SXSW

The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/11/14)

On The Daily Buzz from SXSW (taped earlier in the week); Festival head Janet Pierson, The Heart Machine, Spandau Ballet and Hot Topics.

Read the full article » No Comments »

The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/9/14)

On today’s The Daily Buzz from SXSW, Ethan Hawke, Rob Thomas, and segments on female directors, documentaries, and genres.

If you’re in Austin, you can catch The Daily Buzz on KOOP 97.1FM at 10pm every night or tape-delayed on KCPW in Salt Lake City later in the week. Otherwise, you can check it out only here at MCN.

Also on MCN: DP/30 with Leigh Janiak, who is featured on today’s Daily Buzz.

Read the full article » No Comments »

The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/8/14)

Here is the daily podcast from Austin, TX, covering what’s going on in the festival of BBQ, beer, and movies this week. Today’s podcast includes Jason Bateman, whose Bad Words had its US premiere on opening night, as well as filmmakers from Song From The Forest, Wild Canaries, and Big Significant Things. If you’re in Austin, you can hear The Daily Buzz on KOOP at 10pm every night or tape-delayed in Salt Lake City. Otherwise, you can check it out daily, only here at MCN.

Read the full article » No Comments »

Wilmington on Movies: Labor Day

.

Read the full article » 1 Comment »

Green – SXSW Trailer Premiere

Sophia Takal wrote, directed, and stars in this SXSW Emerging Visions Premiere film. MCN is proud to premiere the film’s trailer.

Read the full article » No Comments »

SXSW # 2

I wake up – not as early as I had hoped and with not a lot of time to get to my Cherry interviews this morning. So with Farah giving me directions on the phone as I drive, I make my way back to the convention center or as I think of it – home base….

Read the full article »

SXSW 2009 Preview

Next week I’ll be heading to the South by Southwest Film Festival, where I’ll be on the jury for the narrative competition. That task alone is going to keep me hopping, with eight films to view in a few short days, but I’m also planning to hit as many other films as I can during my…

Read the full article »

Quote Unquotesee all »

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray

 

“Hollywood executives can rattle off the rules for getting a movie approved by Chinese censors: no sex (too unseemly); no ghosts (too spiritual). Among 10 prohibited plot elements are “disrupts the social order” and “jeopardizes social morality.” Time travel is frowned upon because of its premise that individuals can change history. U.S. filmmakers sometimes anticipate Chinese censors and alter movies before their release. The Oscar-winning alien-invasion drama “Arrival” was edited to make a Chinese general appear less antagonistic before the film’s debut in China this year. For “Passengers,” the space adventure starring Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, a scene showing Mr. Pratt’s bare backside was removed, and a scene of Mr. Pratt chatting in Mandarin with a robot bartender was added.”
~ “Hollywood’s New Script”