SXSW

The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/11/14)

On The Daily Buzz from SXSW (taped earlier in the week); Festival head Janet Pierson, The Heart Machine, Spandau Ballet and Hot Topics.

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The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/9/14)

On today’s The Daily Buzz from SXSW, Ethan Hawke, Rob Thomas, and segments on female directors, documentaries, and genres.

If you’re in Austin, you can catch The Daily Buzz on KOOP 97.1FM at 10pm every night or tape-delayed on KCPW in Salt Lake City later in the week. Otherwise, you can check it out only here at MCN.

Also on MCN: DP/30 with Leigh Janiak, who is featured on today’s Daily Buzz.

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The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/8/14)

Here is the daily podcast from Austin, TX, covering what’s going on in the festival of BBQ, beer, and movies this week. Today’s podcast includes Jason Bateman, whose Bad Words had its US premiere on opening night, as well as filmmakers from Song From The Forest, Wild Canaries, and Big Significant Things. If you’re in Austin, you can hear The Daily Buzz on KOOP at 10pm every night or tape-delayed in Salt Lake City. Otherwise, you can check it out daily, only here at MCN.

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Wilmington on Movies: Labor Day

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Green – SXSW Trailer Premiere

Sophia Takal wrote, directed, and stars in this SXSW Emerging Visions Premiere film. MCN is proud to premiere the film’s trailer.

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SXSW # 2

I wake up – not as early as I had hoped and with not a lot of time to get to my Cherry interviews this morning. So with Farah giving me directions on the phone as I drive, I make my way back to the convention center or as I think of it – home base….

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SXSW 2009 Preview

Next week I’ll be heading to the South by Southwest Film Festival, where I’ll be on the jury for the narrative competition. That task alone is going to keep me hopping, with eight films to view in a few short days, but I’m also planning to hit as many other films as I can during my…

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch