Awards Watch Archive for June, 2014

Cara Buckley NYT’s New Awards Season “Carpetbagger”

Cara Buckley NYT’s New Awards Season “Carpetbagger”

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Academy Invites 271 New Members

Academy Invites 271 New Members, Including John Sloss, Megan Ellison, Eddie Vedder, Jennifer Lee, Jean-Claude Carrière, Chantal Akerman, Larry Gross, Olivier Assayas, Claire Denis, Hayao Miyazaki, Sally Hawkins, Josh Hutcherson, Jason Statham, Mads Mikkelsen, Lupita Nyong’o, Chris Rock, Kerry Barden, Billy Hopkins, Sean Bobbitt, Masanobu Takayanagi, Philippe Le Sourd, William Chang Suk Ping, David Magdael, Beatrix Aruna Pasztor, Hany Abu-Assad, Jay…

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Academy Invites 271 To Membership

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is extending invitations to join the organization to 271 artists and executives who have distinguished themselves by their contributions to theatrical motion pictures. Those who accept the invitations will be the only additions to the Academy’s membership in 2014. “This year’s class of invitees represents some of…

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REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE PROMOTION OF FILMS ELIGIBLE FOR THE 87th ACADEMY AWARDS

  LOS ANGELES, CA – The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has updated regulations for how companies and individuals may market movies and achievements eligible for the 87th Academy Awards® to Academy members.  The most significant changes affect the Music category. Music Branch members may not contact other…

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Academy’s Very Specific 87th Oscars Rule Changes On Promotion Fall Largely On Music Branch

“Screeners may include closed captioning and simple menus that allow viewers to select different starting points (chapter stops) and audio formats, although the chapter stop headings in the menu may not include captions.” Academy’s Very Specific 87th Oscars Rule Changes On Promotion Fall Largely On Music Branch

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Awards Watch

Quote Unquotesee all »

“What Quibi trying to do is get to the next generation of film narrative. The first generation was movies, and they were principally two-hour stories that were designed to be watched in a single sitting in a movie theater [ED: After formats like the nickelodeon]. The next generation of film narrative was television, principally designed to be watched in one-hour chapters in front of a television set. I believe the third generation of film narrative will be a merging of those two ideas, which is to tell two-hour stories in chapters that are seven to ten minutes in length. We are actually doing long-form in bite-size.”
~ Jeffrey Katzenberg

“The important thing is: what makes the audience interested in it? Of course, I don’t take on any roles that don’t interest me, or where I can’t find anything for myself in it. But I don’t like talking about that. If you go into a restaurant and you have been served an exquisite meal, you don’t need to know how the chef felt, or when he chose the vegetables on the market. I always feel a little like I would pull the rug out from under myself if I were to I speak about the background of my work. My explanations would come into conflict with the reason a movie is made in the first place — for the experience of the audience — and that, I would not want.
~  Christoph Waltz