The Top Tens

The Top Tens: January 7, 2011

True Grit continues to climb up the chart, Toy Story 3 is closing the gap with Inception, and The Social Network stands alone.

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The Top Tens: January 3, 2011

While The Social Network stays put, True Grit and The Fighter are slowly working their way up the chart. More lists still to come.

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Top Tens: January 1, 2011

More lists .. and True Grit moves up into the top ten. While most of the rest of the chart remains the same, there are more than 150 titles on the list .. proving that almost every movie has someone out there who loves it.

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Top Tens: December 31, 2010

There were a couple of technical glitches as the new system settles in – but the lists are starting to add up now. Yes, Social Network stays on top, but Inception and The King’s Speech are moving up the charts.

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The Top Tens: December 24, 2010

The lists keep coming in, but the chart remains (almost) the same. Carlos and The Ghost Writer move up a notch, and the top five stay locked in place. The Social Network stays on top by a wide, wide margin.

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The Top Tens: December 22, 2010

No surprises so far – The Social Network still dominates the top of the list with Winter’s Bone a strong second. The King’s Speech and 127 Hours are back into the top ten and Toy Story is moving up slow and steady.

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The Top Tens: December 17, 2010

With almost 50 lists in, The Social Network still sits on top, but Winter’s Bone is gaining ground. Futher down the list, Black Swan dances into third, Toy Story 3 stays steady in fourth, with Carlos nipping at its heels.

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Top Tens: December 13, 2010

The Social Network sits alone at the top of the chart, with Inception, Winter’s Bone and Toy Story 3 battling it out in the next three spots. But it’s still early in the race…

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Critics Top Tens 2010 (as of Dec 9)

The first Top Ten lists of 2010 are coming in. For the next couple of weeks, MCN will be updating daily as we aggregate lists from all parts of the critical community.

With just 6 lists in, Nolan and Fincher are duking it out for the top slot…

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The Top Ten Chart for the Decade Scoreboard

With 13 mentions, together and individually, the Lord of the Rings Trilogy is the top vote getter.

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The Top Ten Chart for January 6, 2010

132 Critics. 161 Films. 30 New to the List.

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The Top Ten Chart for January 2, 2010

102 Critics. 151 Films. 30 New to the List.

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The Top Ten Chart for December 29, 2009

74 Critics . 125 Films. 20 New to the List.

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The Top Ten Chart for January 6, 2009

Top Ten Lists; 265 Films Listed; 106 Films with one vote; Five films appear on more than 100 lists; Iron Man jumps 10 spots into the Top 20. One Vote Wonders

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“There are critics who see their job as to be on the side of the artist, or in a state of imaginative sympathy or alliance with the artist. I think it’s important for a critic to be populist in the sense that we’re on the side of the public. I think one of the reasons is, frankly, capitalism. Whether you’re talking about restaurants or you’re talking about movies, you’re talking about large-scale commercial enterprises that are trying to sell themselves and market themselves and publicize themselves. A critic is, in a way, offering consumer advice. I think it’s very, very important in a time where everything is commercialized, commodified, and branded, where advertising is constantly bleeding into other forms of discourse, for there to be an independent voice kind of speaking to—and to some extent on behalf of—the public.”
~ A. O. Scott On One Role Of The Critic

“Every night, we’d sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that’s a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you’re randomly looking, walking through a bookstore or an airport. I said, “How many people are doing this?” It was about 30 people.”
~ George Miller’s Conversations With Kubrick