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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Oscars-Netflix: Paul Schrader

Via Facebook: “THE NETFLIX DEBATE. I have no animus against Netflix. Ted Sarandos is as smart about film as any studio exec I’ve ever met. Distribution models evolve. The notion of squeezing 200+ people into a dark unventilated space to see a flickering image was created by exhibition economics not any notion of the “theatrical experience.” Netflix allows many financially marginal films to have a platform and that’s a good thing. But here’s my query: it involves FIRST REFORMED. First Reformed was sold at a bargain price to A24 out of the Toronto FF. Netflix, which could have snapped it up as easily as it swats a fly on its ass, passed. As did Amazon. As did Sony Classics and Focus. But A24 saw a commercial path for this austere aesthetic film. As a result First Reformed found a life. A24 rolled it out through festivals and screenings from 2017 to 2018. And it survived. Not a big money maker but profitable for A24 and a jewel in their crown. Would First Reformed have found this public acceptance if Netflix and scooped it up (at say twice the price A24 payed) and dumped it into its larder? Perhaps Bird Box and Kissing Booth can fight their way through the vast sea of Netflix product to find popular acceptance, but First Reformed? Unlikely. Relegated to film esoterica. A different path? My proposal: For club cinemas (Alamo Draft House, Metrograph, Burns Center, Film Forum) to form an alliance with a two tiered streaming system (first tier: Criterion/Mubi, second tier: Netflix/Amazon).Distribution models are in flux. It’s not as simple as theatrical versus streaming.”

2 Responses to “Oscars-Netflix: Paul Schrader”

  1. Bob Burns says:

    Film is going where book publishing has gone. I remember when a new book by an important writer was a cultural event. Now, there is so much good content, books and film have become like litter. Thousands and thousands of young people graduate from film schools every year knowing how to make movies, and the means of making them can be found nearly everywhere. Thousands and thousands know how to promote movies, too.

    We have a local authors event at our big central library every year. Dozens and dozens of authors show up with their self-published books. The library doesn’t even include their books in the local collection, that would be a huge success for a local author, to be included in the permanent collection of a local library. Seems to me that film is very close to a similar reality.

    That’s harsh, but as an architect, I can tell you that the architecture schools pump out tens of thousands of very talented young people every year, too. Talented filmmakers, like talented architects, are a dime a dozen these days. Being sucked into the Netfix maw would be beyond the wildest dreams of the vast majority of most.

  2. Sarag says:

    Gee bob who gives a sh-t about your prognostications on movies. One by the way everyone has thought before and offers nothing.

    Now Paul Schraeder on the other hand has a great idea.

    He’s wrong though on the theater experience.Exhibition Economics may have been the reason but it had the unintended consequence of becoming an experience and we gained something beautiful and ephemeral.

Movie City Indie

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“With any character, the way I think about it is, you have the role on the page, you have the vision of the director and you have your life experience… I thought it was one of the foundations of the role for John Wick. I love his grief. For the character and in life, it’s about the love of the person you’re grieving for, and any time you can keep company with that fire, it is warm. I absolutely relate to that, and I don’t think you ever work through it. Grief and loss, those are things that don’t ever go away. They stay with you.”
~ Keanu Reeves

“I was checking through stuff the other day for technical reasons. I came across The Duellists on Netflix and I was absolutely stunned to see that it was exquisitely graded. So, while I rarely look up my old stuff, I stopped to give it ten minutes. Bugger me, I was there for two hours. I was really fucking pleased with what it was and how the engine still worked within the equation and that engine was the insanity and stupidity of war. War between two men, in that case, who fight on thought they both eventually can’t remember the reason why. It was great, yeah. The great thing about these platforms now is that, one way or another, they’ll seek out and then put out the best possible form and the long form. Frequently, films get cut down because of that curse in which the studio felt or feels that they have to preview. And there’s nothing worse than a preview to diminish the original intent.Oh, yeah, how about every fucking time? And I’ve stewed about films later even more because when you tell the same joke 20 times the joke’s no longer funny. When you tell a bad joke once or twice? It’s fine. But come on, now. Here’s the key on the way I feel when I approach the movie: I try to keep myself as withdrawn from the project as possible once I’ve filmed it. And – this is all key on this – then getting a really excellent editor so I never have to sit in on editing. What happens if you sit in is you become stale and every passage or joke, metaphorically speaking, gets more and more tired. You start cutting it all back because of fatigue. So what you have to do is keep your distance and therefore, in a funny kind of way, you, as the director, should be the preview and that’s it.”
~ Sir Ridley Scott