MCN Columnists
Mike Wilmington

Wilmington By Mike WilmingtonWilmington@moviecitynews.com

Me and Orson Welles Red Cliff, The Road, and Ninja Assassi

Me and Orson Welles, Red Cliff, The Road, and Ninja Assassin Me and Orson Welles (Three and a Half Stars) U.S.; Richard Linklater, 2009 In Me and Orson Welles, Richard Linklater, a director whose films I usually like, takes on a highly ambitious subject that really appeals to me — a portrayal of the astonishing…

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Wilmington on DVDs Three Monkeys , Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Angels & Demons, Funny People, and more…

PICK OF THE WEEK: NEW Three Monkeys (Three and a Half Stars) Turkey/France/Italy; Nuri Bilge Ceylan, 2008 (Zeitgeist Films) Nuri Bilge Ceylan, the brilliant Turkish cineaste (Distant, Climates), whose exquisite visual tableaus, minimalist plots and flair for long dramatic silences, irresistibly recall the heyday of Michelangelo Antonioni, here offers more plot than usual, in the…

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Wilmington on DVDs: Star Trek, Gone with the Wind, The Exiles, Fight Club, Humpday and more…

PICK OF THE WEEK: NEW Star Trek (Three and a Half Stars) U.S.; J. J. Abrams, 2009 The latest Star Trek movie, called simply Star Trek, is a genuine audience-pleaser, a film that

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Wilmington on DVDs: Up, Wings of Desire, The General, Heat, The Ugly Truth, Mamma Mia!, Monsters, Inc. and more…

PICK OF THE WEEK: NEW Up (Four Stars) U. S.; Pete Docter, 2009 Up, this year’s new Pixar picture, flies

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Wilmington on DVDs: Food, Inc., North By Northwest, Forrest Gump, It’s a Wonderful Life, The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 and more…

PICK OF THE WEEK: NEW Food, Inc. (Three and a Half Stars) U. S.; Robert Kenner, 2009 (Magnolia) Do you really know everything you should about the food you eat?

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Wilmington

Quote Unquotesee all »

Who are the critics speaking to?
Nobody seems able to answer the question of how you can make theatre criticism more appealing, more clickworthy. One answer is to be a goddamn flamethrower every week, be a bombthrower, to write scorched-earth reviews. Just be completely hedonistic and ego-driven in your criticism, become a master stylist, and treat everything in front of you onstage as fodder for your most delicious and vicious language. That’s one road. And people may enjoy your writing. The thing that’s sacrificed is any sense of a larger responsibility, and any aesthetic consistency. I don’t think anyone is following that model right now—just being a complete jerk.

Well, Rex Reed is still writing.
Ah. Well, you can also be a standard bearer, and insist that work doesn’t measure up to your high standards. But I think the art makes the standards. I’m not going to sit there and say, “This is the way you do Shakespeare.” I believe that every play establishes its own standards, and our job is to just evaluate it. But everybody’s looking for the formula for how to talk about culture so that people who don’t have any time to read want to read about it. Is there something beyond thumbs-up, thumbs-down criticism? I would hope there’s a way to talk about a theatre event in real time—meaning while it’s still going on—in a way that’s engaging, funny, witty, and evaluates the elements of the thing. But it’s like if you had a friend who was like, “Gee, are you working out? You look great. But that’s a terrible haircut.” Nobody wants that person around.
~ Time Out’s 17-Year Theatre Critic, David Cote, Upon His Exit

“Now I am awake to the world. I was asleep before. When they slaughtered Congress, we didn’t wake up. When they blamed terrorists and suspended the Constitution, we didn’t wake up either. They said it would be temporary. Nothing changes instantaneously. In a gradually heating bathtub you’d be boiled to death before you knew it.”
“The Handmaid’s Tale,” Bruce Miller