By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film

December 8, 2018

PHILADELPHIA FILM CRITICS CIRCLE NAMES ROMA THE BEST FILM OF 2018 

Philadelphia, PA- The Philadelphia Film Critics Circle today voted on its second annual year-end awards, and the choice for Best Movie was Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma. 

Roma also won awards for Best Cinematography and Best Foreign Film. Tying Roma for the most awards, with three, was If Beale Street Could Talk. From that film, Barry Jenkins won the award for Best Director, Regina King for Best Supporting Actress, and Kiki Layne for Best Breakthrough Performance. 

After four rounds of balloting, when no other category required more than two, Viola Davis won the Best Actress award for Widows. In addition, Christian Bale won Best Actor for Vice.

Richard E. Grant won Best Supporting Actor for Can You Ever Forgive MeThe Incredibles 2 was the winner of Best Animated Film, and Won’t You Be My Neighbor was the choice for Best Documentary. Suspiria was the winner for Best Soundtrack/Score, Boots Riley was awarded Best Directorial Debut for Sorry to Bother You,while the late Audrey Wells won Best Script for The Hate U Give. 

For its two special awards, the Steve Friedman Award- for a person or film that drives major public discourse on a topic or issue, went to Black Panther. And the Elaine May award, for a deserving person or film that brings awareness to women’s issues, went to RBG. 

“It was an eclectic year for films of all types, and they that showed through in our results. I couldn’t be happier,” said Rich Heimlich, cofounder of the critics circle. 

This was the second year of awards since the Circle’s inception in 2017; Get Out was the 2017 winner for Best Movie. 

Full list of winners: 

Best Movie: Roma

Best Director: Barry Jenkins, If Beale Street Could Talk 

Best Actor: Christian Bale, Vice

Best Actress: Viola Davis, Widows 

Best Supporting Actor: Richard E. Grant, Can You Ever Forgive Me

Best Supporting Actress: Regina King, If Beale Street Could Talk 

Best Foreign Film: Roma (Mexico) 

Best Animated Film: The Incredibles 2

Best Documentary: Won’t You Be My Neighbor 

Best Cinematography: Roma (Alfonso Cuaron) 

Best Breakthrough Performance: Kiki Layne, If Beale Street Could Talk 

Best Directorial Debut: Boots Riley, Sorry To Bother You 

Best Script: Audrey Wells, The Hate U Give 

Best Score/Soundtrack: Suspiria (Thom Yorke) 

Elaine May Award: RBG 

Steve Friedman Award: Black Panther. 

One Response to “Philadelphia Film Critics Circle Nod Roma as Best Film, Cinematography and Foreign Film”

  1. I’m super glad Roma won. It 100% deserved it.

    The Incredibles 2, on the other hand…

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