The Top Tens Archive for December, 2010

Top Tens: December 31, 2010

There were a couple of technical glitches as the new system settles in – but the lists are starting to add up now. Yes, Social Network stays on top, but Inception and The King’s Speech are moving up the charts.

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The Top Tens: December 24, 2010

The lists keep coming in, but the chart remains (almost) the same. Carlos and The Ghost Writer move up a notch, and the top five stay locked in place. The Social Network stays on top by a wide, wide margin.

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The Top Tens: December 22, 2010

No surprises so far – The Social Network still dominates the top of the list with Winter’s Bone a strong second. The King’s Speech and 127 Hours are back into the top ten and Toy Story is moving up slow and steady.

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The Top Tens: December 17, 2010

With almost 50 lists in, The Social Network still sits on top, but Winter’s Bone is gaining ground. Futher down the list, Black Swan dances into third, Toy Story 3 stays steady in fourth, with Carlos nipping at its heels.

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Top Tens: December 13, 2010

The Social Network sits alone at the top of the chart, with Inception, Winter’s Bone and Toy Story 3 battling it out in the next three spots. But it’s still early in the race…

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Critics Top Tens 2010 (as of Dec 9)

The first Top Ten lists of 2010 are coming in. For the next couple of weeks, MCN will be updating daily as we aggregate lists from all parts of the critical community.

With just 6 lists in, Nolan and Fincher are duking it out for the top slot…

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“I wondered how different it would be to write a novel and it’s totally different. It’s very internal. The weird thing about it is that I found that novel-writing was much more like directing than it is like screenwriting. You’re casting it, you’re lighting it, you’re doing the costumes, you’re doing the locations, you’re doing it all yourself as a director would. In screenwriting, you don’t do that stuff. You don’t describe the face of the actor or the character when you’re writing a screenplay because Tom Cruise is going to do it and he doesn’t look like that, whereas in the novel to describe what he is is what he is. The actual act of writing, just like shooting on a set, is a slow slog. It’s going to work every day.”
~ David Cronenberg On Screenplay vs. Novel

“I was fortunate to be in the two big film epics of the last part of the 20th century: Godfather and “Lonesome Dove” on television, which was my favorite part. That’s my “Hamlet.” The English have Shakespeare; the French, Molière. In Argentina, they have Borges, but the western is ours. I like that.”
~ Robert Duvall