The Top Tens Archive for December, 2010

Top Tens: December 31, 2010

There were a couple of technical glitches as the new system settles in – but the lists are starting to add up now. Yes, Social Network stays on top, but Inception and The King’s Speech are moving up the charts.

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The Top Tens: December 24, 2010

The lists keep coming in, but the chart remains (almost) the same. Carlos and The Ghost Writer move up a notch, and the top five stay locked in place. The Social Network stays on top by a wide, wide margin.

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The Top Tens: December 22, 2010

No surprises so far – The Social Network still dominates the top of the list with Winter’s Bone a strong second. The King’s Speech and 127 Hours are back into the top ten and Toy Story is moving up slow and steady.

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The Top Tens: December 17, 2010

With almost 50 lists in, The Social Network still sits on top, but Winter’s Bone is gaining ground. Futher down the list, Black Swan dances into third, Toy Story 3 stays steady in fourth, with Carlos nipping at its heels.

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Top Tens: December 13, 2010

The Social Network sits alone at the top of the chart, with Inception, Winter’s Bone and Toy Story 3 battling it out in the next three spots. But it’s still early in the race…

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Critics Top Tens 2010 (as of Dec 9)

The first Top Ten lists of 2010 are coming in. For the next couple of weeks, MCN will be updating daily as we aggregate lists from all parts of the critical community.

With just 6 lists in, Nolan and Fincher are duking it out for the top slot…

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“The purpose of film isn’t to present the kindness of the world.”
~ Isabelle Huppert

The Promised Land steers into the fact that the United States can mean whatever people want it to mean. You may not be able to be Elvis, but you can sure as shit impersonate him for a living. America, like its current President (at least as of this article’s publication), is so dangerous precisely because it’s a blank canvas on which anyone can project their dreams. Whatever it is that you see for yourself, there’s someone you can pay for the pleasure of believing that it’s possible. In his view, the pursuit of happiness is the ultimate con, a delusion that prevents us from seeing our circumstances for what they are.

“Forget the Matrix, it’s the invention of happiness that blinded us to the truth. The rich got richer and the poor help them do it. Jarecki doesn’t argue that the American Dream is dead; he argues that it was never alive in the first place — that we were all lobsters in a pot full of water that was boiling too slowly for any of us to notice. And now it’s time for dinner. Donald J. Trump is the President of the United States. Elvis has left the building.”
~ David Ehrlich