Awards Watch Archive for January, 2004

Writer’s Guild of America

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY LOST IN TRANSLATION Written by Sofia Coppola BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY AMERICAN SPLENDOR Written by Robert Pulcini & Shari Springer Berman, Based on the Comic Book Series by Harvey Pekar and the Novel by Harvey Pekar and Joyce Brabne TELEVISION WINNERS Animation THE DAD WHO KNEW TOO LITTLE (The Simpsons), Written by Matt…

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Washington, D.C. Area Film Critics Association

And The Winners Are … Best Film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Ensemble Love Actually Best Director Peter Jackson/Lord of the Rings: Return of the King Best Actor Bill Murray/Lost in Translation Best Actress Naomi Watts/21 Grams Best Supporting Actor Benicio del Toro/21 Grams Best Supporting Actress Anna Deveare…

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Vancouver Film Critics

Best Picture Lost in Translation Runners-up The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Mystic River Best Actor Sean Penn – Mystic River Runners-Up Bill Murray – Lost in Translation Ben Kingsley – House of Sand and Fog Best Actress Charlize Theron – Monster Runners-Up Scarlett Johansson – Lost in Translation Jennifer Connelly…

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Toronto Film Critics

Best Picture Lost in Translation Best Director Peter Jackson – The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Actor Bill Murray – Lost in Translation Best Actress Samantha Morton – Morvern Callar Best Supporting Actor Peter Sarsgaard – Shattered Glass Best Supporting Actress Miranda Richardson – Spider Best Screenplay The Barbarian Invasions…

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The Southeastern Film Critics Association

Best Picture The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Director Peter Jackson – The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Actor Bill Murray, Lost In Translation Best Actress Naomi Watts, 21 Grams Best Supporting Actor Tim Robbins, Mystic River Best Supporting Actress Renee Zellweger, Cold Mountain Best…

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The Golden Reel Sound Editors Guild Nominations

Best Sound Editing – Domestic Feature Film The Italian Job Kill Bill, Vol. 1 The Last Samurai Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World The Matrix Reloaded Open Range Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl Seabiscuit Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines Best Sound Editing – Music – Feature…

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San Francisco Film Critics

Best Picture Lost in Translation Best Director Peter Jackson for Lord of the Rings: Return of the King Best Actor Bill Murray for Lost in Translation Best Actress Charlize Theron for Monster Best Supporting Actor Peter Saarsgard for Shattered Glass Best Supporting Actress Patricia Clarkson for Pieces of April Best Foreign Language Film The Son…

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Seattle Film Critics Circle

Best Picture American Splendor. Runners-up: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, Lost in Translation Best Director Sofia Coppola, Lost in Translation. Runner-up: Peter Jackson, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Actor Bill Murray, Lost in Translation. Runner-up: Paul Giamatti, American Splendor Best Actress Hope Davis, American…

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Saturn Awards

Best Science Fiction Film The Hulk (Universal) Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Cradle Of Life (Paramount) The Matrix Revolutions (Warner Bros.) Paycheck (Paramount) Terminator 3: Rise Of The Machines (Warner Bros.) X2: X-Men United (20th Century Fox) Best Fantasy Film Big Fish (Sony) Freaky Friday (Buena Vista) The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen (20th Century Fox) The…

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San Diego Film Critics

Best Picture Dirty Pretty Things Best Director Peter Jackson – The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Actor Chiewetel Ejiofor – Dirty Pretty Things Best Actress Naomi Watts – 21 Grams Best Supporting Actor Djimon Hounsou – In America Best Supporting Actress Renee Zellweger – Cold Mountain Best Foreign Film The…

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Screen Actors Guild

Actor Johnny Depp, Pirates of the Caribbean Actress Charlize Theron, Monster Supporting Actor Tim Robbins, Mystic River Supporting Actress Renee Zellweger, Cold Mountain Ensemble: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King Television awards Actor in a TV movie or miniseries Al Pacino – Angels in America Actress in a TV movie or miniseries…

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Premiere Magazine

Best Picture Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Director Peter Jackson The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Actor Sean Penn Mystic River Best Actress Charlize Theron Monster Best Supporting Actor Tim Robbins Mystic River Best Supporting Actress Renee Zellweger Cold Mountain Best Visual Effects Lord of…

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Phoenix Film Critics

Best Picture Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Best Director Peter Jackson ‘The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King’ Best Actor Ben Kingsley ‘House of Sand and Fog’ Best Actress Naomi Watts ’21 Grams’ Best Supporting Actor Alec Baldwin ‘The Cooler’ Best Supporting Actress Patricia Clarkson ‘Pieces of April’…

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Producer’s Guild

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King New Line Cinema Barrie M. Osborne Peter Jackson Fran Walsh OTHER WINNERS Television Drama: “Six Feet Under,” HBO. Television Comedy: “Sex and the City,” HBO. Reality, game or informational series: “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy,” Bravo. Long-form television: “My House in Umbria,” HBO. 2003…

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People’s Choice Awards

Favorite Motion Picture Pirates of the Caribbean Favorite Motion Picture – Drama Favorite Motion Picture – Comedy The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Bruce Almighty Favorite Actor Favorite Actress Mel Gibson Julia Roberts Other Categories Favorite All-Time Entertainer Favorite Female Performer Tom Hanks Jennifer Aniston Favorite Talk Show Host Favorite Male Performer Oprah…

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Online Film Critics Awards

WINNERS Best Picture Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Producers: Peter Jackson, Barrie M. Osborne & Fran Walsh Best Director Peter Jackson Lord of the Rings: Return of the King Best Actor Bill Murray Lost in Translation Best Actress Naomi Watts 21 Grams Best Supporting Actor Peter Sarsgaard Shattered Glass Best Supporting…

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Central Ohio Film Critics

Best Picture Lost in Translation Runner up: The Lord of the Rings: TheReturn of the King Best Director Peter Jackson, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Rrunner up: Sofia Coppola, Lost in Translation Best Actor Sean Penn, Mystic River Runner up: Bill Murray, Lost in Translation Best Actress Charlize Theron, Monster…

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New York Film Critics Online

FILM AWARDS Picture …… Lost in Translation Director …… Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation) Actor …… Bill Murray (Lost in Translation) Actress …… Charlize Theron (Monster) Support Actor …… Alex Baldwin (The Cooler) Support Actress …… Scarlett Johanson (Lost in Translation) Screenplay …… In America (Jim, Naomi & Kirsten Sheridan) Foreign Language …… Demonlover Documentary…

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New York Film Critics’ Circle

Best Picture Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King New Line Cinemas Best Director Sofia Coppola Lost in Translation Focus Features Best Actor Bill Murray Lost in Translation Focus Features Best Actress Hope Davis American Splendor Fineline Features The Secret Lives of Dentists Manhattan Pictures Int’l Best Supporting Actor Eugene Levy A Mighty…

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National Board of Review

Best Film ….. Mystic River Top Ten Films ….. Mystic River ….. The Last Samurai ….. The Station Agent ….. 21 Grams ….. House of Sand and Fog ….. Lost in Translation ….. Cold Mountain ….. In America ….. Seabiscuit ….. Master and Commander Best Foreign Film ….. Barbarian Invasions Top Five Foreign Films ……..

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Awards Watch

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin