DP/30 Archive for November, 2010

Love & Other Drugs, dir/co-wr Ed Zwick, co-wr/prod Marshall Herskovitz

DP/30 – They have been making TV and movies together for decades. This week, they have Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal in the Oscar-buzzed Love & Other Drugs. They took some time to talk about the film, their work together, and the future of the industry.

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Black Swan, actor Natalie Portman

SPOILER WARNING: We discuss the ultimate scenes in the film in this conversation.

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Biutiful, director Alejandro González Iñárritu, cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, editor Stephen Mirrione, composer Gustavo Santaolalla, executive producer Guillermo del Toro

DP/30 – Five of the people who made Biutiful come to life, led by the writer/director, sit for a long chat about the film, the process, and the future of cinema for adults.

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The Social Network, actors Jesse Eisenberg & Andrew Garfield

DP/30 – The yin and the yang of The Social Network, two young actors, Jesse Eisenberg and Andrew Garfield talk about the film, their careers, and a life in show business as they sat for a chat at the Pacific Design Center.

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Budrus, director Julia Bacha

DP/30 – The Palestinian/Israeli conflict is one of the most divisive, intense political debates in the world. Budrus brings it down to the personal.

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DP/30: Winter’s Bone, actor Jennifer Lawrence

DP/30 – Jennifer Lawrence has become about as hot a commodity as a young actress can, based primarily on her powerful performance in Debra Granik’s Winter’s Bone. The young actress spend 30 minutes chatting with David Poland and she may not be what you would expect.

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997

“If one could examine his DNA, it would read ACTOR. He embraced every role with fire and fierce dedication. Playing Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s Ed Wood was his loving tribute to all actors and garnered him a well-deserved Academy Award. His work was his joy and his legacy.”
~ Barbara Bain On Martin Landau