MCN Columnists
Mike Wilmington

Wilmington By Mike WilmingtonWilmington@moviecitynews.com

Wilmington on Movies: Cop Out, The Crazies, A Prophet, North Face and The Ghost Writer (revisited)

Cop Out (One and a Half Stars) U. S.; Kevin Smith, 2010 Cop Out is one movie where you can tell what went wrong just by looking at the trailer. The

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Wilmington on Movies: Shutter Island, The Ghost Writer and Ajami

Shutter Island (Four Stars) U.S.; Martin Scorsese, 2010 Shutter Island, Martin Scorsese’s new film, is a horror movie for aficionados, who like to be scared and not have to check their brains in the lobby. It‘s for moviegoers who’ve had their fill of the current

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Wilmington on Movies: Valentine’s Day and Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief

Valentine‘s Day (One and a Half Stars) U.S.; Garry Marshall, 2009 Lonely on Valentine’s Day? Hollywood has your number. They’re holding tickets (or at least one ticket) to director Garry Marshall’s appropriately titled Feb-12-14 weekend release Valentine’s Day — an all-star Angeleno big-movie box of flavorless

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Wilmington

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“The city to me is the only possible vehicle we have to measure human achievement. We’re an urban species now. If you look at Karachi or Mexico City or Hong Kong or London or New York or Yonkers or Baltimore or any of these other places, the pastoral is now a part of human history. We’re either going to figure out how to live together in these increasingly crowded, increasingly multi-cultural population centers or we’re not. We’re either going to get great at this or we’re going to fail as a species.”
~ David Simon

“I wondered how different it would be to write a novel and it’s totally different. It’s very internal. The weird thing about it is that I found that novel-writing was much more like directing than it is like screenwriting. You’re casting it, you’re lighting it, you’re doing the costumes, you’re doing the locations, you’re doing it all yourself as a director would. In screenwriting, you don’t do that stuff. You don’t describe the face of the actor or the character when you’re writing a screenplay because Tom Cruise is going to do it and he doesn’t look like that, whereas in the novel to describe what he is is what he is. The actual act of writing, just like shooting on a set, is a slow slog. It’s going to work every day.”
~ David Cronenberg On Screenplay vs. Novel