By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Winners of the Inaugural Critics’ Choice Real TV Awards

“QUEER EYE” LEADS WINNERS OF THE INAUGURAL CRITICS’ CHOICE REAL TV AWARDS

 

Leah Remini Receives First Ever Impact Award

Netflix Tops Networks with Nine Awards 

Show Will Air on VH1 on Sunday, June 9

Los Angeles (June 2, 2019) – The Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) and NPACT, the trade organization serving the producers of nonfiction entertainment content, announced the winners of the inaugural Critics’ Choice Real TV Awards tonight, live from the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills.  Television’s brightest shined at the gala event, which will air on VH1 on Sunday, June 9, and was hosted by comedian Loni Love.  Leah Remini received the first ever Impact Award, recognizing her work on her groundbreaking series Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath.

“Queer Eye” led the winners, taking home four awards for Ensemble Cast in an Unscripted SeriesLifestyle Show: Fashion/BeautyMale Star of The Year for Jonathan Van Ness, and Structured Series.  “The Late Late Show with James Corden” also took home multiple awards, for both Late-Night Talk Show (a tie with “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver”) and Show Host for James Corden.  Corden’s “Carpool Karaoke: The Series” won the Short Form Series category, sending the Brit home with three awards total.  The Relationship Show category also resulted in a tie between “Dating Around” and “Married at First Sight.”

Netflix, which led the networks in nominations, also won the most awards, topping nine categories.  CBS, CBS Television/Syndicated, Lifetime, NBC, and PBS each took home two.

Created to give the thriving, ever-evolving genre critical attention and support, the BTJA- and NPACT-developed awards show was adapted from, and replaced, the NPACT Impact Awards held last year.

Bob Bain and Joey Berlin served as Executive Producers.  Ed Martin serves as President of the BTJA.  John Ford is General Manager of NPACT, where Michelle Van Kempen is Head of Policy & Development.  Tiny Horse was on board as Social Media Producer.  The BFCA and BTJA are represented by Dan Black of Greenberg Traurig.

About BFCA/BTJA

The Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) is a partner organization to the Broadcast Film Critics Association and is made up of TV, Radio and Internet journalists who cover television on a regular basis. The two groups will join to present the 25th Annual Critics’ Choice Awards, honoring the finest achievements in film and scripted television, on January 12, 2020 on The CW Television Network.  For more information, visit:www.CriticsChoice.com.

 

About NPACT

NPACT serves as the voice for the non-fiction creative community, helping producers tackle the challenges they face in an age of media disruption, and offering a forum for producers to address critical business issues. NPACT’s 100+ member companies collectively produce the majority of all non-fiction content for US broadcast, cable television and digital platforms, and NPACT membership encompasses production companies of all sizes, as well as allied services companies. The organization maintains offices in New York, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.  Visitwww.NPACT.org for more information.

 

CONTACTS:

Andy Gelb / Elyse Weissman

SLATE PR (for BFCA/BTJA)

andy@slate-pr.com / elyse@slate-pr.com

310-461-0111

 

Leslie Oren

Babygrande PR (for NPACT)

leslie@babygrandepr.com

310-300-3195

 

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WINNERS OF THE INAUGURAL CRITICS’ CHOICE REAL TV AWARDS

Competition Series

Making It (NBC)

Project Runway (Bravo)

**RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1)

Survivor: David vs. Goliath (CBS)

Top Chef (Bravo)

 

Competition Series: Talent/Variety

America’s Got Talent: The Champions (NBC)

So You Think You Can Dance (Fox)

**The Masked Singer (Fox)

The Voice (NBC)

World of Dance (NBC)

 

Unstructured Series

**Born This Way (A&E)

Deadliest Catch (Discovery)

Intervention (A&E)

Many Sides of Jane (A&E)

RuPaul’s Drag Race: Untucked! (VH1)

 

Structured Series

Lip Sync Battle (Paramount Network)

Magic for Humans (Netflix)

**Queer Eye (Netflix)

Shark Tank (ABC)

Tidying Up with Marie Kondo (Netflix)

Who Do You Think You Are? (TLC)

 

Business Show

Bar Rescue (Paramount Network)

Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours to Hell and Back (Fox)

Selling Sunset (Netflix)

**Shark Tank (ABC)

T-Pain’s School of Business (Fuse)

 

Sports Show

**American Ninja Warrior (NBC)

Losers (Netflix)

Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel (HBO)

Sunderland ’Til I Die (Netflix)

Warriors of Liberty City (Starz)

 

Crime/Justice Show

Betrayed (ID)

**Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes (Netflix)

In Pursuit with John Walsh (ID)

Making a Murderer: Part 2 (Netflix)

The Innocent Man (Netflix)

 

Ongoing Documentary Series

Chef’s Table (Netflix)

**POV (PBS)

The Circus: Inside the Wildest Political Show on Earth (Showtime)

United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell (CNN)

Vice (HBO)

 

Limited Documentary Series

Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes (Netflix)

Our Planet (Netflix)

Punk (Epix)

Shut Up and Dribble (Showtime)

**Surviving R. Kelly (Lifetime)

 

Short Form Series

9 Months with Courteney Cox (Facebook Watch)

Biography Presents: History, Herstory (HISTORY)

**Carpool Karaoke: The Series (Apple TV)

Comeback Kids (The Dodo)

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Between the Scenes (Comedy Central)

 

Live Show

BUILD (AOL)

La Voz (Telemundo)

So You Think You Can Dance (Fox)

**The Voice (NBC)

Yellowstone Live (National Geographic)

 

Interactive Show

Talking Dead (AMC)

**Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen (Bravo)

You vs. Wild (Netflix)

 

Talk Show

Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee (Netflix)

**My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman (Netflix)

Red Table Talk (Facebook Watch)

The Ellen DeGeneres Show (Warner Bros. Television/Syndicated)

The View (ABC)

 

Late-Night Talk Show (TIE) 

Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (TBS)

**Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah (Comedy Central)

**The Late Late Show with James Corden (CBS)

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (CBS)

 

Entertainment News Show

Access (NBCUniversal Television/Syndicated)

E! News (E!)

**Entertainment Tonight (CBS Television/Syndicated)

Extra (Warner Bros. Television/Syndicated)

Inside Edition (CBS Television/Syndicated)

 

Culinary Show

Chopped (Food Network)

Nailed It! (Netflix)

Salt Fat Acid Heat (Netflix)

**The Great British Baking Show (PBS)

Top Chef (Bravo)

 

Game Show

Cash Cab (Discovery)

Common Knowledge (Game Show Network)

Ellen’s Game of Games (NBC)

Hollywood Game Night (NBC)

**Jeopardy! (CBS Television/Syndicated)

 

Travel/Adventure Show

Expedition Unknown (Discovery)

Larry Charles’ Dangerous World of Comedy (Netflix)

Somebody Feed Phil (Netflix)

**The Great Food Truck Race (Food Network)

The Voyager with Josh Garcia (NBC)

 

Animal/Nature Show

Amanda to the Rescue (Animal Planet)

Dodo Heroes (Animal Planet)

Dynasties (BBC America)

Hostile Planet (National Geographic)

**Our Planet (Netflix)

 

Lifestyle Show: Fashion/Beauty

Project Runway (Bravo)

Project Runway All-Stars (Lifetime)

**Queer Eye (Netflix)

Say Yes to the Dress (TLC)

 

Relationship Show (TIE)

Born This Way (A&E)

**Dating Around (Netflix)

**Married at First Sight (Lifetime)

The Bachelor (ABC)

Wife Swap (Paramount Network)

 

Lifestyle Show: Home/Garden

Home Town (HGTV)

Love It or List It (HGTV)

**Property Brothers (HGTV)

Tidying Up with Marie Kondo (Netflix)

Trading Spaces (TLC)

Ensemble Cast in an Unscripted Series

Crikey! It’s The Irwins (Animal Planet)

**Queer Eye (Netflix)

RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1)

The Real Housewives of New York City (Bravo)

Trading Spaces (TLC)

 

Show Host

RuPaul Charles – RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1)

Stephen Colbert – The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (CBS)

**James Corden – The Late Late Show with James Corden (CBS)

Busy Philipps – Busy Tonight (E!)

Jerry Seinfeld – Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee (Netflix)

 

Female Star of The Year

Nicole Byer – Nailed It! (Netflix)

Marie Kondo – Tidying Up With Marie Kondo (Netflix)

**Sandra Lee – Dr. Pimple Popper (TLC)

Samin Nosrat – Salt Fat Acid Heat (Netflix)

Chrissy Teigen – Lip Sync Battle (Paramount Network)

Michelle Visage – RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1)

 

Male Star of The Year

David Attenborough – Our Planet (Netflix)

RuPaul Charles – RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1)

Hasan Minhaj – Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj (Netflix)

Phil Rosenthal – Somebody Feed Phil (Netflix)

**Jonathan Van Ness – Queer Eye (Netflix)

 

Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction by a Network or Streaming Platform

A&E

Bravo

FOX

Investigation Discovery (ID)

NBC

**Netflix

 

Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Production

A. Smith & Co. Productions

Big Fish Entertainment

Endemol Shine North America

**Kreativ Inc.

The Intellectual Property Corporation (IPC)

 

 

WINNERS BY PROGRAM FOR THE INAUGRUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE REAL TV AWARDS

American Ninja Warrior (NBC) – 1
Sports Show

 

Born This Way (A&E) – 1

Unstructured Series

 

Carpool Karaoke: The Series (Apple TV) – 1

Short Form Series

 

Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes (Netflix) – 1

Crime – Justice Show

 

Dating Around (Netflix) – 1

Relationship Show (TIE)

 

Dr. Pimple Popper (TLC) – 1

Female Star of The Year – Sandra Lee

 

Entertainment Tonight (CBS Television – Syndicated) – 1

Entertainment News Show

 

Jeopardy! (CBS Television – Syndicated) – 1

Game Show

 

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) – 1

Late-Night Talk Show (TIE)

 

Married at First Sight (Lifetime) – 1

Relationship Show (TIE)

 

My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman (Netflix) – 1

Talk Show

 

Our Planet (Netflix) – 1

Animal/Nature Show

 

POV (PBS) – 1

Ongoing Documentary Series

 

Property Brothers (HGTV) – 1

Lifestyle Show: Home/Garden

 

Queer Eye (Netflix) – 4

Ensemble Cast in an Unscripted Series

Lifestyle Show: Fashion/Beauty

Male Star of The Year – Jonathan Van Ness

Structured Series

 

RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1) – 1

Competition Series

 

Shark Tank (ABC) – 1

Business Show

 

Surviving R. Kelly (Lifetime) – 1

Limited Documentary Series

 

The Great British Baking Show (PBS) – 1

Culinary Show

 

The Great Food Truck Race (Food Network) – 1

Travel/Adventure Show

 

The Late Late Show with James Corden (CBS) – 2

Late-Night Talk Show (TIE)

Show Host – James Corden

 

The Masked Singer (Fox) – 1

Competition Series: Talent/Variety

 

The Voice (NBC) – 1

Live Show

 

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen (Bravo) – 1

Interactive Show

 

WINNERS BY NETWORK FOR THE INAUGURAL CRITICS’ CHOICE REAL TV AWARDS

 

Netflix – 9

CBS – 2

CBS Television/Syndicated – 2

Lifetime – 2

NBC – 2

PBS – 2

A&E – 1

ABC – 1

Apple TV – 1

Bravo – 1

Food Network – 1

Fox – 1

HBO – 1

HGTV – 1

Kreativ Inc. – 1

TLC – 1

VH1 – 1

 

 

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin