DP/30 Archive for October, 2010

Unstoppable, director Tony Scott

DP/30 – At 66, Tony Scott is still one of the industry’s envelope-pushing visual stylists. But as you will hear in this conversation, his priorities start with story. We talk about his new film, Unstoppable, and many others from his career, including his first, The Hunger, and his fear of Deneuve & Bowie.

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DP/30: Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, actor Noomi Rapace

DP/30 – She’s one of the current IT Girls of Hollywood, scoring a supporting role in the next Sherlock Holmes film, as well as being seriously considered for the role of Ripley in the Alien prequel. How did this actress get from Stockholm to The Movie City? Spend 30 minutes with Noomi Rapace and find out…

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The King’s Speech, actor Geoffrey Rush

DP/30 – A favorite to earn his second Oscar for his work in The King’s Speech, Geoffrey Rush talks about his life, career, the film, and a little bit o’ Pirates 4 with David Poland.

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Hereafter, actor Cecile de France

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Hereafter, writer Peter Morgan

I really like Peter Morgan. I like his work, but I also find that I really like the guy. This DP/30, which goes about 40 minutes, including a dissertation by me on the state of the internet (because he asked), makes it pretty clear why. No bullshit. He talks about the film and its rough…

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Another Year, director Mike Leigh

DP/30 – The legendary director spends 30 minutes talking Another Year, his actors, why he doesn’t like to talk about his process, and his love of all kinds of movies.

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Nowhere Boy, director Sam Taylor-Wood

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Nowhere Boy, actor Aaron Johnson

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Matt Reeves, director Let Me In

DP/30 – Let Me In director Matt Reeves asks the musical question, “Why bother?” when it comes to his new film, a remake of an instant arthouse classic. And the answer may be the best ad for the film yet. That and more…

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Tamara Drewe, actors Gemma Arterton & Luke Evans

DP/30 – Tamara Drewe stars Gemma Arterton & Luke Evans chat about the film and about their ascending movie careers. (Also see Tamara Drewe’s director, Stephen Frears’s DP/30 interview here.)

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Stone, director John Curran

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DP/30

Quote Unquotesee all »

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda