Gurus o’ Gold Archive for February, 2011

Gurus o Gold… The FINAL Last Minute Changes (Round 3)

If you are interested in some last minute changes of heart in Doc, Short Doc, and Live Action Short, you’ve found the right link.

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Gurus o Gold… Last Minute Changes (Round 2)

The Last Full Gurus Chart Last Minute Changes (Round One) Gregory Ellwood Best Documentary Feature * Inside Job – 1 Best documentary short subject * The Warriors of Qiugang – 1 Best live action short film * Na Wewe – 1 Original screenplay * The King’s Speech – 1 Pete Hammond BEST DIRECTOR: David Fincher…

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Gurus o’ Last Minute Changes (Round 1)

Here are 10 last minutes changes that Gurus would like to make to their
final ballots
.

We’ll be back on Thursday and then again on Saturday if there are any more last second flashes of insight!

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Gurus o’ Gold – What Would The Oscars Look Like As Of Today?

All the Gurus votes are now in for the last round of voting the complete list of categories. Oscar ballots are due in by Tuesday.

The last group of votes put Melissa Leo back at the top of her category. What other surprises will there be… if The Gurus are right, 8 days from the show?

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Gurus o’ Gold – The Final Ballot, pt 3 of 3

In the last round of the last vote, the Gurus hand four Oscars to Inception, matching The King’s Speech’s four, The Social Network’s three and True Grit’s two. But are The Gurus the boss of The Academy?

We’ll know in nine days.

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Gurus o’ Gold – The Final Ballot, pt 2 of 3

We got your doc categories, your editor, your music, your make-up, your foreign language, and your animated short.

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Gurus o’ Gold – The Final Ballot, pt 1 of 3

The Gurus are handing in their final ballots in all categories. Any big changes? Well, one category in the Top 8 has a new leader. And a few races have tightened up. The campaigns that have attacked Phase II aggressively have made some inroads, at least with The Gurus. More categories tomorrow…

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Gurus o’ Gold: Has Anything Changed This Week?

As voting continues, The Gurus are asked, “Anything? Anything?”

And the answer is…

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Gurus o’ Gold – February 3, 2011

This week, the Gurus offer their view of the Best Picture race. (Not much happening there.)

Also, what are the most likely upsets on the big night? You’ll have to look for yourselves, but ladies first.

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Gurus o' Gold

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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