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The Top Tens

The Top Ten Lists: And Boyhood Stands Alone

Two Days, One Night and Only Lovers Left Alive move into the Top 20, displacing Interstellar and The Lego Movie. And Boyhood stays alone at the top.

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The Top Ten Lists: The Lists Keep Coming

It’s still early, but Boyhood has a pretty commanding lead so far. The Lego Movie is falling back a little, and Foxcatcher, Ida and Citizenfour have made the top 20. Stay tuned!

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The Critics Top Tens of 2014: The First Lists

With the lists just starting to come in, Boyhood sits alone at the top of the chart.

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The Top Tens of 2013: 155 Lists and Counting

With 231 films on the list, 12 Years a Slave, Inside Llewyn Davis and Gravity continue to hold the top three spots. The Act of Killing has broken into the top five, and Lone Survivor makes its debut on the scoreboard.

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The Top Ten Lists: 2013

With more than 70 lists, there are 146 films on the scorecard. There’s a lot of agreement in the top spots, with Gravity still leading the lists, but a few are climbing the chart. Dallas Buyers Club and Short Term 12 break the top 20.

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The Top Ten Lists of 2013: 60 and Counting

With sixty lists counted, Gravity now sits at the top of the list. American Hustle has moved into the top five, and Leviathan has jumped onto the list at #15.

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The Top Tens of 2013: The Big Scoreboard

The first of the Top Ten lists are in and counted. 12 Years a Slave, Gravity and Inside Llewyn Davis lead the chart by a wide margin. But there are still a lot of lists yet to be tallied.

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The 2012 Top Tens: Updated

Another 30 lists … and the top 10 remain the same. A little bit of a shuffle in the next ten, with Looper and Skyfall moving up the chart. The next update may find The Grey stepping forward to take the #20 spot from The Sessions, but Zero Dark Thirty seems safe at the top.

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Critics Top Tens Update

The first 100 lists and Zero Dark Thirty leads the Top Tens by a significant margin. Further down the list, The Dark Knight Rises and The Sessions move into the Top 20, and The Master makes a leap forward. Still lots more lists to come …

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2012 Top Tens: The First of the Lists

As the first lists roll in, Zero Dark Thirty and Amour lead the chart. With just 21 lists, there are more than 85 movies mentioned so far… seems to be a lot of love to go around.

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Critics Top Ten List 2012: David Edelstein, New York

David Edelstein, New York 1. Zero Dark Thirty 2. Lincoln 3. Amour 4. The Gatekeepers 5. The Deep Blue Sea 6. Life of Pi 7. How to Survive a Plague and Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry 8. Pitch Perfect 9. Oslo, August 31st 10. Friends With Kids

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Critics Top Ten List 2012: Richard Corliss, TIME

Richard Corliss, TIME 1. Amour 2. Beasts of the Southern Wild 3. Life of Pi 4. Anna Karenina 5. The Dark Knight Rises 6. Zero Dark Thirty 7. Dark Horse 8. Dragon 9. Frankenweenie 10. Invisible War

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Critics Top Ten List 2012: John Waters, ARTFORUM

John Waters, ARTFORUM 1  The Deep Blue Sea 2 Paradise: Faith 3 Paradise: Love 4 Amour 5 Killer Joe 6 Beasts of the Southern Wild 7 Compliance 8 Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present 9 Beloved 10 The Imposter  

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The Top Tens of 2011: 210 Lists And Counting

The top 20 stay the top 20, but Drive has moved around The Artist into the third position. The Tree of Life is too far out in front to chase, but overtaking The Descendants may still be possible.

See the individual Top Ten lists here.

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The Top Tens: Updated December 30

164 lists, 220 films, and The Tree of Life continues to sit on the top of the
scoreboard. As new lists come in, The Artist is closing in on the The Descendants and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is making a play for the top ten .. stay tuned.

See the individual Top Ten lists here.

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The Top Tens of 2011: December 27

With over 100 top ten lists in, Tree of Life and The Descendants are firmly at the top of the scoreboard, while Drive makes a play for the number three spot.

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The Top Tens of 2011: December 23

Still a lot of lists to go, but it’s still Clooney and Pitt at the top of the chart, with The Tree of Life edging out The Descendants. The girls aren’t far behind, though – Bridesmaids and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo are quickly catching up.

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2011 Top Tens: The First of the Lists

As the first of the Top Ten Lists start to roll in, George Clooney and Brad Pitt top the leaderboard with The Decendants and The Tree of Life. With Moneyball in the fifth spot, Pitt has two horses in the race. Only 14 lists so far .. a couple of hundred yet to go.

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“Chad Harbach spent ten years writing his novel. It was his avocation, for which he was paid nothing, with no guarantee he’d ever be paid anything, while he supported himself doing freelance work, for which I don’t think he ever made $30,000 a year. I sold his book for an advance that equated to $65,000 a year—before taxes and commission—for each of the years of work he’d put in. The law schools in this country churn out first-year associates at white-shoe firms that pay them $250,000 a year, when they’re twenty-five years of age, to sit at a desk doing meaningless bullshit to grease the wheels of the corporatocracy, and people get upset about an excellent author getting $65,000 a year? Give me a fucking break.”
~ Book Agent Chris Parris-Lamb On The State Of The Publishing Industry

INTERVIEWER
Do you think this anxiety of yours has something to do with being a woman? Do you have to work harder than a male writer, just to create work that isn’t dismissed as being “for women”? Is there a difference between male and female writing?

FERRANTE
I’ll answer with my own story. As a girl—twelve, thirteen years old—I was absolutely certain that a good book had to have a man as its hero, and that depressed me. That phase ended after a couple of years. At fifteen I began to write stories about brave girls who were in serious trouble. But the idea remained—indeed, it grew stronger—that the greatest narrators were men and that one had to learn to narrate like them. I devoured books at that age, and there’s no getting around it, my models were masculine. So even when I wrote stories about girls, I wanted to give the heroine a wealth of experiences, a freedom, a determination that I tried to imitate from the great novels written by men. I didn’t want to write like Madame de La Fayette or Jane Austen or the Brontës—at the time I knew very little about contemporary literature—but like Defoe or Fielding or Flaubert or Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky or even Hugo. While the models offered by women novelists were few and seemed to me for the most part thin, those of male novelists were numerous and almost always dazzling. That phase lasted a long time, until I was in my early twenties, and it left profound effects.
~ Elena Ferrante, Paris Review Art Of Fiction No. 228

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