The Top Tens

The Top Ten Lists: And Boyhood Stands Alone

Two Days, One Night and Only Lovers Left Alive move into the Top 20, displacing Interstellar and The Lego Movie. And Boyhood stays alone at the top.

Read the full article »

The Top Ten Lists: The Lists Keep Coming

It’s still early, but Boyhood has a pretty commanding lead so far. The Lego Movie is falling back a little, and Foxcatcher, Ida and Citizenfour have made the top 20. Stay tuned!

Read the full article »

The Critics Top Tens of 2014: The First Lists

With the lists just starting to come in, Boyhood sits alone at the top of the chart.

Read the full article »

The Top Tens of 2013: 155 Lists and Counting

With 231 films on the list, 12 Years a Slave, Inside Llewyn Davis and Gravity continue to hold the top three spots. The Act of Killing has broken into the top five, and Lone Survivor makes its debut on the scoreboard.

Read the full article »

The Top Ten Lists: 2013

With more than 70 lists, there are 146 films on the scorecard. There’s a lot of agreement in the top spots, with Gravity still leading the lists, but a few are climbing the chart. Dallas Buyers Club and Short Term 12 break the top 20.

Read the full article »

The Top Ten Lists of 2013: 60 and Counting

With sixty lists counted, Gravity now sits at the top of the list. American Hustle has moved into the top five, and Leviathan has jumped onto the list at #15.

Read the full article »

The Top Tens of 2013: The Big Scoreboard

The first of the Top Ten lists are in and counted. 12 Years a Slave, Gravity and Inside Llewyn Davis lead the chart by a wide margin. But there are still a lot of lists yet to be tallied.

Read the full article »

The 2012 Top Tens: Updated

Another 30 lists … and the top 10 remain the same. A little bit of a shuffle in the next ten, with Looper and Skyfall moving up the chart. The next update may find The Grey stepping forward to take the #20 spot from The Sessions, but Zero Dark Thirty seems safe at the top.

Read the full article »

Critics Top Tens Update

The first 100 lists and Zero Dark Thirty leads the Top Tens by a significant margin. Further down the list, The Dark Knight Rises and The Sessions move into the Top 20, and The Master makes a leap forward. Still lots more lists to come …

Read the full article »

2012 Top Tens: The First of the Lists

As the first lists roll in, Zero Dark Thirty and Amour lead the chart. With just 21 lists, there are more than 85 movies mentioned so far… seems to be a lot of love to go around.

Read the full article »

Critics Top Ten List 2012: David Edelstein, New York

David Edelstein, New York 1. Zero Dark Thirty 2. Lincoln 3. Amour 4. The Gatekeepers 5. The Deep Blue Sea 6. Life of Pi 7. How to Survive a Plague and Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry 8. Pitch Perfect 9. Oslo, August 31st 10. Friends With Kids

Read the full article »

Critics Top Ten List 2012: Richard Corliss, TIME

Richard Corliss, TIME 1. Amour 2. Beasts of the Southern Wild 3. Life of Pi 4. Anna Karenina 5. The Dark Knight Rises 6. Zero Dark Thirty 7. Dark Horse 8. Dragon 9. Frankenweenie 10. Invisible War

Read the full article »

Critics Top Ten List 2012: John Waters, ARTFORUM

John Waters, ARTFORUM 1  The Deep Blue Sea 2 Paradise: Faith 3 Paradise: Love 4 Amour 5 Killer Joe 6 Beasts of the Southern Wild 7 Compliance 8 Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present 9 Beloved 10 The Imposter  

Read the full article »

The Top Tens of 2011: 210 Lists And Counting

The top 20 stay the top 20, but Drive has moved around The Artist into the third position. The Tree of Life is too far out in front to chase, but overtaking The Descendants may still be possible.

See the individual Top Ten lists here.

Read the full article »

The Top Tens: Updated December 30

164 lists, 220 films, and The Tree of Life continues to sit on the top of the
scoreboard. As new lists come in, The Artist is closing in on the The Descendants and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is making a play for the top ten .. stay tuned.

See the individual Top Ten lists here.

Read the full article »

The Top Tens of 2011: December 27

With over 100 top ten lists in, Tree of Life and The Descendants are firmly at the top of the scoreboard, while Drive makes a play for the number three spot.

Read the full article »

The Top Tens of 2011: December 23

Still a lot of lists to go, but it’s still Clooney and Pitt at the top of the chart, with The Tree of Life edging out The Descendants. The girls aren’t far behind, though – Bridesmaids and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo are quickly catching up.

Read the full article »

2011 Top Tens: The First of the Lists

As the first of the Top Ten Lists start to roll in, George Clooney and Brad Pitt top the leaderboard with The Decendants and The Tree of Life. With Moneyball in the fifth spot, Pitt has two horses in the race. Only 14 lists so far .. a couple of hundred yet to go.

Read the full article »

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The Motion Picture Academy, at considerable expense and with great efficiency, runs all the nominated pictures at its own theater, showing each picture twice, once in the afternoon, once in the evening. A nominated picture is one in connection with which any kind of work is nominated for an award, not necessarily acting, directing, or writing; it may be a purely technical matter such as set-dressing or sound work. This running of pictures has the object of permitting the voters to look at films which they may happen to have missed or to have partly forgotten. It is an attempt to make them realize that pictures released early in the year, and since overlaid with several thicknesses of battered celluloid, are still in the running and that consideration of only those released a short time before the end of the year is not quite just.

“The effort is largely a waste. The people with votes don’t go to these showings. They send their relatives, friends, or servants. They have had enough of looking at pictures, and the voices of destiny are by no means inaudible in the Hollywood air. They have a brassy tone, but they are more than distinct.”All this is good democracy of a sort. We elect Congressmen and Presidents in much the same way, so why not actors, cameramen, writers, and all rest of the people who have to do with the making of pictures? If we permit noise, ballyhoo, and theater to influence us in the selection of the people who are to run the country, why should we object to the same methods in the selection of meritorious achievements in the film business? If we can huckster a President into the White House, why cannot we huckster the agonized Miss Joan Crawford or the hard and beautiful Miss Olivia de Havilland into possession of one of those golden statuettes which express the motion picture industry’s frantic desire to kiss itself on the back of its neck? The only answer I can think of is that the motion picture is an art. I say this with a very small voice. It is an inconsiderable statement and has a hard time not sounding a little ludicrous. Nevertheless it is a fact, not in the least diminished by the further facts that its ethos is so far pretty low and that its techniques are dominated by some pretty awful people.

“If you think most motion pictures are bad, which they are (including the foreign), find out from some initiate how they are made, and you will be astonished that any of them could be good. Making a fine motion picture is like painting “The Laughing Cavalier” in Macy’s basement, with a floorwalker to mix your colors for you. Of course most motion pictures are bad. Why wouldn’t they be?”
~ Raymond Chandler, “Oscar Night In Hollywood,” 1948

“Film festivals, for those who don’t know, are not exactly the glitzy red carpet affairs you see on TV. Those do happen, but they’re a tiny part of the festival. The main part of any film festival are the thousands of people with festival passes hanging on lanyards beneath their anoraks, carrying brochures for movies you have never and will never hear of, desperately scrabbling to sell whatever movie it is to buyers from all over the world. Every hotel bar, every cafe, every restaurant is filled to the brim with these people, talking loudly about non-existent deals. The Brits are the worst because most of the British film industry, with a few honourable exceptions, are scam artists and chancers who move around from company to company failing to get anything good made and trying to cast Danny Dyer in anything that moves. I’m seeing guys here who I first met twenty years ago and who are still wearing the same clothes, doing the same job (albeit for a different company) and spinning the same line of bullshit about how THIS movie has Al Pacino or Meryl Streep or George Clooney attached and, whilst that last one didn’t work out, THIS ONE is going to be HUGE. As the day goes on, they start drinking and it all gets ugly and, well, that’s why I’m the guy walking through the Tiergarten with a camera taking pictures of frozen lakes and pretending this isn’t happening.

“Berlin is cool, though and I’ve been lucky to be doing meetings with some people who want to actually get things done. We’ll see what comes of it.”
~ Julian Simpson