SXSW

The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/11/14)

On The Daily Buzz from SXSW (taped earlier in the week); Festival head Janet Pierson, The Heart Machine, Spandau Ballet and Hot Topics.

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The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/9/14)

On today’s The Daily Buzz from SXSW, Ethan Hawke, Rob Thomas, and segments on female directors, documentaries, and genres.

If you’re in Austin, you can catch The Daily Buzz on KOOP 97.1FM at 10pm every night or tape-delayed on KCPW in Salt Lake City later in the week. Otherwise, you can check it out only here at MCN.

Also on MCN: DP/30 with Leigh Janiak, who is featured on today’s Daily Buzz.

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The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/8/14)

Here is the daily podcast from Austin, TX, covering what’s going on in the festival of BBQ, beer, and movies this week. Today’s podcast includes Jason Bateman, whose Bad Words had its US premiere on opening night, as well as filmmakers from Song From The Forest, Wild Canaries, and Big Significant Things. If you’re in Austin, you can hear The Daily Buzz on KOOP at 10pm every night or tape-delayed in Salt Lake City. Otherwise, you can check it out daily, only here at MCN.

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Wilmington on Movies: Labor Day

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Green – SXSW Trailer Premiere

Sophia Takal wrote, directed, and stars in this SXSW Emerging Visions Premiere film. MCN is proud to premiere the film’s trailer.

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SXSW # 2

I wake up – not as early as I had hoped and with not a lot of time to get to my Cherry interviews this morning. So with Farah giving me directions on the phone as I drive, I make my way back to the convention center or as I think of it – home base….

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SXSW 2009 Preview

Next week I’ll be heading to the South by Southwest Film Festival, where I’ll be on the jury for the narrative competition. That task alone is going to keep me hopping, with eight films to view in a few short days, but I’m also planning to hit as many other films as I can during my…

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“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott