DP/30 Archive for September, 2010

The King’s Speech actor Colin Firth

DP/30 chat with the title star of The King’s Speech, one of the hottest titles coming out of TIFF ’10.

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You Again director Andy Fickman

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DP/13 – Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps actor Shia LaBeouf

It’s Shia. It’s iPhone. It’s not pretty. But worth watching for the Shia experience and some interesting insights into how he got into the WS2 role.

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DP/30 @ TIFF ’10: Henry’s Crime actors Keanu Reeves, James Caan, Vera Farmiga

DP/30 – The stars of the unexpected TIFF hit get together to chat with David Poland about making the film.

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DP/30: State of the Union – Christine Vachon, producer

The queen of Killer Films, Christine Vachon, sits on a corner in Toronto with David Poland and talks about the indie industry, where she’s at (including a 5-part mini-series for HBO, Todd Haynes’ Mildred Pierce) and where we all might be going. (Watch out for passing buses!).

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Catfish directors Henry Joost & Ariel Schulman, star Nev Schulman

DP/30 – The dynamic trio of filmmaker/subjects from the Sundance sensation Catfish talk with David Poland about how and why they made the film.

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Never Let Me Go, screenwriter Alex Garland & novelist Kazuo Ishiguro

DP/30 – A chat with the two wordsmiths behind Never Let Me Go, screenwriter Alex Garland & novelist Kazuo Ishiguro

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Never Let Me Go actors Carey Mulligan & Andrew Garfield

DP/30: Carey Mulligan and Andrew Garfield chat with David Poland about their new film (some spoilers)

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Never Let Me Go director Mark Romanek

THERE WILL BE SPOILERS!

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Bright Star, director Jane Campion, actor Ben Whishaw (TIFF ’09)

The complete version of this interview got lost in the shuffle. Apologies. Never too late, I guess.

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Heartbreaker, director Pascal Chaumeil actors Romain Duris and Vanessa Paradis

DP/30 chats up the director and 2 stars of this runaway French hit.

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Tamara Drewe, dir Stephen Frears

At 69, Stephen Frears is one of the oldest working directors and one of the most prolific of any age. This year, he decided to take on the adult graphic novel, Tamara Drewe. He’s making the fest circuit with the film, but took 30 minutes to chat with David Poland about the film and a life in cinema.

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EASY A, actor Emma Stone, director Will Gluck

In anticipation of their film’s launch at the Toronto Film Festival, director Will Gluck and budding superstar Emma Stone chat with David Poland. (DP/30 now in living color… and it streams!)

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DP/30

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch