MCN Columnists
Mike Wilmington

Wilmington By Mike WilmingtonWilmington@moviecitynews.com

Wilmington on Movies: Prince of Persia: Sands of Time, Sex and the City 2 and MacGruber…

Prince of Persia: Sands of Time (Three Stars) U.S.; Mike Newell, 2010 Prince of Persia, which is probably one of the best-looking Arabian fantasy movies ever, is also unfortunately

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Wilmington on Movies: Shrek Forever After, Looking for Eric and Father of My Children …

Shrek Forever After (Three Stars) U.S.; Mike Mitchell, 2010 Shrek Forever After is supposedly “The Final Chapter.” But that title may be making false promises.

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Wilmington on Movies: Robin Hood and Just Wright…

Robin Hood (Three and a Half Stars) U.S.; Ridley Scott, 2010 “To live outside the law, you must be honest,“ Bob Dylan once sang

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Wilmington on Movies: Iron Man 2, Babies and Mother and Child…

Iron Man 2 (Two and a Half Stars) U.S.; Jon Favreau What would we have thought back in the 1960s, if someone had told us that

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Wilmington

Quote Unquotesee all »

A statement from David Chase’s representative, Leslee Dart:

A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying,“ Tony Soprano is not dead,” is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, “Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.” To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of THE SOPRANOS raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.
~ David Chase Refutes Vox Writer

“By the time the sounds of the Von Trapp children warbling ‘Silent Night’ drift through The Giver, you may find yourself wondering what fresh movie hell this is. In truth, the enervating hash of dystopian dread, vague religiosity and commercial advertising-style uplift is nothing if not stale. Adapted from Lois Lowry’s book for young readers, the story involves an isolated society that, with its cubistic dwellings, mindless smiles, monochromatic environs and nebulous communitarianism, seem modeled on a Scandinavian country or an old Mentos commercial.”
~ Manohla Dargis’ Deadly Lede For Review Of The Giver