DP/30 Archive for October, 2010

Unstoppable, director Tony Scott

DP/30 – At 66, Tony Scott is still one of the industry’s envelope-pushing visual stylists. But as you will hear in this conversation, his priorities start with story. We talk about his new film, Unstoppable, and many others from his career, including his first, The Hunger, and his fear of Deneuve & Bowie.

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DP/30: Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, actor Noomi Rapace

DP/30 – She’s one of the current IT Girls of Hollywood, scoring a supporting role in the next Sherlock Holmes film, as well as being seriously considered for the role of Ripley in the Alien prequel. How did this actress get from Stockholm to The Movie City? Spend 30 minutes with Noomi Rapace and find out…

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The King’s Speech, actor Geoffrey Rush

DP/30 – A favorite to earn his second Oscar for his work in The King’s Speech, Geoffrey Rush talks about his life, career, the film, and a little bit o’ Pirates 4 with David Poland.

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Hereafter, actor Cecile de France

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Hereafter, writer Peter Morgan

I really like Peter Morgan. I like his work, but I also find that I really like the guy. This DP/30, which goes about 40 minutes, including a dissertation by me on the state of the internet (because he asked), makes it pretty clear why. No bullshit. He talks about the film and its rough…

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Another Year, director Mike Leigh

DP/30 – The legendary director spends 30 minutes talking Another Year, his actors, why he doesn’t like to talk about his process, and his love of all kinds of movies.

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Nowhere Boy, director Sam Taylor-Wood

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Nowhere Boy, actor Aaron Johnson

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Matt Reeves, director Let Me In

DP/30 – Let Me In director Matt Reeves asks the musical question, “Why bother?” when it comes to his new film, a remake of an instant arthouse classic. And the answer may be the best ad for the film yet. That and more…

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Tamara Drewe, actors Gemma Arterton & Luke Evans

DP/30 – Tamara Drewe stars Gemma Arterton & Luke Evans chat about the film and about their ascending movie careers. (Also see Tamara Drewe’s director, Stephen Frears’s DP/30 interview here.)

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Stone, director John Curran

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I have a license to carry in New York. Can you believe that? Nobody knows that, [Applause] somebody attacks, somebody attacks me, oh, they’re gonna be shot. Can you imagine? Somebody says, oh, it is Trump, he’s easy pickings what do you say? Right? Oh, boy. What was the famous movie? No. Remember, no remember where he went around and he sort of after his wife was hurt so badly and kill. What?  I — Honestly, Yeah, right, it’s true, but you have many of them. Famous movie. Somebody. You have many of them. Charles Bronson right the late great Charles Bronson name of the movie come on.  , remember that? Ah, we’re gonna cut you up, sir, we’re gonna cut you up, uh-huh.

Bing!

One of the great movies. Charles Bronson, great, Charles Bronson. Great movies. Today you can’t make that movie because it’s not politically correct, right? It’s not politically correct. But could you imagine with Trump? Somebody says, oh, all these big monsters aren’t around he’s easy pickings and then shoot.”
~ Donald Trump

“The scene opens the new movie. It was something Ridley Scott told me a long time ago, when I was on my eighth draft of Blade Runner. He thinks it’s my fault, which it probably is, but it’s also his fault, because he kept coming up with new ideas. This time, he said to me, “What did Deckard do before he was doing this?” I said, “He was doing what he was doing, but not on such a high level. He was retiring androids that weren’t quite like Nexus Sixes, like Nexus Fives, kind of dumb androids.” He said, “So, why don’t we start the movie like that?” He always had a new beginning he wanted to try. Let’s start it on a train, let’s start it on a plane. Let’s start in the snow. Let’s start in the desert. I was writing all that. He said, “What if Deckard is retiring an old version of Nexus?” Right away I was feeling him, like fate, and he said, “There’s a cabin, with soup bubbling on the stove …” When he said soup boiling on the stove, I said, “Don’t say any more! Let me get home.” I wrote a scene that night. Just three or four pages. Deckard retires this not-very-bright droid, and you feel sorry for him. It’s like Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men. It’s just those two guys, with Deckard as the George character and the droid as the Lennie, and Deckard doesn’t want to do it. But then the droid gets mad, and then Deckard has to do it. The audience thinks he killed someone—he reaches into the guy’s mouth and pulls off his whole jaw and we see it says made by tyrell industries or whatever. I wrote that scene and took it to Ridley. I was proud of it. I remember standing and watching him read the whole thing. He loved it, but no. There are a lot of scenes that didn’t get in, but I never forgot that one. I wrote it as the beginning to this new short story called “The Shape of the Final Dog.” I’d always wanted to have a dog that wasn’t real, so I wrote one into the scene at the cabin. After Deckard retires the droid, he’s getting ready to take off and he wants the dog to come with him. The dog rolls over and keeps barking with his mouth closed. The dog’s an android dog. I thought, If there’s ever a new Blade Runner, we’ll have to use this scene. Three weeks go by, and I’m working on the story and it’s ready to hand in. The phone rings. Someone with a posh English accent says, “Would you be available in ten minutes for a call with Ridley Scott?” These people are so important they don’t waste their time on voicemail. I said, “I’ll be here.” Ten minutes go by and Ridley calls. “Hampton! Did you know, I think we’ve got it together to do Blade Runner a second time?” I said, “You finally got so hard up you’re calling me.” I knew they’d been looking for a year. People had been telling me, “You’ve got to call Ridley,” but I was a little chagrined or embarrassed. I thought, He’ll call me if he wants. Ridley said, “We’re interested in whether you have any ideas.” I said, “Funny you should ask that question. Let me read you a paragraph.” I walk over there with the phone and I read him the opening paragraph. And he says, “Fuck me. Can you come to London tomorrow?”
~ Hampton Fancher