The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies

Movie City Indie

Mike Leigh In The Criterion DVD Cupboard (7’24″)

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Trailer Noah Baumbach’s WHEN WE’RE YOUNG (2’33″)

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Clipping Egoyan’s THE CAPTIVE (1’51″)

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Dr. Uwe Boll Goes-a-Crowdfunding

RAMPAGE 2

From: uwe boll
Subject: Re: Uwe Boll starts INDIEGOGO campaign for RAMPAGE 3 ….. 
Date: November 25, 2014 at 1:23:01 PM PST

Behind this campaign!

Hello, my name is Uwe Boll and I directed , wrote and produced over 30 movies with stars like Ben Kingsley, Jason Statham, Ray Liotta and Ron Perlman.

The RAMPAGE series is really close to my heart. RAMPAGE 1 and 2  together with my movies DARFUR, AUSCHWITZ, ASSAULT ON WALLSTREET, STOIC and POSTAL are the most important movies of my career.  RAMPAGE nails the cynical world we are living in and now I need your help to finance RAMPAGE 3. Although Rampage 2 has been a huge success it did not make enough to get the financing of RAMPAGE 3.

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Steve James on LIFE ITSELF at DOC NYC (12’43″)

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“It’s not groovy to be insane”: A UK Glimpse Of INHERENT VICE (0’37″)

From Paul Thomas Anderson’s Al Rose Productions YouTube channel.

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“The Seamless Look of BIRDMAN” 3’43″

Fascinating, even if the narrator calls it “totally unique.”

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Building a 70mm print of INTERSTELLAR (1’05″ timelapse)

At The Bullock Texas State History Museum. “Chief IMAX Projectionist David Ripper assembled 49 reels of film measuring over 10 miles and weighing nearly 600 pounds. Watch this video to see a 6 hour process condensed to just over one minute.”

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A Compendium Of Conversations With Laura Poitras And Edward Snowden About CITIZENFOUR

Edward Snowden introduces CITIZENFOUR at Leipzig Doc.

Laura Poitras: “I began documenting something in an observational way and then got pulled into the history that I was documenting. That certainly happened when I was put on a watch list by the U.S. government and began to be detained at borders. But it wasn’t just because I was put on a watch list that I was interested in surveillance. Over the course of my films, I’ve shifted from thinking that the pendulum swung in one direction after 9/11 and would swing back, to being less naive about the choices that were made. Surveillance is one of the ways the national-security state expanded after 9/11. I always thought that, after doing the Guantanamo film, I wanted to do something to bring the story home, and surveillance is set in the U.S. But it seemed like a tough theme to approach in a documentary because it’s hidden.” Conor Friedersdorf talks to Laura Poitras

Read the full article »

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Laura Poitras’ Post-CITIZENFOUR Columbia, MO Q&A (32’19″)

Does this matter? This matters.

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Movie City Indie

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Yes, good movies sprout up, inevitably, in the cracks and seams between the tectonic plates on which all of these franchises stay balanced, and we are reassured of their hardiness. But we don’t see what we don’t see; we don’t see the effort, or the cost of the effort, or the movies of which we’re deprived because of the cost of the effort. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice may have come from a studio, but it still required a substantial chunk of outside financing, and at $35 million, it’s not even that expensive. No studio could find the $8.5 million it cost Dan Gilroy to make Nightcrawler. Birdman cost a mere $18 million and still had to scrape that together at the last minute. Imagine American movie culture for the last few years without Her or Foxcatcher or American Hustle or The Master or Zero Dark Thirty and it suddenly looks markedly more frail—and those movies exist only because of the fairy godmothership of independent producer Megan Ellison. The grace of billionaires is not a great business model on which to hang the hopes of an art form.”
~ Mark Harris On The State Of The Movies

How do you make a Top Ten list? For tax and organizational purposes, I keep a log of every movie I see (Title, year, director, exhibition format, and location the film was viewed in). Anything with an asterisk to the left of its title means it’s a 2014 release (or something I saw at a festival which is somehow in play for the year). If there’s a performance, or sequence, or line of dialogue, even, that strikes me in a certain way, I’ll make a note of it. So when year end consideration time (that is, the month and change out of the year where I feel valued) rolls around, it’s a little easier to go through and pull some contenders for categories. For 2014, I’m voting in three polls: Indiewire, SEFCA (my critics’ guild), and the Muriels. Since Indiewire was first, it required the most consternation. There were lots of films that I simply never had a chance to see, so I just went with my gut. SEFCA requires a lot of hemming and hawing and trying to be strategic, even though there’s none of the in-person skullduggery that I hear of from folk whose critics’ guild is all in the same city. The Muriels is the most fun to contribute to because it’s after the meat market phase of awards season. Also, because it’s at the beginning of next year, I’ll generally have been able to see everything I wanted to by then. I love making hierarchical lists, partially because they are so subjective and mercurial. Every critical proclamation is based on who you are at that moment and what experiences you’ve had up until that point. So they change, and that’s okay. It’s all a weird game of timing and emotional waveforms, and I’m sure a scientist could do an in-depth dissection of the process that leads to the discovery of shocking trends in collective evaluation. But I love the year end awards crush, because I feel somewhat respected and because I have a wild-and-wooly work schedule that has me bouncing around the city to screenings, or power viewing the screeners I get sent.
Jason Shawhan of Nashville Scene Answers CriticWire