MCN Columnists
Douglas Pratt

The Ultimate DVD Geek By Douglas PrattPratt@moviecitynews.com

Watchmen: Director’s Cut

The theatrical release was a disappointment, but that has nothing to do with the much longer and immensely satisfying Warner Home Video release,Watchmen Director’s Cut. Directed by Zack Snyder, the 186-minute feature is a two-generation epic comic book movie that works on almost every level. It does not have the giddy momentum of the deserved mega…

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Waltz with Bashir

The greatest so far untapped potential in all of cinema is the animated documentary. The genre got off to a rousing start with Winsor McCay’s contemporary 1918 depiction of the sinking of the Lusitania, but virtually nothing has followed up that effort beyond a few educational programs such as Frank Capra’s Hemo the Magnificent. In 2008, however, there…

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The Ultimate DVD Geek

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“I love it! Shia’s crazy and he’s great. It’s a good combination for me. I don’t know if he’s going to jump up and attack me, or the camera, or the actor, and I kind of enjoy that. He brings something unexpected, all the time. A little frightening, a little grey, so I really enjoy that kind of madness. I think he takes this work very serious, really serious, and sometimes maybe that comes across arrogant or annoying, and I understand that. But it’s nice when someone cares so much. I don’t know how easy it is to be a big movie star, I’ll never understand that world, but to show up and care that much, to me, is a nice deal and I’ll take it. With all the craziness.”
~ Dito Montiel On Shia Labeouf

“Zadie Smith said to me years ago, ‘Everything we think of as literary culture will be gone in a generation and a half.’ She said, ‘It will last your time, but it won’t last mine.’ I don’t think it will ever disappear, but it will shrink. It will go back to what it was when I started out, which is a minority interest sphere, which some people happen to be very interested in. What happened as I see it is that the newspapers got bigger and bigger, and they were casting about for people to write about, and they ran out of people until they found themselves writing about writers—the people they hate most, certainly in England. And then suddenly, writers were much more famous than they used to be. When I started out, you wrote your novel, you sent it in, it was published, it got reviewed. But none of the other stuff. No interviews, no tours, no readings, no panels, no photographs, no TV, no radio, all that came with this higher profile, higher visibility. I think it will go back to something like what it was.”
~ Martin Amis