By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

IFP Announces Jeffrey Sharp New Executive Director To Lead the Organization

[pr]  – The Independent Filmmaker Project (IFP) has announced Jeffrey Sharp as the new Executive Director.  Sharp will lead the institution, which is the nation’s premier member organization of independent storytellers.  An award-winning international film and TV producer and publishing entrepreneur, Sharp brings decades of experience to IFP, including his work producing films such as Boys Don’t CryYou Can Count on MeEvening and The Yellow Birds and digitally publishing authors such as William Styron, Pat Conroy and Pearl Buck as co-founder and President of Open Road Integrated Media.

IFP Co-Chairs Anthony Bregman and Jim Janowitz said, “We are delighted to have Jeff join IFP as its leader.  His credentials and background are a perfect fit with our organization.  He has developed and produced prestigious independent films.  He has extensive non-profit experience as a co-founder and Chair of the Hamptons International Film Festival Advisory Board.  He has experience in related fields such as publishing and digital innovation.  He has built successful companies. He has broad contacts across foundations, arts organizations, and government.  He has a stellar reputation among his peers.  Among a strong group of candidates, Jeff stood out, and we are excited to bring Jeff on board to lead IFP into its 40th year and beyond.”

“I am tremendously honored to join the IFP as its new Executive Director,” said Sharp.  “IFP has had an enormous impact on the independent film industry in New York and around the world for the past forty years.  I am excited to begin working with the talented IFP team, IFP members and alumni as we continue to explore new opportunities and expand on Joana Vicente’s remarkable legacy.”

The Independent Filmmaker Project (IFP) champions the future of storytelling by connecting artists with essential resources at all stages of development and distribution. The organization fosters a vibrant and sustainable independent storytelling community through its year-round programs, which include Independent Film Week, Filmmaker Magazine, the IFP Gotham Awards and the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, a tech and media incubator space developed with the New York Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment.

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