. The executive producers are Andy Cohen, who had the same role on 2012’s “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry” and Alison Klayman, director-producer of that pungent documentary. Broadcast debut Monday October 17 on PBS: details.

Café Society (Lionsgate Blu, $40)

Café Society, Woody Allen’s forty-ninth or so feature, completed at the age of eighty, is a light romance, but lit with the most serious of ethereal light by the great Vittorio Storaro (The Conformist, Apocalypse Now), providing Allen with his first shot-on-digital picture. Whether in overcast New York City or honeyed L.A., Café Society is Allen’s best-looking movie since the heyday of his seminal collaborations with Gordon Willis. It’s the 1930s and lightly sketched Bronx boy Bobby Dorfman (Jesse Eisenberg) escapes his family for Hollywood, and turns from naïf to macher in the reflected light of the even more lightly sketched secretary Vonnie (Kristen Stewart). Steve Carell (taking over for another, older actor who couldn’t stand the heavy lifting of largely sitting in chairs and in barrooms) does clean work as Phil, the quietly rat-a-tat agent who brings the pair together (and pulls them apart). The jokes are familiar, beginning with Bobby’s battling family (Jeannie Berlin, Ken Stott) and his cut-to-the-punchline gangster brother (Corey Stoll). Still, the ineffable Berlin is a voice of steady umbrage. And Storaro’s light can do no wrong upon faces, bringing out a piercing pale blue I’ve never seen in Eisenberg’s eyes, and making Stewart both modern and classical, her face radiating different in generous light that ranges from burnished to creamy to dreamy to candlelight to nightclub-bound. One of the many name-dropping lines that pass for dialogue, “What do you think of Joel McCrea?”—is followed by a shot of Eisenberg, practically McCrea in a nimbus of afternoon light.

The design extends in multiple lovely settings to the color experimentation Storaro practices, such as a light swoon of a moment where we first notice a simple, red-detailed dress worn by Stewart, who then walks toward a bar with a red neon “Cocktails” sign, passing beneath a spray of red maple leaves. (This is not to neglect Santo Loquasto’s design genius.) A repetition of gun murders ordered by Bobby’s brothers brings Allen’s direct shooting style close to that of Alan Clarke’s dispassionate “Elephant.” It’s a bracing element amid the agreeable japery and pleasantly familiar goings-on. The melodies of the casual storytelling are like a familiar song heard from the street below, or TCM playing in a nearby apartment. “Dare I kiss you?” “How dare you not?” (Stewart sounds the second line to perfection.) Allen’s largely superfluous voiceover sounds as if he’s sight-reading unfamiliar and unpleasant text, his belabored delivery also capturing the clack of teeth and the sigh of difficult breath. (If only Todd Solondz had narrated, even if his is a Jersey accent.) With Blake Lively as the translucent slip of a blonde who cannot supplant the memory of Vonnie despite bearing the same name; Parker Posey, Corey Stoll, Paul Schneider.

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Congratulations, Bob Dylan, With Nod To “Former Rolling Stones Bassist Bill Wyman”

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“Mr. Dylan’s work remains utterly lacking in conventionality, moral sleight of hand, pop pabulum or sops to his audience,” Bill Wyman, a journalist, wrote in a 2013 Op-Ed essay in The New York Times arguing for Mr. Dylan to get the award. “His lyricism is exquisite; his concerns and subjects are demonstrably timeless; and few poets of any era have seen their work bear more influence.”

“Journalist Bill Wyman has been Bill Wyman since his birth on Jan. 11, 1961. Musician Bill Wyman became Bill Wyman two years later. Before that, he was William George Perks.” But his assumed name lives on in the heart of Brooklyn Vegan!

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Teasing Oliver Assayas’ PERSONAL SHOPPER (1’20”)

Opens March 20 from IFC.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

Kyle Buchanan: I think the deal with a lot of white, male critics is there’s a very empirical way that they write that they write their movie reviews that always puzzled me. Movies are such subjective things. Back in the day, I used to be the film critic for The Advocate, and it was really striking to me when I would go into screening rooms and I was by far the youngest. They were filled with old white men. And when you watch a film like Black Snake Moan, that’s playing with a whole lot of gender and race issues, I was like, Are like 70-year-old white men like really the sole voices that I want to hear on this movie? It just didn’t feel right.

Jen Yamato I’ve been very pleasantly surprised to see the receptions Moonlight has gotten. But one of the films that I was disappointed to see not get more traction was American Honey. I distinctly remember sitting in a screening room full of mostly older white guys and thinking during the film, How are any of them going to relate to this movie?

~ Taking On The “Old White Guys”

“I was frustrated, a bit angry even. There should be no need for winning in the arts. Awards condition people into thinking that art is a competition, that good cinema is prize-winning … that a filmmaker must win an award or two to be considered finance-worthy. It enables the slow death of many and lack of support for most. My films do not ask to be liked. In fact, my films actively seek to be disliked. It seems that I have failed at this goal. What does it mean to be political in the time of Trump… in the country of Duterte? I dedicate the film to all the outsiders of the world: kids, midgets, freaks, paralytics, prostitutes, scoundrels. These are my people. I make outsider films that talk about the pain and joy of not belonging, of always being on the outside peering in.”
~ Prolific Philippines Filmmaker Khavn de la Cruz On Getting A Prize From Geneva Int’l Film Fest