Interviews

A Conversation with Tamara Drewe Director Stephen Frears

Interview by Andrea Gronvall – We shot it late in the year–in September, not in mid-summer. By September the sun was starting to get low in the sky, so that’s when it looks especially beautiful. And this [the story] had to cover all of the seasons, so you wanted a time of the year that gave you the most possibilities.

Read the full article » 2 Comments »

Digital Nation: Down Terrace

One of the knocks against portrayals of organized crime in American movies and television is that they tend to make criminality look like a reasonable career choice, until the bullets and subpoenas start flying, anyway. The same applies for the use of drugs, alcohol, tobacco and firearms. It’s fun until it isn’t. There’s nothing even…

Read the full article » No Comments »

Digital Nation: Barry Munday

As red herrings go, it’s tough to beat castration. The title character of Chris D’Arienzo’s truly offbeat comedy, Barry Munday, undergoes just such an operation. It’s required after the father of a promiscuous teenager slams a trumpet into crotch of the two-bit, happy-hour lothario in a movie theater. Poor Barry didn’t even have time to…

Read the full article » 2 Comments »

Catfish directors Henry Joost & Ariel Schulman, star Nev Schulman

DP/30 – The dynamic trio of filmmaker/subjects from the Sundance sensation Catfish talk with David Poland about how and why they made the film.

Read the full article » 1 Comment »

Interview: The Savory Sound of Fatih Akin’s Soul Kitchen

Music is both architecture and pulse in Fatih Akin’s tasty, generous farcical food-com, “Soul Kitchen.” Music’s there from the start of writing the script, he tells me, as well as confessing a nasty addiction to something called “vinyl.”

Read the full article » 2 Comments »

Bright Star, director Jane Campion, actor Ben Whishaw (TIFF ’09)

The complete version of this interview got lost in the shuffle. Apologies. Never too late, I guess.

Read the full article » 7 Comments »

The Gronvall Files:Going the Distance from Fact to Fiction with Director Nanette Burstein

Change is good, although it’s not always easy to reinvent oneself. But New York filmmaker Nanette Burstein, a Best Documentary Feature Oscar nominee for On the Ropes (which she co-directed with Brett Morgen), doesn’t miss a step in her transition from nonfiction film to narrative features.

Read the full article » No Comments »

The Gronvall Files, An Interview with Lisa Cholodenko, Director of The Kids Are All Right

Family Matters : An Interview with Lisa Cholodenko, Director of The Kids Are All Right We may only be halfway through the year, but one thing you can bet on: come the end of December, Lisa Cholodenko’s The Kids Are All Right will score among many 2010 Top Ten lists. The director made a huge…

Read the full article » 1 Comment »

Mark Hopkins Director of Living in Emergency

In this podcast, Noah interviews Mark Hopkins, director of the documentary Living in Emergency: Stories of Doctors without Borders. They talk about real-life heroes, The Hurt Locker, Apocalypse Now, and the shocking reality of many non-Westerners’ lives. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Mark Hopkins

Read the full article » No Comments »

Interview with Juan Jose Campanella: The Eyes Have It

This year’s Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film went to an Argentine romantic crime thriller that few people beyond Academy voters and film festival goers were lucky enough to have seen: The Secret in Their Eyes (El Secreto de sus ojos), directed by Juan Jose Campanella, a filmmaker who calls both New York and Argentina home….

Read the full article »

James Gray Director of Two Lovers

Noah has a far-ranging conversation with Two Lovers director James Gray about Francis Ford Coppola, Italian neo-realism vs French New Wave, The 400 Blows, and his potential next film: The Lost City of Z starring Brad Pitt. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with James Gray

Read the full article » No Comments »

Scott Z. Burns Screenwriter of The Informant

In this podcast, Noah talks to Scott Z. Burns, the screenwriter of The Informant! about working with Sodebergh and Damon, unreliable narrators, and Dog Day Afternoon. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Scott Z. Burns

Read the full article » No Comments »

Lukas Moodysson Director of Mammoth

This week Noah talks to one of his favorite filmmakers, Lukas Moodysson, about his new film Mammoth, working with Gael Garcia Bernal and Michelle Williams, globalization, and Margot at the Wedding. Listent to Noah Forest Podcast with Lukas Moodysson

Read the full article » No Comments »

Michael Sucsy Director of Grey Gardens

This week Noah talks with Grey Gardens director Michael Sucsy about the Maysles Brothers original film, how silly it is to doubt Drew Barrymore and his next project, The Goree Girls. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Michael Sucsy

Read the full article » No Comments »

John Malkovich Star of Disgrace

This week Noah chats with the legendary John Malkovich about his new film Disgrace, working with the Coen Brothers and his affection for Napoleon Dynamite. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with John Malkovich

Read the full article » No Comments »

Judi Krant Director of Made in China

This week Noah talks with Judi Krant, director of the film Made in China which won the Grand Jury Prize at SXSW. They talk about the difficulty of shooting in Shanghai, the relationship between art and commerce, the greatness of Sidney Lumet and the whimsy of Michel Gondry. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Director…

Read the full article » No Comments »

Elisabeth Shue and Thomas Haden Church

This week Noah talks to Elisabeth Shue and Thomas Haden Church about their new film Don McKay, working together and working apart, the wonder of Meryl Streep and Shue’s great work in Cocktail! Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Elisabeth Shue and Thomas Haden Church

Read the full article » No Comments »

Wiley Wiggins Star of Sorry, Thanks

This week Noah talks to Wiley Wiggins about his new film, Sorry, Thanks, being in the cast of Dazed and Confused, mumblecore films, and great sci-fi films. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Wiley Wiggins

Read the full article » No Comments »

Mark Webber Director of Explicit Ills

This week Noah talks to actor turned writer/director Mark Webber about his new film Explicit Ills, working with Jim Jarmusch and Ethan Hawke, and starring in Nickelodeon’s Snow Day. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Director Mark Webber

Read the full article » No Comments »

Andy Fickman Director of Race to Witch Mountain

This week Noah talks to Race to Witch Mountain director Andy Fickman about action movies, the making of Anaconda and beating up The Rock. Listen to Noah Forrest Podcast with Director Andy Fickman

Read the full article » No Comments »

Interviews

Quote Unquotesee all »

Julian Schnabel: Years ago, I was down there with my cousin’s wife Corky. She was wild — she wore makeup on her legs, and she had a streak in her hair like Yvonne De Carlo in “The Munsters.” She liked to paint. I had overalls on with just a T-shirt and looked like whatever. We were trying to buy a bunch of supplies with my cousin Jesse’s credit card. They looked at the credit card, and then they looked at us and thought maybe we stole the card, so they called Jesse up. He was a doctor who became the head of trauma at St. Vincent’s. They said, “There’s somebody here with this credit card and we want to know if it belongs to you.”

He said, “Well, does the woman have dyed blonde hair and fake eyelashes and look like she stepped out of the backstage of some kind of silent movie, and is she with some guy who has wild hair and is kind of dressed like a bum?”

“Yeah, that’s them.”

“Yeah, that’s my cousin and my wife. It’s okay, they can charge it on my card.”
~ Julian Schnabel Remembers NYC’s Now-Shuttered Pearl Paint

MB Cool. I was really interested in the aerial photography from Enter the Void and how one could understand that conceptually as a POV, while in fact it’s more of an objective view of the city where the story takes place. So it’s an objective and subjective camera at the same time. I know that you’re interested in Kubrick. We’ve talked about that in the past because it’s something that you and I have in common—

GN You’re obsessed with Kubrick, too.

MB Does he still occupy your mind or was he more of an early influence?

GN He was more of an early influence. Kubrick has been my idol my whole life, my own “god.” I was six or seven years old when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, and I never felt such cinematic ecstasy. Maybe that’s what brought me to direct movies, to try to compete with that “wizard of Oz” behind the film. So then, years later, I tried to do something in that direction, like many other directors tried to do their own, you know, homage or remake or parody or whatever of 2001. I don’t know if you ever had that movie in mind for your own projects. But in my case, I don’t think about 2001 anymore now. That film was my first “trip” ever. And then I tried my best to reproduce on screen what some drug trips are like. But it’s very hard. For sure, moving images are a better medium than words, but it’s still very far from the real experience. I read that Kubrick said about Lynch’s Eraserhead, that he wished he had made that movie because it was the film he had seen that came closest to the language of nightmares.

Matthew Barney and Gaspar Noé