DP/30 Archive for October, 2011

DP/30: Anonymous, director Roland Emmerich

You know him as a destroyer of continents, from Independence Day to The Day After Tomorrow to 2012, he’s blown stuff up real good. But in Anonymous, Roland Emmerich takes on a complex drama based on fact and delivers an incredibly entertaining movie that also makes you think real hard. He taped this DP/30 at The Toronto Film Festival.

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DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin

The cast and writer/director of the Sundance sensation, about to arrive via Fox Searchlight.

And here’s the same crew (add Hugh Dancy) at Sundance 10 months ago…

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DP/30: The Ides of March, actor Evan Rachel Wood

Evan Rachel Wood plays the pivotal role in George Clooney’s new film, in which she shares most of her screen time with Ryan Gosling. Is this role a career changer? The now-24-year-old actress thinks so. She explains why and looks back over her long career.

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DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya

Almodóvar’s latest epic of passion and surprise – his kinkiest in years – stars Antonio Banderas in his sixth film with the legendary filmmaker and Elena Anaya in her second, and first lead role. The conversation is filled with insights about working with Pedro… and SPOILERS. And this is a film you don’t want spoiled. So beware of watching too soon.

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DP/30: Tree of Life, Senior Visual Effects Supervisor Dan Glass

In honor of the release of the Blu-ray/DVD of The Tree of Life, here is a new interview about the film.

You can also find TOL interviews with two of the producers and the lovely & talent Jessica Chastain.

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DP/30 @ TIFF 2011: Crazy Horse, documentarian Frederick Wiseman

The legendary documentarian set his sights on an institution of a different color… a lot of color, really… and a lot of skin, Paris’ Crazy Horse, perhaps the longest running nude review in the world. Wiseman turned up for the latest reincarnation. The film is at NY’s Film Forum this week.

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997

“If one could examine his DNA, it would read ACTOR. He embraced every role with fire and fierce dedication. Playing Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood was his loving tribute to all actors and garnered him a well-deserved Academy Award. His work was his joy and his legacy.”
~ Barbara Bain On Martin Landau