SXSW

The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/11/14)

On The Daily Buzz from SXSW (taped earlier in the week); Festival head Janet Pierson, The Heart Machine, Spandau Ballet and Hot Topics.

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The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/9/14)

On today’s The Daily Buzz from SXSW, Ethan Hawke, Rob Thomas, and segments on female directors, documentaries, and genres.

If you’re in Austin, you can catch The Daily Buzz on KOOP 97.1FM at 10pm every night or tape-delayed on KCPW in Salt Lake City later in the week. Otherwise, you can check it out only here at MCN.

Also on MCN: DP/30 with Leigh Janiak, who is featured on today’s Daily Buzz.

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The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/8/14)

Here is the daily podcast from Austin, TX, covering what’s going on in the festival of BBQ, beer, and movies this week. Today’s podcast includes Jason Bateman, whose Bad Words had its US premiere on opening night, as well as filmmakers from Song From The Forest, Wild Canaries, and Big Significant Things. If you’re in Austin, you can hear The Daily Buzz on KOOP at 10pm every night or tape-delayed in Salt Lake City. Otherwise, you can check it out daily, only here at MCN.

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Wilmington on Movies: Labor Day

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Green – SXSW Trailer Premiere

Sophia Takal wrote, directed, and stars in this SXSW Emerging Visions Premiere film. MCN is proud to premiere the film’s trailer.

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SXSW # 2

I wake up – not as early as I had hoped and with not a lot of time to get to my Cherry interviews this morning. So with Farah giving me directions on the phone as I drive, I make my way back to the convention center or as I think of it – home base….

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SXSW 2009 Preview

Next week I’ll be heading to the South by Southwest Film Festival, where I’ll be on the jury for the narrative competition. That task alone is going to keep me hopping, with eight films to view in a few short days, but I’m also planning to hit as many other films as I can during my…

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“You know, I was never a critic. I never considered myself as a film critic. I started doing short films, writing screenplays and then for awhile, for a few years I wrote some film theory, including some film criticism because I had to, but I was never… I never had the desire to be a film critic. I never envisioned myself as a film critic, but I did that at a period of my life when I thought I kind of needed to understand things about cinema, understand things about film theory, understand the world map of cinema, and writing about movies gave me that, and also the opportunity to meet filmmakers I admired.

“To me, it was the best possible film school. The way it changed my perspective I suppose is that I believe in this connection between theory and practice. I think that you also make movies with ideas and you need to have ideas about filmmaking to achieve whatever you’re trying to achieve through your movies, but then I started making features in 1986 — a while ago — and I left all that behind.

“For the last three decades I’ve been making movies, I’ve been living, I’ve been observing the world. You become a different person, so basically my perspective on the world in general is very different and I hope that with every movie I make a step forward. I kind of hope I’m a better person, and hopefully a better filmmaker and hopefully try to… It’s very hard for me to go back to a different time when I would have different values in my relationship to filmmaking. I had a stiffer notion of cinema.”
~ Olivier Assayas

A Spirited Exchange

“In some ways Christopher Nolan has become our Stanley Kubrick,” reads the first sentence of David Bordwell’s latest blog post–none of which I want or intend to read after that desperate opening sentence. If he’d written “my” or “some people’s” instead of “our”, I might have read further. Instead, I can only surmise that in some ways David Bordwell may have become our Lars von Trier.”
~ Jonathan Rosenbaum On Facebook

“Jonathan has written a despicable thing in comparing me to Trump. He’s free to read or not read what I write, and even to judge arguments without reading them. It’s not what you’d expect from a sensible critic, but it’s what Jonathan has chosen to do, for reasons of a private nature he has confided to me in an email What I request from him is an apology for comparing my ideas to Trump’s.”
~ David Bordwell Replies

“Yes, I do apologize, sincerely, for such a ridiculous and quite unwarranted comparison. The private nature of my grievance with David probably fueled my post, but it didn’t dictate it, even though I’m willing to concede that I overreacted. Part of what spurred me to post something in the first place is actually related to a positive development in David’s work–an improvement in his prose style ever since he wrote (and wrote very well) about such elegant prose stylists as James Agee and Manny Farber. But this also brought a journalistic edge to his prose, including a dramatic flair for journalistic ‘hooks’ and attention-grabbers, that is part of what I was responding to. Although I realize now that David justifies his opening sentence with what follows, and far less egregiously than I implied he might have, I was responding to the drum roll of that opening sentence as a provocation, which it certainly was and is.”
~ Jonathan Rosenbaum Replies