MCN Columnists
Leonard Klady

Columns By Leonard KladyKlady@moviecitynews.com

The Number 911…

February 25, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Despite a not unexpected 57% box office decline, Ghost Rider continued to hold the top spot on weekend movie going charts with an estimated $19.5 million gross. The frame saw a quartet of new openers but none rated better than passable commercial grades. The chiller The Number 23 ranked…

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Ghost Rider In The Sky …

February 19, 2007 Weekend Finals Domestic Market Share Despite a plethora of product, Ghost Rider ascended with a super heroic gross estimated at $53.2 million. The film shattered all previous Presidents Day holiday openings and propelled the frame to record revenues. It was also generally upbeat news for a quartet of freshmen entries. The family…

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Bit By Norbit …

February 11, 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The audience Norbit hard with the Eddie Murphy comedy commanding the weekend with an estimated $33.3 million. The strong bow nonetheless allowed Hannibal Rising to chomp down on a sizeable $12.9 million gross in a frame that rebounded from the Super Bowl but still lagged behind last year’s post performance….

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90 Million American Can’t Be Wrong …

February 4 , 2007 Weekend Estimates Domestic Market Share The Messengers didn’t require Western Union to top weekend movie going charts with an estimated $14.8 million. The horror yarn was followed by another freshman entry – Because I Said So – that grossed $13.1 million. Otherwise it was a relatively quiet frame with distributors giving a…

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Columns

Quote Unquotesee all »

“People react primarily to direct experience and not to abstractions; it is very rare to find anyone who can become emotionally involved with an abstraction. The longer the bomb is around without anything happening, the better the job that people do in psychologically denying its existence. It has become as abstract as the fact that we are all going to die someday, which we usually do an excellent job of denying. For this reason, most people have very little interest in nuclear war. It has become even less interesting as a problem than, say, city government, and the longer a nuclear event is postponed, the greater becomes the illusion that we are constantly building up security, like interest at the bank. As time goes on, the danger increases, I believe, because the thing becomes more and more remote in people’s minds. No one can predict the panic that suddenly arises when all the lights go out — that indefinable something that can make a leader abandon his carefully laid plans. A lot of effort has gone into trying to imagine possible nuclear accidents and to protect against them. But whether the human imagination is really capable of encompassing all the subtle permutations and psychological variants of these possibilities, I doubt. The nuclear strategists who make up all those war scenarios are never as inventive as reality, and political and military leaders are never as sophisticated as they think they are.”
~ Stanley Kubrick

“You can’t make films about something the audience knows nothing about. The trick is getting the audience to tell their own stories in the story so that they know what will happen. And then, just before they get bored, you must surprise them and move the story in a new direction.”
~ Mogens Rukov

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