DP/30 Archive for October, 2011

DP/30: Anonymous, director Roland Emmerich

You know him as a destroyer of continents, from Independence Day to The Day After Tomorrow to 2012, he’s blown stuff up real good. But in Anonymous, Roland Emmerich takes on a complex drama based on fact and delivers an incredibly entertaining movie that also makes you think real hard. He taped this DP/30 at The Toronto Film Festival.

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DP/30: Martha Marcy May Marlene, actors Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, and writer/director Sean Durkin

The cast and writer/director of the Sundance sensation, about to arrive via Fox Searchlight.

And here’s the same crew (add Hugh Dancy) at Sundance 10 months ago…

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DP/30: The Ides of March, actor Evan Rachel Wood

Evan Rachel Wood plays the pivotal role in George Clooney’s new film, in which she shares most of her screen time with Ryan Gosling. Is this role a career changer? The now-24-year-old actress thinks so. She explains why and looks back over her long career.

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DP/30: The Skin I Live In, actors Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya

Almodóvar’s latest epic of passion and surprise – his kinkiest in years – stars Antonio Banderas in his sixth film with the legendary filmmaker and Elena Anaya in her second, and first lead role. The conversation is filled with insights about working with Pedro… and SPOILERS. And this is a film you don’t want spoiled. So beware of watching too soon.

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DP/30: Tree of Life, Senior Visual Effects Supervisor Dan Glass

In honor of the release of the Blu-ray/DVD of The Tree of Life, here is a new interview about the film.

You can also find TOL interviews with two of the producers and the lovely & talent Jessica Chastain.

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DP/30 @ TIFF 2011: Crazy Horse, documentarian Frederick Wiseman

The legendary documentarian set his sights on an institution of a different color… a lot of color, really… and a lot of skin, Paris’ Crazy Horse, perhaps the longest running nude review in the world. Wiseman turned up for the latest reincarnation. The film is at NY’s Film Forum this week.

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda