DP/30 Archive for October, 2011

DP/30: Anonymous, director Roland Emmerich

You know him as a destroyer of continents, from Independence Day to The Day After Tomorrow to 2012, he’s blown stuff up real good. But in Anonymous, Roland Emmerich takes on a complex drama based on fact and delivers an incredibly entertaining movie that also makes you think real hard. He taped this DP/30 at The Toronto Film Festival.

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DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin

The cast and writer/director of the Sundance sensation, about to arrive via Fox Searchlight.

And here’s the same crew (add Hugh Dancy) at Sundance 10 months ago…

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DP/30: The Ides of March, actor Evan Rachel Wood

Evan Rachel Wood plays the pivotal role in George Clooney’s new film, in which she shares most of her screen time with Ryan Gosling. Is this role a career changer? The now-24-year-old actress thinks so. She explains why and looks back over her long career.

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DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya

Almodóvar’s latest epic of passion and surprise – his kinkiest in years – stars Antonio Banderas in his sixth film with the legendary filmmaker and Elena Anaya in her second, and first lead role. The conversation is filled with insights about working with Pedro… and SPOILERS. And this is a film you don’t want spoiled. So beware of watching too soon.

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DP/30: Tree of Life, Senior Visual Effects Supervisor Dan Glass

In honor of the release of the Blu-ray/DVD of The Tree of Life, here is a new interview about the film.

You can also find TOL interviews with two of the producers and the lovely & talent Jessica Chastain.

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DP/30 @ TIFF 2011: Crazy Horse, documentarian Frederick Wiseman

The legendary documentarian set his sights on an institution of a different color… a lot of color, really… and a lot of skin, Paris’ Crazy Horse, perhaps the longest running nude review in the world. Wiseman turned up for the latest reincarnation. The film is at NY’s Film Forum this week.

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DP/30

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch