Gurus o’ Gold Archive for December, 2010

Gurus o’ Gold: Last Licks 2010

With overwhelming domination of the Critics Groups, The Social Network overtakes The King’s Speech for the top spot by 1 point. The other mover is Black Swan, which leaps from #7 to #4.

And The Gurus bid a fond farewell to Sean Smith, off to do serious things with his life. And we ring in the New Year with Anthony Breznican flipping to Entertainment Weekly from USA Today. The more things change…

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Gurus o’ Golden Globes, Post-Nominations

The Gurus came through Globes Day with a new appreciation for The Fighter and worries about True Grit.

Also, with Globes nods in, a look at the Picture and Acting categories. Jolie, Berry, Wahlberg & Kunis all got nods without a single Gurus guessing they would. So what now? (And the ranking of the rest of the movie categories coming soon.)

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Gurus o’ GIobes Gold: Dec 10, 2010

The only real action in the Oscar race this week is The Gurus moving The Town into the Top Ten.

Most of today’s Guru output looks at The Golden Globes, the award given out by 80something 80somethings and Dick Clark. The Gurus take measure like Mizrahi of all of the top 8 categories, which at The Globes, doesn’t include screenwriting or directing… though 11 Gurus have come up with 18 candidates in one category, which says it all!

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Gurus o’ Gold: True Grit Week – Episode Two

The last of the Gurus has checked in and the battles remain tight. “True Grit Week,” saw film at #4, up from #7 last week, and Top 5 slots for all three of the main actors actors and the Coens in Screenplay & Director. With 100% of Guru districts reporting, Annette Bening and Natalie Portman are within 2 points of one another in Best Actress. Duvall and Bardem still can’t crack the Top 5 in Actor. And we’ve sorted Original and Adapted Screenplays.

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Gurus o' Gold

Quote Unquotesee all »

“But okay, I promise you now that if I ever retire again, I’m going to ensure that I can’t walk it back. I’ll post a series of the most disgusting, offensive, outrageous statements you can ever imagine. That way it will be impossible for me to ever be employed again. No one is going to take my calls. No one is going to want to be seen with me. Oh, it will be scorched earth. I will have torched everything. I’m going to flame out in the most legendary fashion.”
~ Steven Soderbergh

I feel strongly connected to young cinephile culture. The thing about filmmaking—and cinephilia—is that you can’t keep hanging out with your own age group as you get older. They drop off, move somewhere. You can’t put together a crew of sixty-somethings. It’s the same for cinephilia: my original set of cinephile friends are watching DVDs at home or delving into 1958 episodes of ‘Gunsmoke,’ something like that. The people who are out there tend to be young, and I happen to be doing the same thing still, so it’s natural that I move in their circles.

In terms of the filmmaking, there was a gear shift: my first movies focused on people around my age, and I followed them for three films. Until The Unspeakable Act, I was using the same actors, not because of an affinity for people at a specific age, but because of my affinity for the actors. I like to work with actors a second time, especially if I don’t feel confident casting a new film. But The Unspeakable Act was a different script, and I had to cast all new people. Even for the older roles, I couldn’t get the people I’d worked with before. But when it was over, the same thing happened: I wanted to work with Tallie again in the worst way, and I started the process all over again.

I think Rohmer did something similar around the time of Perceval and Catherine de HeilbronnHe developed new groups of people that he liked to work with. These gear shifts are natural. Even if you want to follow certain actors to the end of their life (which I kind of do) the variety of ideas that you generate makes it necessary to change. And once you’ve made the change, you’ve got all these new people around.”
~ Dan Sallitt