MCN Columnists
Leonard Klady

Columns By Leonard KladyKlady@moviecitynews.com

The Number 911…

February 25, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Despite a not unexpected 57% box office decline, Ghost Rider continued to hold the top spot on weekend movie going charts with an estimated $19.5 million gross. The frame saw a quartet of new openers but none rated better than passable commercial grades. The chiller The Number 23 ranked…

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Ghost Rider In The Sky …

February 19, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Despite a plethora of product, Ghost Rider ascended with a super heroic gross estimated at $53.2 million. The film shattered all previous Presidents Day holiday openings and propelled the frame to record revenues. It was also generally upbeat news for a quartet of freshmen entries. The family…

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Bit By Norbit …

February 11, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The audience Norbit hard with the Eddie Murphy comedy commanding the weekend with an estimated $33.3 million. The strong bow nonetheless allowed Hannibal Rising to chomp down on a sizeable $12.9 million gross in a frame that rebounded from the Super Bowl but still lagged behind last year’s post performance….

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90 Million American Can’t Be Wrong …

February 4 , 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The Messengers didn’t require Western Union to top weekend movie going charts with an estimated $14.8 million. The horror yarn was followed by another freshman entry – Because I Said So – that grossed $13.1 million. Otherwise it was a relatively quiet frame with distributors giving a…

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Columns

【14時までのご注文は即日発送】04-0017 03 48サイズ JILL STUART NEW YORK (ジルスチュアート ニュ on: Wilmington on DVDs: House of Wax (1953); After Earth; The Purge

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【ポイント最大26倍】ドクターシーラボ 2015年スペシャルバッグ<Dr.Ci:Labo/ on: Wilmington on DVDs: House of Wax (1953); After Earth; The Purge

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Bob Kanter on: The DVD Wrapup: 100-Year-Old Man, Strangerland, La Grande Bouffe, Troma’s War, Hackers, The Rebel, 17 and more

Hugo on: The DVD Wrapup: Woman in Gold, Clouds of Sils Maria, Human Capital, House of Cards and more

Quote Unquotesee all »

“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick