DP/30 Archive for July, 2011

DP/30: The Interrupters, director/producer Steve James & producer Alex Kotlowitz

The award-winning director of Hoops Dreams and the author of There Are No Children Here join forces and return to Chicago’s south side to deliver one of the year’s most powerful documentaries. The idea is simple. When trouble is brewing, interrupt the rage until people cool down and hopefully make better choices. But the strength to help others find moderation often requires heroic measures from people who you might not expect it from. The filmmakers offer a look at the process of creating this extraordinary film.

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DP/30: Friends With Benefits, director Will Gluck

Will Gluck is the latest hot comedy director in town with Easy A breaking out last summer, Friends With Benefits this year, and a wide array of projects in development at Sony (including a remake of About Last Night). He talks about his latest film, his working process with his stars, the projects to come, and a certain Captain in this DP/30, shot on the day of the FWB opening.

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DP/30: TABLOID, director Errol Morris

The legendary documentarian takes on the tabloid tale of Joyce McKinney & The Manacled Mormon… just in time for News Of The World to remind us how tabloid a tabloid can be.

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DP/30: Another Earth, director/co-writer Mike Cahill, actor/co-writer Brit Marling

Sundance’s “It Girl” of 2011, Brit Marling, has seen both of her profoundly indie films picked up by Fox Searchlight. The first, a collaboration with Mike Cahill, is coming to theaters later this month. Meet the duo and hear about their unique working relationship.

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997

“If one could examine his DNA, it would read ACTOR. He embraced every role with fire and fierce dedication. Playing Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood was his loving tribute to all actors and garnered him a well-deserved Academy Award. His work was his joy and his legacy.”
~ Barbara Bain On Martin Landau