MCN Columnists
Leonard Klady

Klady By Leonard KladyKlady@moviecitynews.com

21 or Bust…

The card counting added up to an estimated $24.1 million as the debut of 21 ascended to the top of weekend movie going. The solid bow coupled with a better than expected $9.4 million opening for Superhero Movie still could not stave off another box office erosion as the movie experience hunkers down in the…

Read the full article »

Easter Lays an Egg…

The second weekend of Horton Hears a Who led weekend film going but not as definitively as it had in its debut. The Seussical sophomore session rang up an estimated $25.3 million while the debut of Meet the Browns from niche auteurTyler Perry was within striking distance at $20.2 million. The Easter weekend (not one…

Read the full article »

Who’s On First…

Doc Seuss’s Horton Hears a Who translated best to the big screen audience this past weekend with an estimated $45.3 million. It was sloppy seconds for the frame’s two other national freshmen with the teen martial arts yarn Never Back Down generating a respectable $8.8 million to rank third overall and the Apocalyptic adventure Doomsday…

Read the full article »

35.1 Million B.C. (Big Cume)…

History be damned, 10,000 B.C. went to the head of the class with an opening weekend estimated at $35.1 million. In an otherwise depressed frame, there was also positive spin for College Road Trip that debuted in second spot with $13.8 million and a rather respectable $5.4 million launch for the ripped from the headlines…

Read the full article »

So What!?

Wednesday morning Motion Picture Association of America president Dan Glickman got on the phone with (by my count) 15 or so entertainment business journalists. He told them a few things they probably knew, a lot they could have guessed and a panoply of things of no great significance. The seeming important news was that the domestic…

Read the full article »

Semi-Po’ and Con…

Despite topping the weekend box office chart with an estimated by $15.4 million, Semi-Pro provided slim comfort in a depressed post-Oscar frame. No Country for Old Men added close to 1000 theaters and saw its revenues rise 63% but other winners saw no immediate benefit in the domestic arena. The frame also saw a strong…

Read the full article »

Klady

Quote Unquotesee all »

DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato