Awards Watch Archive for December, 2016

Gurus o’ Gold: Doc & Foreign Faves

The Gurus are on vacation, but they left behind their thoughts about the short-list races of Feature Documentary and Foreign Language, offering up their personal preferences about both categories. And as always, Best Picture. Happy New Year to all. Oscar nomination voting starts in less than a week.

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20 Weeks To Oscar: The (Shock) Corridor

My problem with The Corridor is that the period has become desperate and grabby. The smartest and the most simplistic players are stuck playing the same game… using fake awards events (high and low) and all forms of screening/dining contraptions and terrible hackneyed advertorial that not even ad buyers expect to be read.

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Gurus o’ Gold: ChristmaChanukah Time!

The Gurus answer the question on everyone’s mind… what are the best gifts The Academy could give us this holiday season? And, as always, the latest look at Best Picture, where there isn’t a lot of change. Happy Holidays!!!

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Alliance Of Women Film Journalists Announce Tenth Annual Awards

[PR] The women have voted! The Alliance of Women Film Journalists is pleased to announce the winners of the tenth annual AWFJ EDA Awards. This year AWFJ presents EDA Awards in 25 categories, divided into three sections: the standard ‘Best Of’ section, the Female Focus awards and the irreverent EDA Special Mention awards—including Actress Most…

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336 Pictures Qualified For Oscar

LOS ANGELES, CA – Three hundred thirty-six feature films are eligible for the 2016 Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today. To be eligible for 89th Academy Awards consideration, feature films must open in a commercial motion picture theater in Los Angeles County by midnight, December 31, and begin a…

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7 FEATURES ADVANCE IN RACE FOR MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING OSCAR

LOS ANGELES, CA –The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that seven films remain in competition in the Makeup and Hairstyling category for the 89th Academy Awards®. The films are listed below in alphabetical order: “Deadpool” “The Dressmaker” “Florence Foster Jenkins” “Hail, Caesar!” “A Man Called Ove” “Star Trek Beyond” “Suicide Squad”…

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Indiana Film Journalists Vote

Indiana Film Journalists Association names “Moonlight” Best Film of 2016   “Moonlight” has been named the Best Film of 2016 by the Indiana Film Journalists Association (IFJA). The sensitive portrait of an African-American boy struggling as he grows to manhood in Miami and comes to grips with his sexuality, the drama won a total of…

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Indiana Film Journalists In The Moonlight

Indiana Film Journalists In The Moonlight

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2016 StLFCA Award Winners

[Winners Announced December 18, 2016.] Best Film: La La Land Best Director: Damien Chazelle – La La Land Best Actor: Casey Affleck – Manchester by the Sea Best Actress: Isabelle Huppert – Elle Best Supporting Actor: Mahershala Ali – Moonlight Best Supporting Actress: Viola Davis – Fences Best Original Screenplay: Hell or High Water –…

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Academy Shortlists 10 For VFX

LOS ANGELES, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that 10 films remain in the running in the Visual Effects category for the 89th Academy Awards. The films are in alphabetical order: “Arrival” “The BFG” “Captain America: Civil War” “Deepwater Horizon” “Doctor Strange” “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”…

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20 Weeks To Oscar: The Golden Goose & Those Lovely Eggs

The illusion of free will that is foisted on Phase I becomes much more real in Phase II. Because the power of narrowing choices actually shifts to the Academy voters and away from the media and the consultants.

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Chicago Film Critics Award….

  Best Supporting Actor Mahershala Ali “Moonlight” Best Original Score Mica Levi “Jackie” Best Cinematography Linus Sandgren “La La Land” Best Editing Tom Cross “La La Land” Art Direction/ Production Designer The Handmaiden (unnamed) Most Promising Performer Lucas Hedges “Manchester by the Sea” Most Promising Filmmaker Robert Eggers “The Witch” Best Supporting Actress Michelle Williams…

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28th PALM SPRINGS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES FESTIVAL LINE-UP

[PR] The festival’s opening night will be the World Premiere screening of The Sense of an Ending, directed by Ritesh Batra on Thursday, January 5.  The festival will close with The Comedian, directed by Taylor Hackford on Sunday, January 15. The Festival will screen 190 films from 72 countries, including 58 premieres (9 World, 5…

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9 FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILMS ADVANCE IN OSCAR RACE

60th anniversary of the Foreign Language Film Category     LOS ANGELES, CA – Nine features will advance to the next round of voting in the Foreign Language Film category for the 89th Academy Awards®.  Eighty-five films had originally been considered in the category. The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are: Australia, “Tanna,”…

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Gurus o’ Gold: What Films Are On The Edge & Who Will Win Golden Globes?

The Gurus tighten things up, with only 10 Best Picture picks. They ask, “What films are on the edge of being in or out of Best Picture contention?” Also, in honor of the Golden Globes nominations, The Gurus pick their winners. Only two of eight categories are unanimous, but all but Best Drama have overwhelming leads.

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Anne Thompson On How Oscar Slots The Foreign Language Shortlist

Anne Thompson On How Oscar Slots The Foreign Language Shortlist

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91 Original Songs Tune Up For Oscar

91 ORIGINAL SONGS VIE FOR 2016 OSCAR® LOS ANGELES, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that 91 songs from eligible feature-length motion pictures released in 2016 are in contention for nominations in the Original Song category for the 89th Academy Awards®. The original songs, along with the motion picture…

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20 Weeks To Oscar: #GlobesSoWhite

The other three “black” films? Fences was good enough for its two big stars of color to be nominated. Loving was good enough for its two likely Oscar nominees to be nominated. Hidden Figures was good enough for its Oscar-winning star to be nominated along with, uh, Best Score.

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New York Online Film Critics Bask In Moonlight

  PICTURE Moonlight DIRECTOR Barry Jenkins for Moonlight ACTOR Casey Affleck for Manchester by the Sea ACTRESS Isabelle Huppert for Elle   SUPPORTING ACTOR Mahershala Ali for Moonlight   SUPPORTING ACTRESS Viola Davis for Fences   SCREENPLAY Barry Jenkins for Moonlight   BREAKTHROUGH PERFORMER Ruth Negga for Loving DEBUT DIRECTOR Robert Eggers for The Witch…

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Gurus o’ Gold: Top 8 Categories A Few Days Before The Globes Nominations

Thirteen Best Picture titles have votes from more than half the voting Gurus this week, after all the movies expected to be in play, aside from Passengers, have been seen. That is the field from which 7-10 will get Best Picture nominations. Scorsese’s Silence didn’t rise… but it didn’t fall either. Denis Villeneuve, Andrew Garfield, Isabelle Huppert and Janelle Monáe are on the rise.

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin