Awards Watch Archive for June, 2005

Key Dates Announced for 78th Academy Awards®

Beverly Hills, CA — The 78th Annual Academy Awards will be held on Sunday, March 5, 2006, and it will start on the hour — 5 p.m. straight up on the West Coast, 8 p.m. on the East. The traditional red carpet arrivals pre-show that precedes the Oscar telecast will start at 4:30 p.m. on…

Read the full article »

Academy Invites 112 to Membership

Beverly Hills, CA — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has extended membership invitations to 112 artists and executives who have distinguished themselves in the field of theatrical motion pictures. The group will be the only new voting members invited to join the organization in 2005. “Our decision to slow the growth of…

Read the full article »

AMPAS Board Votes Against New Category

Beverly Hills, CA — The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Tuesday night not to grant the request of a consortium of stunt performers’ organizations for an annual Academy Award category in their field. “At a time when the Academy is trying to find ways to reduce the…

Read the full article »

78th Academy Awards® Rules Voted by AMPAS Governors

Beverly Hills, CA — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences continues to clamp down on the numbers of Oscar® statuettes that can be handed out, further tightening restrictions on recipients in the Best Picture category this year and establishing a cap for the first time in the Original Song category. The 78th Annual…

Read the full article »

Awards Watch

apartment cleaners apartment cleaning apartment cleaning service apartment cleaner apartment cleaning apartment cleaning in apartment cleaning service maid maids maid services maid service in maid services in maid cleaning service maid cleaning services h on: Gurus o' Gold: Thanks, About To Be Given The Last 4 Films

maid provider on: 2012 Top Tens: The First of the Lists

Ben Kabak on: 364 Days To Oscar: Wrapping Up

Daniella Isaacs on: 364 Days To Oscar: Wrapping Up

YancySkancy on: 364 Days To Oscar: Wrapping Up

Stephen Barrow on: Gurus o' Gold: Our Best Guess... Our Final Guess

pat on: 364 Days To Oscar: Wrapping Up

Bob Burns on: 364 Days To Oscar: Wrapping Up

Hallick on: 364 Days To Oscar: Wrapping Up

Hallick on: 364 Days To Oscar: Wrapping Up

Quote Unquotesee all »

Tsangari: With my next film, White Knuckles, it comes with a budget — it’s going to be a huge new world for me. As always when I enter into a new thing, don’t you wonder how it’s going to be and how much of yourself you are going to have to sacrifice? The ballet of all of this. I’m already imaging the choreography — not of the camera, but the choreography of actually bringing it to life. It is as fascinating as the shooting itself. I find the producing as exciting as the directing. The one informs the other. There is this producer-director hat that I constantly wear. I’ve been thinking about these early auteurs, like Howard Hawks and John Ford and Preston Sturges—all of these guys basically were hired by the studio, and I doubt they had final cut, and somehow they had films that now we can say they had their signatures.  There are different ways of being creative within the parameters and limitations of production. The only thing you cannot negotiate is stupidity.
Filmmaker: And unfortunately, there is an abundance of that in the world.
Tsangari: This is the only big risk: stupidity. Everything else is completely worked out in the end.
~ Chevalier‘s Rachel Athina Tsangari

“The middle-range movies that I was doing have largely either stopped being made, or they’ve moved to television, now that television is a go-to medium for directors who can’t get work in theatricals, because there are so few theatricals being made. But also with the new miniseries concept, you can tell a long story in detail without having to cram it all into 90 minutes. You don’t have to cut the characters and take out the secondary people. You can actually put them all on a big canvas. And it is a big canvas, because people have bigger screens now, so there’s no aesthetic difference between the way you shoot a movie and the way you shoot a TV show.

“Which is all for the good. But what’s happened in the interim is that theatrical movies being a spectacle business are now either giant blockbuster movies that run three hours—even superhero movies run three hours, they used to run like 58 minutes!—and the others, which are dysfunctional family independent movies or the slob comedy or the kiddie movie, and those are all low-budget. So the middle ground of movies that were about things, they’re just gone. Or else they’re on HBO. Like the Bryan Cranston LBJ movie, which years ago would’ve been made for theaters.

“You’ve got people like Paul Schrader and Walter Hill who can’t get their movies theatrically distributed because there’s no market for it. So they end up going to VOD, and VOD is a model from which no one makes any money, because most of the time, as soon as they get on the site, they’re pirated. So the whole model of the system right now is completely broken. And whether or not anybody’s going to try to fix, or if it even can be fixed, I don’t know. But it’s certainly not the same business that I got into in the ’70s.”
~ Joe Dante

Z Weekend Report