Cannes Originals

Cannes Review: KILLING OF A SACRED DEER

Humanity is exactly what’s on the chopping block in a Yorgos Lanthimos film.

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Cannes Reviews: REDOUBTABLE, 120 BPM

Beyond outlining just how much of an asshole Hazanavicius’ Godard is—including a stupid running joke that seems to suggest the man derives his snobbish power from his sunglasses, which he repeatedly breaks throughout the film—Redoubtable is little more than a series of regrettable decisions that began the moment Hazanavicius started his adaptation.

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Cannes Review: THE SQUARE

The Square is an equilateral triangle—a film with three sharp, pointed edges and a very long ending that’s too rigid for it to turn a corner and assume its final shape. But as the follow-up to a film about the social contract, as well and the bystander effect, Östlund has made something hilarious, frustrating and very clever.

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Cannes Reviews: Okja, Jupiter’s Moon

The yelling started as soon as Okja’s Netflix presentation card appeared, muddying the matter more. This attitude fuels the ongoing debate on the Croisette: Can Netflix films win Palmes d’Or? Should they? The argument being Cannes is a festival where cinema is sacred—that films should be seen on big screens, not on small ones

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Festival Runners Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Critics Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Asian Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – IMDb’s Col Needham

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes 67 Wrap-Up

Cannes 67 – c’est fini.
After dozens of screenings, predictions, and an endless series of queue debates, we have a Palme d’Or.

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On Jean-Luc Godard / ADIEU AU LANGAGE / GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE 3D

AH DIEUX // AH GOD(ARD)S

That is a pun

2014

Cannes Film Festival

But

Can film

Can film actually festival?

???

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Cannes Review: Clouds of Sils Maria

I kinda love Clouds of Sils Maria. At its best, it is a female version of My Dinner With Andre. At its weakest, it is still interesting. The premise is pretty basic.

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Cannes Competition Review: Leviathan

There’s never a scene where Kolya doesn’t have a myriad of issues weighing on his mind, and these are visible in Serebryakov’s pained, tired facial expressions and believable portrayal of alcoholism (to be sure, Leviathan is boozier than two or three Hong Sang-soo films combined).

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – Hot Topics

Hot Topics Roundtable at Cannes Film Festival with Eric Kohn, Anne Thompson, Marian Masone, Alison Willmore, and Jordan Hoffman.

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Cannes Topper Gilles Jacob On His Slow Fade

Cannes Topper Gilles Jacob On His Slow Fade

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Cannes Un Certain Regard Review: Lost River

If Lost River is the film Ryan Gosling wanted to debut as his first film—and you only get one first film—then I’ll be the first to admit that I had him pegged (as an artist, anyway) as someone entirely different.

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Cannes Review: The Salvation

Yeah, this film rocks.

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Cannes Competition Review: Maps To The Stars

Because Bruce Wagner’s script calls for actors to do and say depraved things with a straight face, the film couldn’t have been made—in this current form, anyway—without Cronenberg’s history of directing violence and dissecting the psycho-bizarre.

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Cannes Competition Review: Wild Tales

Argentine Szifrón, known for his career in comedy television, aims high with his biggest budget to date: Wild Tales intertwines six separate narratives, and the film is primarily successful in finding humor in its theme of ordinary people pushed to their limit.

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Cannes Competition Review: The Captive

The blurring of truth and fiction is a fairly standard theme throughout the director’s filmography, and much of Egoyan’s career is recalled in The Captive.

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Cannes Review: Mr. Turner

Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner is a movie about an artist who is past his moment of greatest glory. A biopic only in that it rests on a historic figure in art, this is not a film about Turner’s inspiration or his method or his history. It is about the other side of the mountain, the apex of which Turner reached before the first shot of this film.

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“I never accepted the term contrarian. I think that’s offensive, frankly. And my response to that is: if I’m a contrarian, what are other reviewers? What I strive to do is be a good critic, not somebody who simply accepts the product put in front of me. I guess it scares people to think that they don’t have any originality; that they don’t have the capacity to think for themselves.

“There’s a line a lot of reviewers use that I don’t like at all. They say ‘accept the film on its own terms.’ What that really means is, ‘accept the film as it is advertised.’ That’s got nothing to do with criticism. Nothing to do with having a response as a film watcher. A thinking person has to analyze what’s on screen, not simply rubber-stamp it or kowtow to marketing.”m

“To me, everything does have a political component and I think it’s an interesting way to look at art. It’s one way that makes film reviewing, I think, a politically relevant form of journalism. We do live in a political world, and we bring our political sense to the movies with us – unless you’re the kind of person who goes to the movies and shuts off the outside world. I’m not that kind of person.”
~ Armond White to Luke Buckmaster

“One of comedy’s defining pathologies, alongside literal pathologies like narcissism and self-loathing, is its swaggering certainty that it is part of the political vanguard, while upholding one of the most rigidly patriarchal hierarchies of any art form.”
~ Lindy West