Z
MCN Columnists
Mike Wilmington

Wilmington By Mike WilmingtonWilmington@moviecitynews.com

Wilmington on DVDs: Slumdog Millionaire, Danton, Il Generale Della Rovere and more …

PICK OF THE WEEK: NEW Slumdog Millionaire (Three-and-a-Half Stars) U.K./India; Danny Boyle Slumdog Millionaire is a dancing, crackling shockwave of a movie, an incandescent

Read the full article »

Wilmington on DVDs: A Secret, Dodes’ka-den, L’Innocente and more … plus, this week’s box set

PICK OF THE WEEK: NEW A Secret (Un Secret) (Three-and-a-Half Stars) France; Claude Miller, 2007 (Strand Releasing) The young French film critic Francois Truffaut used to snipe at the obvious craftsmanship and overt

Read the full article »

Wilmington on DVDs: Synecdoche, NY, Faust and more …plus, this week’s box set

PICK OF THE WEEK: NEW Synecdoche, New York (Three-and-a-Half Stars) U. S.; Charlie Kaufman, 2008 (Sony) Synecdoche (def.): A figure of speech where the whole is used for

Read the full article »

Wilmington on DVDs: Pinocchio, Milk, Happy-Go-Lucky and more … plus, this week’s box set

PICK OF THE WEEK: CLASSICS Pinocchio (Two Discs) (Four Stars) U.S.; Ben Sharpsteen, Hamilton Luske 1940 (Walt Disney) When you wish upon a star…. A little wooden-boy puppet named Pinocchio

Read the full article »

Wilmington on DVDs: Australia, Beatrix Potter, and more… plus, this week’s box set

PICKS OF THE WEEK: NEW Australia (Four Stars) (A) Australia/U.K.; Baz Luhrmann, 2008 (20th Century Fox) Over the top it may be, sport, but Baz (Moulin Rouge!) Luhrmann’s visually scrumptious, rousing epic of WW2-era Australia unbound, was one of my favorite movies of 2008.

Read the full article »

Wilmington

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

Z Z