Cannes Originals

Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Festival Runners Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Critics Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Asian Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – IMDb’s Col Needham

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes 67 Wrap-Up

Cannes 67 – c’est fini.
After dozens of screenings, predictions, and an endless series of queue debates, we have a Palme d’Or.

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On Jean-Luc Godard / ADIEU AU LANGAGE / GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE 3D

AH DIEUX // AH GOD(ARD)S

That is a pun

2014

Cannes Film Festival

But

Can film

Can film actually festival?

???

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Cannes Review: Clouds of Sils Maria

I kinda love Clouds of Sils Maria. At its best, it is a female version of My Dinner With Andre. At its weakest, it is still interesting. The premise is pretty basic.

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Cannes Competition Review: Leviathan

There’s never a scene where Kolya doesn’t have a myriad of issues weighing on his mind, and these are visible in Serebryakov’s pained, tired facial expressions and believable portrayal of alcoholism (to be sure, Leviathan is boozier than two or three Hong Sang-soo films combined).

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – Hot Topics

Hot Topics Roundtable at Cannes Film Festival with Eric Kohn, Anne Thompson, Marian Masone, Alison Willmore, and Jordan Hoffman.

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Cannes Topper Gilles Jacob On His Slow Fade

Cannes Topper Gilles Jacob On His Slow Fade

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Cannes Un Certain Regard Review: Lost River

If Lost River is the film Ryan Gosling wanted to debut as his first film—and you only get one first film—then I’ll be the first to admit that I had him pegged (as an artist, anyway) as someone entirely different.

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Cannes Review: The Salvation

Yeah, this film rocks.

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Cannes Competition Review: Maps To The Stars

Because Bruce Wagner’s script calls for actors to do and say depraved things with a straight face, the film couldn’t have been made—in this current form, anyway—without Cronenberg’s history of directing violence and dissecting the psycho-bizarre.

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Cannes Competition Review: Wild Tales

Argentine Szifrón, known for his career in comedy television, aims high with his biggest budget to date: Wild Tales intertwines six separate narratives, and the film is primarily successful in finding humor in its theme of ordinary people pushed to their limit.

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Cannes Competition Review: The Captive

The blurring of truth and fiction is a fairly standard theme throughout the director’s filmography, and much of Egoyan’s career is recalled in The Captive.

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Cannes Review: Mr. Turner

Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner is a movie about an artist who is past his moment of greatest glory. A biopic only in that it rests on a historic figure in art, this is not a film about Turner’s inspiration or his method or his history. It is about the other side of the mountain, the apex of which Turner reached before the first shot of this film.

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Cannes Competition Review: Mr. Turner

Though much of the film is immaculate, the sum total lacks an emotional weight to lift the biography off the canvas.

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Cannes 2014: Grace of Monaco

Olivier Dahan is inarguably a genius. He is also, perhaps less clearly, a madman. I was expecting to offer a quick reaction to Grace of Monaco, but the film defied my urge to a quick, clean reaction. It is glorious, magical, inspired… and missing… something. But I have a powerful urge to revisit it to try to get a better handle on it.

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Cannes 2014: Opening Day

I have long been of the opinion that Cannes is an indulgence to US press. Starting my third year covering the festival, I have to say, nothing’s changed that opinion. But like Telluride, it’s a lovely indulgence. It’s the most civil film festival of the biggies. The schedule is loaded, but manageable. The town is…

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Countdown To Cannes: Mike Leigh

The last in a series of snapshots outlining the nineteen directors in the 67th Palme d’Or Competition.

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas