Awards Watch Archive for January, 2014

Academy Rescinds Original Song Nomination For “Alone Yet Not Alone”

BEVERLY HILLS, CA — On Tuesday night, the Academy’s Board of Governors voted to rescind the Original Song nomination for “Alone Yet Not Alone,” music by Bruce Broughton and lyric by Dennis Spiegel. The decision was prompted by the discovery that Broughton, a former Governor and current Music Branch executive committee member, had emailed members…

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OSCARS® TO CELEBRATE THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF “THE WIZARD OF OZ”

January 28, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEBEVERLY HILLS, CA — The Oscars will honor the 75th anniversary of “The Wizard of Oz,” a best picture nominee in 1939, show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today. “We are delighted to celebrate the birthday of one of the most beloved movies of all time at this…

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20W2O: 10 Best Picture Nominees – Part 2, Call & Response

This column was inspired by some smart people arguing that, somehow, the expansion to as many as 10 Best Picture nominees is a failure and worse, is dragging down the entire Oscar franchise. I disagree.

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20W2O: 10 Best Picture Nominees – Part 1, Why It’s Good

Was there something to complain about here? Did we all want to see Winter’s Bone kicked to the curb? Was Inception not worthy? The Kids Are All Right? If 500,000 more people see Philomena, Dallas Buyer’s Club, Her, or Nebraska because they were Best Picture nominees, viva la system! These are terrific films that are not easy to market. I just don’t see how it’s not a win for everyone.

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Gurus o’ Gold: A Week Since Nominations (2 of 2)

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Gurus o’ Gold: A Week Since Nominations (1 of 2)

One week after nominations, the Gurus go through all the categories (except for shorts) again. And while most of the changes are shifts among the runners up, the big shake-up is at the top of the Best Picture chart, as 12 Years A Slave retakes the top slot and American Hustle falls all the way to…

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PGA Awards Tied Up Over Gravity And 12 Years A Slave

PGA Awards Tied Up Over Gravity And 12 Years A Slave

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Gurus o’ Gold: Nomination Day (Page 1 of 2)

The Gurus (at least 9 of them… for now) are offering up 20 categories (leaving out only the short films, which have not been widely seen by the group), a first-blush look at the frontrunners coming off of nominations morning.

If you were to go by The Gurus guesses today, Gravity would dominate as the leading Oscar winners with 6 wins. But might one of them be Best Picture?

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Gurus o’ Gold: Nomination Day (Page 2 of 2)

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WINNERS OF THE 19th ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE MOVIE AWARDS

Best Picture – “12 Years a Slave” Best Actor – Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club” Best Actress – Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine” Best Supporting Actor – Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club” Best Supporting Actress – Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave” Best Young Actor/Actress – Adele Exarchopoulos, “Blue Is The Warmest Color” Best Acting Ensemble…

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What do you say when you get nominated?

“I am in complete and total shock. I honestly was not expecting this, on a level you can’t even imagine. Again, I’m clearly in shock. I didn’t have a plan for celebrating today because I truly did not expect any of this! But I am going to Critics’ Choice Awards and will be great to…

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20 Weeks To Oscar: Nominations Morning

The Oscar nominations are in and the big surprise is… no real surprise.

Yes, there are people with expectations and disappointments and preferences all over the place. But I think by the end of December, everyone kind of knew what this year looked like… lots of good candidates and not a whole lot of sure bets.

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Complete List Of 86th Academy Award Nominations

Best motion picture of the year “American Hustle” “Captain Phillips” “Dallas Buyers Club” “Gravity” “Her” “Nebraska” “Philomena” “12 Years a Slave” “The Wolf of Wall Street” Performance by an actor in a leading role Christian Bale, “American Hustle” Bruce Dern, “Nebraska” Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Wolf of Wall Street” Chiwetel Ejiofor, “12 Years a Slave” Matthew…

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OSCARS TO CELEBRATE MOVIE HEROES

January 14, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE BEVERLY HILLS, CA — The 86th Academy Awards® will be a celebration of movie heroes, producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today. Offering their first preview of the upcoming Oscar broadcast, hosted by Ellen DeGeneres, the producers said the show will honor big-screen real-life heroes, super heroes, popular…

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Nominations Announced for 2014 Annual Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild Awards Ceremony to Take Place February 15, 2014 at Paramount Studios

  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: LOS ANGELES, Jan. 14, 2014 – Today the Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild’s President Susan Cabral-Ebert announced nominations for the 2014 Annual Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild Awards in 14 Categories. Winners will be announced at the 2014 Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild (IATSE Local 706) Awards honoring make-up artists and hair stylists outstanding achievements in…

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Gurus o’ Gold: Last Stand Before Nominations

The Gurus are back from vacation, just in time to preview the nominations and to shout out about potential surprises – good and bad – on Thursday morning. Moving up the charts are American Hustle, The Wolf of Wall Street, and Dallas Buyers Club. Perhaps in trouble, that Out of Africa duo, Meryl Streep & Robert Redford.

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20W2O: The Morning After Pillory

This is the field of play on which we who cover the awards season now toil. We are a part of The Machine. I am part of The Machine. And The Machine could not care less about legitimacy or honor or respect for the work being celebrated. The Machine just grinds on, growing annually, fed by ambition and dreams and even real passion, until it’s too big to seriously examine, whether you are NBC News or The New York Times or some blogger idiot (or some blogger genius). The Machine abides.

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Critics Top Ten List 2013: Nick Pinkerton, Sundance NOW

1. To the Wonder And Bastards The Canyons The Grandmaster Inside Llewyn Davis Leviathan Like Someone in Love Museum Hours Paradise: Love Prince Avalanche The Wolf of Wall Street

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AMERICAN CINEMA EDITORS (ACE) ANNOUNCES NOMINEES FOR THE 64TH ANNUAL ACE EDDIE AWARDS RECOGNIZING THE BEST EDITING OF THE YEAR IN FILM, TELEVISION AND DOCUMENTARIES

Universal City, CA, Jan. 10 –American Cinema Editors (ACE) today announced nominations for the 64th Annual ACE Eddie Awards recognizing outstanding editing in ten categories of film, television and documentaries. Winners will be revealed during ACE’s annual black-tie awards ceremony on Friday, February 7, 2014 in the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel. BEST EDITED…

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20W2O: “Hey, Mister… I Got Something Shiny For Ya.”

The basic fact is that an October award show intended to honor the best in film of the year is, at best, doomed to be so off the center of the season as to remain meaningless, and at worst, to be an embarrassing farce that actually makes talent accepting awards look desperate and fake.

It’s in “Hollywood’s” interest not to pretend there is any legitimacy to the Hollywood Film Awards at all. Because while it is a red carpet opportunity early in the season, the more we pretend that it means something, the more problematic the whole exercise becomes.

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin