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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Adrian Martin

Adrian Martin Mysteries of Lisbon (Raúl Ruiz) The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick) We Need to Talk about Kevin (Lynne Ramsay) Road to Nowhere (Monte Hellman) Bridesmaids (Paul Feig) Attenberg (Athina Rachel Tsangari) Drive (Nicolas Winding Refn) Sleeping Beauty (Julia Leigh) Friends with Benefits (Will Gluck) Journals of Musan (Park Jung-bum)

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Ray Pride

Ray Pride Movie City News The Interrupters 1. Margaret 2. Drive 3. Melancholia 4. Take Shelter / Tree of Life 5. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy 6. A Separation 7. Martha Marcy May Marlene 8. Shame 9. Road to Nowhere / Certified Copy 10. Aurora / Tuesday, After Christmas

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Rodrigo Perez

Rodrigo Perez Playlist 1. Shame 2. Rampart 3. Beginners 4. Like Crazy 5. Certified Copy 6. The Skin I Live In 7. A Separation 8. Moneyball 9. Beats Rhymes & Life: The Travels Of A Tribe Called Quest 10. The Ides Of March

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino 1. Midnight In Paris 2. Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes 3. Moneyball 4. The Skin I Live In 5. X-Men: First Class 6. Young Adult 7. Attack The Block 8. Red State 9. Warrior 10. The Artist / Our Idiot Brother 11. The Three Musketeers

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Cinema Scope

Cinema Scope 1. This Is Not a Film 2. The Turin Horse 3. L’Apollonide—Souvenirs de la maison close 4. Dreileben 5. Once Upon a Time in Anatolia 6. The Tree of Life 7. Kill List 8. It’s the Earth Not the Moon 9. Sleeping Sickness 10. The Kid With A Bike

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Mal Vincent

“One of the funniest and most humane comedy-dramas of the year, this is about a young man who is presumably dying of cancer. Sure, the minute you read that sentence, you plan to stay away. You shouldn’t, and a surprising number of you didn’t. “

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Peter Martin

My Top 10 released in the US.

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Stephen Bradley

“There wasn’t a film this year that boasted more style or had a firmer idea how to effectively employ that style than “Drive.”

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Gene Triplett

“You can dress up a turkey in IMAX, 3-D and ear-shattering Surround Sound and throw it up on the biggest screen in town, but if there’s no great story, direction or acting to go with the visual feast, it’s still just a big fat turkey that gobbles loudly. Here are 10 that weren’t turkeys in 2011. ”

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Susan Tavernetti

“Infectiously joyful and charming, this black-and-white love letter to the movies reminds us that cinema is a universal language — no dialogue needed.”

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Tyler Hanley

“Mastermind director Martin Scorsese’s longstanding affection for all things cinema is colorfully showcased in the enchanting “Hugo.” Scorsese paints a rich tapestry in adapting the Brian Selznick novel “The Invention of Hugo Cabret,” presenting a vibrant 1930s Paris with exceptional costuming, set design and cinematography.”

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Peter Canavese

“No studio release this year was more ambitious, emotional or elegant than Terrence Malick’s searching epic about our place in a family, a town, a galaxy, the universe.”

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Keith Cohen

Number One: Hugo

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Carol Hemphill

“This picture begins by shocking. Before the end, it becomes twisted and grotesque; a disturbing vision fully realized by Pedro Almodovar.”

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Kent Tentschert

“One of the most beautiful films of the year. This fictional account of Butch Cassidy’s later life is sad, poignant and emotional.”

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Brandy McDonnell

Brandy McDonnell The Oklahoman 1. The Artist 2. Drive 3. War Horse 4. Buck 5. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo 6. Project Nim 7. Hanna 8. Hugo 9. Shame 10. The Way

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Sara Vizcarrondo

Sara Vizcarrondo Box Office Magazine Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Tabloid Certified Copy Drive No Strings Attached Martha Marcy May Marlene Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes Fright Night Love Exposure Tucker & Dale vs. Evil

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Scott Renshaw

Scott Renshaw Charleston City Paper 1. Certified Copy 2. The Muppets 3. Martha Marcy May Marlene 4. We Need to Talk About Kevin 5. A Separation 6. Like Crazy 7. The Tree of Life 8. Drive 9. The Last Lions 10. Meek’s Cutoff

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Anders Wright

Anders Wright San Diego City Beat The Descendants The Double Hour Drive Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close Of Gods and Men Hugo Into the Abyss Midnight in Paris Project Nim The Tree of Life Warrior

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Critics Top Ten List 2011: Orlando Weekly

Justin Stout, Rob Boylan, William Goss Orlando Weekly 1. The Tree of Life 2. The Descendants 3. Circumstance 4. Hesher 5. Hugo 6. Source Code 7. Being Elmo, Buck 8. Hanna 9. 50/50 10. Take Shelter

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Quote Unquotesee all »

“I was 15 when I first watched Sally Hardesty escape into the back of a pickup truck, covered in blood and cackling like a goddamn witch. All of her friends were dead. She had been kidnapped, tortured and even forced to feed her own blood to her cannibalistic captors’ impossibly shriveled patriarch. Being new to the horror genre, I was sure she was going to die. It had been a few months since I survived a violent sexual assault, where I subsequently ran from my assailant, tripped, fell and fought like hell. I crawled home with bloody knees, makeup-stained cheeks and a new void in both my mind and heart. My sense of safety, my ability to trust others, my willingness to form new relationships and my love of spending time with people I cared about were all taken from me. It wasn’t until I found the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre that something clicked. It was Sally’s strength, and her resilience. It was watching her survive blows to the head from a hammer. It was watching her break free from her bonds and burst through a glass window. It was watching her get back up after she’d been stabbed. It was watching her crawl into the back of a truck, laughing as it drove away from Leatherface. She was the last one to confront the killer, and live. I remember sitting in front of the TV and thinking, There I am. That’s me.”
~ Lauren Milici On “The Final Girl”

“‘Thriller’ enforced its own reality principle; it was there, part of the every commute, a serenade to every errand, a referent to every purchase, a fact of every life. You didn’t have to like it, you only had to acknowledge it. By July 6, 1984, when the Jacksons played the first show of their ‘Victory’ tour, in Kansas City, Missouri, Jacksonism had produced a system of commodification so complete that whatever and whoever was admitted to it instantly became a new commodity. People were no longer comsuming commodities as such things are conventionally understood (records, videos, posters, books, magazines, key rings, earrings necklaces pins buttons wigs voice-altering devices Pepsis t-shirts underwear hats scarves gloves jackets – and why were there no jeans called Bille Jeans?); they were consuming their own gestures of consumption. That is, they were consuming not a Tayloristic Michael Jackson, or any licensed facsimile, but themselves. Riding a Mobius strip of pure capitalism, that was the transubstantiation.”
~ Greil Marcus On Michael Jackson