Cannes

Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Festival Runners Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Critics Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – The Asian Roundtable

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – IMDb’s Col Needham

The Daily Buzz is presented in Cannes with the support of Sunrider.com.

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“Do I feel bad? Yeah, I do. I wish [Cannes] liked the film better. Am I gonna kill myself? No. That’s one less tuxedo I have to rent. One more red carpet I don’t have to walk down. They got 35 films they like and mine they didn’t. Fine.”

“Do I feel bad? Yeah, I do. I wish [Cannes] liked the film better. Am I gonna kill myself? No. That’s one less tuxedo I have to rent. One more red carpet I don’t have to walk down. They got 35 films they like and mine they didn’t. Fine.”

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Cannes: Palme d’or Goes Ceylan’s Winter Sleep; Acting Nods To Timothy Spall, Julianne Moore; Jury Prized By Oldest And Youngest Directors In Competition, Godard And Dolan

Cannes: Palme d’or Goes Ceylan’s Winter Sleep; Acting Nods To Timothy Spall, Julianne Moore; Jury Prizes Oldest And Youngest Directors In Competition, Godard And Dolan

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Cannes 67 Wrap-Up

Cannes 67 – c’est fini.
After dozens of screenings, predictions, and an endless series of queue debates, we have a Palme d’Or.

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On Jean-Luc Godard / ADIEU AU LANGAGE / GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE 3D

AH DIEUX // AH GOD(ARD)S

That is a pun

2014

Cannes Film Festival

But

Can film

Can film actually festival?

???

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Cannes Review: Clouds of Sils Maria

I kinda love Clouds of Sils Maria. At its best, it is a female version of My Dinner With Andre. At its weakest, it is still interesting. The premise is pretty basic.

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Cannes Competition Review: Leviathan

There’s never a scene where Kolya doesn’t have a myriad of issues weighing on his mind, and these are visible in Serebryakov’s pained, tired facial expressions and believable portrayal of alcoholism (to be sure, Leviathan is boozier than two or three Hong Sang-soo films combined).

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Cannes: The Daily Buzz – Hot Topics

Hot Topics Roundtable at Cannes Film Festival with Eric Kohn, Anne Thompson, Marian Masone, Alison Willmore, and Jordan Hoffman.

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Cannes Topper Gilles Jacob On His Slow Fade

Cannes Topper Gilles Jacob On His Slow Fade

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Nuri Bilge Ceylan On Journalism Vs. Art

Nuri Bilge Ceylan On Journalism Vs. Art

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“Godard’s camera lens seems like the lens of a futuristically powerful telescope. He sees everything from a very great distance and vast detachment, on a planet of his own, and his communications are garbled and frazzled from being transmitted intergalactic distances.”

“Godard’s camera lens seems like the lens of a futuristically powerful telescope. He sees everything from a very great distance and vast detachment, on a planet of his own, and his communications are garbled and frazzled from being transmitted intergalactic distances.” And –  “It was truly moving to experience first-hand the hearty reception afforded “Goodbye to…

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Cannes Un Certain Regard Review: Lost River

If Lost River is the film Ryan Gosling wanted to debut as his first film—and you only get one first film—then I’ll be the first to admit that I had him pegged (as an artist, anyway) as someone entirely different.

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Cannes Review: The Salvation

Yeah, this film rocks.

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Cannes Competition Review: Maps To The Stars

Because Bruce Wagner’s script calls for actors to do and say depraved things with a straight face, the film couldn’t have been made—in this current form, anyway—without Cronenberg’s history of directing violence and dissecting the psycho-bizarre.

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Cannes Competition Review: Wild Tales

Argentine Szifrón, known for his career in comedy television, aims high with his biggest budget to date: Wild Tales intertwines six separate narratives, and the film is primarily successful in finding humor in its theme of ordinary people pushed to their limit.

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Cannes Competition Review: The Captive

The blurring of truth and fiction is a fairly standard theme throughout the director’s filmography, and much of Egoyan’s career is recalled in The Captive.

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Cannes Review: Mr. Turner

Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner is a movie about an artist who is past his moment of greatest glory. A biopic only in that it rests on a historic figure in art, this is not a film about Turner’s inspiration or his method or his history. It is about the other side of the mountain, the apex of which Turner reached before the first shot of this film.

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray

 

“Hollywood executives can rattle off the rules for getting a movie approved by Chinese censors: no sex (too unseemly); no ghosts (too spiritual). Among 10 prohibited plot elements are “disrupts the social order” and “jeopardizes social morality.” Time travel is frowned upon because of its premise that individuals can change history. U.S. filmmakers sometimes anticipate Chinese censors and alter movies before their release. The Oscar-winning alien-invasion drama “Arrival” was edited to make a Chinese general appear less antagonistic before the film’s debut in China this year. For “Passengers,” the space adventure starring Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, a scene showing Mr. Pratt’s bare backside was removed, and a scene of Mr. Pratt chatting in Mandarin with a robot bartender was added.”
~ “Hollywood’s New Script”