Movie City Indie

2017 FYC (For Your Consideration) Screenplays Now Up To 36 Titles

PDF downloads, for the duration of the 2017 awards season. (Make a note in comments if a link doesn’t load.)

Battle of the Sexes, written by Simon Beaufoy

Beauty and the Beast, screenplay by Stephen Chbosky and Evan Spiliotopoulos; based on 1991 animated film written by Linda Woolvert

The Beguiled, Written by Sofia Coppola, based on the novel by Thomas Cullinan

The Big Sick, Written by Kumail Nanjiani & Emily V. Gordon [secondary link]

Brad’s Status, Written by Mike White

Breathe, Written by William Nicholson

Brigsby Bear, Story by Kyle Mooney; Screenplay by Kevin Costello & Kyle Mooney

Coco, Original Story By Lee Unkrich, Jason Katz, Matthew Aldrich, Adrian Molina; Screenplay By Adrian Molina and Matthew Aldrich

Darkest Hour, Written By Anthony McCarten

The Disaster Artist, Written by Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber; Based on the book by Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell

Downsizing, Written by Alexander Payne & Jim Taylor

A Fantastic Woman,  Screenplay by Sebastián Lelio, Gonzalo Maza

First They Killed My Father, Screenplay by Loung Ung & Angelina Jolie; Based on the Book “First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers” by Loung Ung

The Florida Project, Written by Sean Baker & Chris Bergoch

Get Out, by Jordan Peele

Guardians of the Galaxy V. 2. Written by James Gunn

Happy End, Written By Michael Haneke

I, Tonya, Written by Steven Rogers

Lady Bird, Written by Greta Gerwig

Last Flag Flying, by Richard Linklater & Darryl Ponicsan

Logan, Story by James Mangold. Screenplay by Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green

The Lost City of Z, Screenplay by James Gray; Based on the Book by David Grann

Loveless, By Oleg Negin, Andrey Zvyagintsev

The Man Who Invented Christmas, Screenplay by Susan Coyne; Based on the Book by Les Standiford

Mark Felt, Written by Peter Landesman

Maudie, Written by Sherrie White

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected), Written by Noah Baumbach

mother!, Written by Darren Aronofsky

Mudbound, Screenplay by Virgil Williams and Dee Rees; Based on the Novel by Hillary Jordan

Norman, By Joseph Cedar

Novitiate, By Maggie Betts

Okja, Written by Bong Joon Ho and Jon Ronson

The Shape of Water, Written by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Written by Martin McDonagh

Thor: Ragnarok, Written by Eric Pearson and Craig Kyle & Christopher L. Yost

Victoria & Abdul, By Lee Hall

War For The Planet of the Apes, Written by Mark Bomback & Matt Reeves; Based on Characters Created by Rick Jaffa & Amanda Silver

Wonderstruck, Written by Brian Selznick

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James Gunn And James Mangold On Politics At The End Of 2017

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Craft Summit 2017: The Art of Editing with Walter Murch (58 min)

19 For Your Consideration Screenplays Await

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PDF downloads, for at least the duration of the 2017 awards season.

Battle of the Sexes, written by Simon Beaufoy

Beauty and the Beast, screenplay by Stephen Chbosky and Evan Spiliotopoulos; based on 1991 animated film written by Linda Woolvert

The Beguiled, Written by Sofia Coppola, based on the novel by Thomas Cullinan

The Big Sick, Written by Kumail Nanjiani & Emily V. Gordon

Brad’s Status, Written by Mike White

Breathe, Written by William Nicholson

First They Killed My Father, Screenplay by Loung Ung & Angelina Jolie; Based on the Book “First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers” by Loung Ung

Guardians of the Galaxy V. 2. Written by James Gunn.

I, Tonya, Written by Steven Rogers

Last Flag Flying, by Richard Linklater & Darryl Ponicsan

Logan, Story by James Mangold. Screenplay by Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green

The Lost City of Z, Screenplay by James Gray; Based on the Book by David Grann

The Man Who Invented Christmas, Screenplay by Susan Coyne; Based on the Book by Les Standiford

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected), Written by Noah Baumbach

mother!, Written by Darren Aronofsky

Mudbound, Screenplay by Virgil Williams and Dee Rees; Based on the Novel by Hillary Jordan

Okja, Written by Bong Joon Ho and Jon Ronson

The Shape of Water, Written by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor [withdrawn]

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Written by Martin McDonagh

Wonderstruck, Written by Brian Selznick

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Six Minutes With The Safdies In The Criterion Closet

The Key West Hemingway Cats Are Safe (With 66-Second Doc On 12-Toed Cats)


12 Toes from Ray Pride on Vimeo.

Trailering Ai Weiwei’s “Human Flow”

PTA’s “Right Now” Video For Haim (4’31”)

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Jonathan Demme in the Modern World: On MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE (2004)

Unlike his actors, Demme saw John Frankenheimer’s film on its first release. “I saw the original when I was a teenager,” he tells me. “I was an avid moviegoer, I saw everything,” he says, hardly taking a breath.

DEMME: Everything, everything. I was really hooked on movies at a very young age. The Manchurian Candidate, along with Seven Days in May, Fail-Safe and Dr. Strangelove [were] this quartet of anarchistic black-and-white American movies, each of which did things that you just didn’t do in American movies, especially in the realm of irreverence toward politics and government institutions and the Army. I was what, 16, it was shocking, it was thrilling and interestingly, it predated my exposure to the French New Wave, so in away, this was the American, a certain kind of new wave in American movies. So Manchurian Candidate was a trailblazer, it was a shocker, it was a great picture and it altered the way I thought about movies! [Demme caps the rush of words with a pleased whooshing sound.]

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Trailering Sofia Coppola’s THE BEGUILED (2’22”)

Movie City Indie

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What do you make of the criticism directed at the film that the biopic genre or format is intrinsically bourgeois? That’s the most crazy criticism. That’s an excuse for not engaging with the content of the movie. Film critics sometimes, you know, can be very lazy.

Come on, formal criticism is valuable too. But I’m amazed when this is the thing they put in front of the discourse. My situation is that I’m dealing with a highly explosive subject, a taboo subject that nobody wants to deal with.

Karl Marx? Yes, this is the first film ever in the Western world about Marx. And I managed to make an almost mainstream film out of it. You want me at the same time to play the artist and do a risky film about the way my camera moves and the way I edit? No, it’s complicated enough! The artistic challenge — and it took me ten years with Pascal to write this story — was the writing. That was the most difficult part. We were making a film about the evolution of an idea, which is impossible. To be able to have political discourse in a scene, and you can follow it, and it’s not simplified, and it’s historically true. This is the accomplishment. So when someone criticizes the formal aspects without seeing that first, for me, it’s laziness or ignorance. There’s an incapacity to deal with what’s on the table. I make political films about today, I’m not making a biopic to make a biopic. I don’t believe in being an artist just to be an artist. And by the way, this film cost $9 million. I dare anyone in the United States to make this film for $9 million.
Raoul Peck on The Young Karl Marx

“The Motion Picture Academy, at considerable expense and with great efficiency, runs all the nominated pictures at its own theater, showing each picture twice, once in the afternoon, once in the evening. A nominated picture is one in connection with which any kind of work is nominated for an award, not necessarily acting, directing, or writing; it may be a purely technical matter such as set-dressing or sound work. This running of pictures has the object of permitting the voters to look at films which they may happen to have missed or to have partly forgotten. It is an attempt to make them realize that pictures released early in the year, and since overlaid with several thicknesses of battered celluloid, are still in the running and that consideration of only those released a short time before the end of the year is not quite just.

“The effort is largely a waste. The people with votes don’t go to these showings. They send their relatives, friends, or servants. They have had enough of looking at pictures, and the voices of destiny are by no means inaudible in the Hollywood air. They have a brassy tone, but they are more than distinct.”All this is good democracy of a sort. We elect Congressmen and Presidents in much the same way, so why not actors, cameramen, writers, and all rest of the people who have to do with the making of pictures? If we permit noise, ballyhoo, and theater to influence us in the selection of the people who are to run the country, why should we object to the same methods in the selection of meritorious achievements in the film business? If we can huckster a President into the White House, why cannot we huckster the agonized Miss Joan Crawford or the hard and beautiful Miss Olivia de Havilland into possession of one of those golden statuettes which express the motion picture industry’s frantic desire to kiss itself on the back of its neck? The only answer I can think of is that the motion picture is an art. I say this with a very small voice. It is an inconsiderable statement and has a hard time not sounding a little ludicrous. Nevertheless it is a fact, not in the least diminished by the further facts that its ethos is so far pretty low and that its techniques are dominated by some pretty awful people.

“If you think most motion pictures are bad, which they are (including the foreign), find out from some initiate how they are made, and you will be astonished that any of them could be good. Making a fine motion picture is like painting “The Laughing Cavalier” in Macy’s basement, with a floorwalker to mix your colors for you. Of course most motion pictures are bad. Why wouldn’t they be?”
~ Raymond Chandler, “Oscar Night In Hollywood,” 1948