MCN Columnists
Leonard Klady

Columns By Leonard KladyKlady@moviecitynews.com

The Number 911…

February 25, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Despite a not unexpected 57% box office decline, Ghost Rider continued to hold the top spot on weekend movie going charts with an estimated $19.5 million gross. The frame saw a quartet of new openers but none rated better than passable commercial grades. The chiller The Number 23 ranked…

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Ghost Rider In The Sky …

February 19, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Despite a plethora of product, Ghost Rider ascended with a super heroic gross estimated at $53.2 million. The film shattered all previous Presidents Day holiday openings and propelled the frame to record revenues. It was also generally upbeat news for a quartet of freshmen entries. The family…

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Bit By Norbit …

February 11, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The audience Norbit hard with the Eddie Murphy comedy commanding the weekend with an estimated $33.3 million. The strong bow nonetheless allowed Hannibal Rising to chomp down on a sizeable $12.9 million gross in a frame that rebounded from the Super Bowl but still lagged behind last year’s post performance….

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90 Million American Can’t Be Wrong …

February 4 , 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The Messengers didn’t require Western Union to top weekend movie going charts with an estimated $14.8 million. The horror yarn was followed by another freshman entry - Because I Said So – that grossed $13.1 million. Otherwise it was a relatively quiet frame with distributors giving a…

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Columns

Quote Unquotesee all »

DEADLINE: How does a visualist feel about people watching your films on a phone or VOD?
REFN: It depends on what kind of movie you make. We had great success with Only God Forgives on multiple platforms in the U.S. Young people will decide how they see it, when they want to see it. Don’t try to fight it. Embrace it. That’s a wonderful opportunity. We’re at the most exciting time since the invention of the wheel, in terms of creativity because distribution and accessibility have changed everything. A camera is still a camera whether it’s digital or not; there’s still sound; an actor is an actor. Ninety-nine percent of what you do is going to be seen on a smart phone – I know this is the greatest thing ever made because it allows people to choose, watching what you do on this format or go into a theater and see it on a screen. That means more people than ever will see what I do, which is personally satisfying in terms of vanity. But you have to be able to adapt, to accept things in different order and length than we’re used to. We are in a very, very exciting time.
~ Nic Refn to Jen Yamato

DEADLINE: You mention Tarantino, who with Christopher Nolan and a few other giants, saved film stock from extinction. To him, showing a digital film in a theater is the equivalent of watching TV in public. Make an argument for why digital is a good film making canvas.
REFN: Costwise, it’s a very effective way for young people to start making movies. You can make your movie on an iPhone. It’s wonderful seeing how my own children use technology to enhance creativity. For me it’s a wonderful canvas. Sure, I love grain in film. I love celluloid. But I also like creativity. I like crayons, I like pencils, I like paint. It’s all relative. Technology is more inclusive. A hundred years ago when film was invented, it was an elitist club. Very few people got to make it, very few people controlled it and very few people owned it. A hundred years later, storytelling through images is everyone’s domain. It’s ultimate capitalism. There are no rules, and no barriers and no Hays Code. Where does this go in another hundred years? I don’t know but I would love to see it.
~ Nic Refn To Jen Yamato