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Awards Watch Archive for June, 2005

Key Dates Announced for 78th Academy Awards®

Beverly Hills, CA — The 78th Annual Academy Awards will be held on Sunday, March 5, 2006, and it will start on the hour — 5 p.m. straight up on the West Coast, 8 p.m. on the East. The traditional red carpet arrivals pre-show that precedes the Oscar telecast will start at 4:30 p.m. on…

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Academy Invites 112 to Membership

Beverly Hills, CA — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has extended membership invitations to 112 artists and executives who have distinguished themselves in the field of theatrical motion pictures. The group will be the only new voting members invited to join the organization in 2005. “Our decision to slow the growth of…

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AMPAS Board Votes Against New Category

Beverly Hills, CA — The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Tuesday night not to grant the request of a consortium of stunt performers’ organizations for an annual Academy Award category in their field. “At a time when the Academy is trying to find ways to reduce the…

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78th Academy Awards® Rules Voted by AMPAS Governors

Beverly Hills, CA — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences continues to clamp down on the numbers of Oscar® statuettes that can be handed out, further tightening restrictions on recipients in the Best Picture category this year and establishing a cap for the first time in the Original Song category. The 78th Annual…

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Awards Watch

Rodd Hibbard on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Bill Morton on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

YancySkancy on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Patryk on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Patryk on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Molly's Dad on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Pete on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Hallick on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Doug Pratt on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

chris on: 51 Weeks To Oscar

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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