MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Friday Estimates: Blob Beats Rock

friday estimates 071618

7 Responses to “Friday Estimates: Blob Beats Rock”

  1. movieman says:

    Wow. Look at that opening day figure for “Eighth Grade.”
    It could have one of the best PSA’s for a limited release so far this year.
    Another feather in A24’s cap.
    Wonder if “EG” has any chance of crossing over to mainstream success.

  2. Aaron Aradillas says:

    So, is SICARIO 2 going to make less than the original at the domestic box office? I guess they should have tried a little harder to work Emily Blunt into the movie. Also, maybe not every “surprise” hit deserves a sequel.

  3. palmtree says:

    Hot Blog gets a reprieve! Thanks!

    And also thanks for removing the ridiculous per-theater average stat.

    Skyscraper’s biggest challenge was that it wasn’t a sequel or part of a franchise. If Bruce Willis was in it, maybe you could make the argument it was part of some Die Hard alternate universe, but here it’s just an original knock-off. That’s too bad. We’re only rewarding more sequels and franchises which we claim we don’t want, but really kinda do.

    I can’t wait to see Eighth Grade. Along with Sorry to Bother You, Blindspotting, and Three Identical Strangers, I haven’t been this excited about movies in a long time.

  4. dinovelvet says:

    The first Sicario made $46 mil so it looks like this one is going to match it almost exactly

  5. Big G says:

    It’s been fascinating watching Black Panther’s box office. At the end of the weekend of May 11-13 it was at $696.5 million and it’s taken it two months to make it to $699.9 million. Why won’t Disney just put it back in about 200 first run theaters with their higher ticket prices for one weekend to get it over $700 million and get it over with?

  6. BO Sock Puppet says:

    Who needs $700m? Black Panther is already like an overachieving savant forever skewing the curve of all the franchises. Few movies going forward will be able to take advantage of the zeitgeist like BP managed in its rarefied moment, and seeking to force lightning into a different bottle will only result in failure. All downhill from here for the MCU, Star Wars, and moviemaking in general on that scale.

  7. Glamourboy says:

    Ant Man is listed as #3 even though the following 2 movies made more money?

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“I have a license to carry in New York. Can you believe that? Nobody knows that, [Applause] somebody attacks, somebody attacks me, oh, they’re gonna be shot. Can you imagine? Somebody says, oh, it is Trump, he’s easy pickings what do you say? Right? Oh, boy. What was the famous movie? No. Remember, no remember where he went around and he sort of after his wife was hurt so badly and kill. What?  I — Honestly, Yeah, right, it’s true, but you have many of them. Famous movie. Somebody. You have many of them. Charles Bronson right the late great Charles Bronson name of the movie come on.  , remember that? Ah, we’re gonna cut you up, sir, we’re gonna cut you up, uh-huh.

Bing!

One of the great movies. Charles Bronson, great, Charles Bronson. Great movies. Today you can’t make that movie because it’s not politically correct, right? It’s not politically correct. But could you imagine with Trump? Somebody says, oh, all these big monsters aren’t around he’s easy pickings and then shoot.”
~ Donald Trump

“The scene opens the new movie. It was something Ridley Scott told me a long time ago, when I was on my eighth draft of Blade Runner. He thinks it’s my fault, which it probably is, but it’s also his fault, because he kept coming up with new ideas. This time, he said to me, “What did Deckard do before he was doing this?” I said, “He was doing what he was doing, but not on such a high level. He was retiring androids that weren’t quite like Nexus Sixes, like Nexus Fives, kind of dumb androids.” He said, “So, why don’t we start the movie like that?” He always had a new beginning he wanted to try. Let’s start it on a train, let’s start it on a plane. Let’s start in the snow. Let’s start in the desert. I was writing all that. He said, “What if Deckard is retiring an old version of Nexus?” Right away I was feeling him, like fate, and he said, “There’s a cabin, with soup bubbling on the stove …” When he said soup boiling on the stove, I said, “Don’t say any more! Let me get home.” I wrote a scene that night. Just three or four pages. Deckard retires this not-very-bright droid, and you feel sorry for him. It’s like Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men. It’s just those two guys, with Deckard as the George character and the droid as the Lennie, and Deckard doesn’t want to do it. But then the droid gets mad, and then Deckard has to do it. The audience thinks he killed someone—he reaches into the guy’s mouth and pulls off his whole jaw and we see it says made by tyrell industries or whatever. I wrote that scene and took it to Ridley. I was proud of it. I remember standing and watching him read the whole thing. He loved it, but no. There are a lot of scenes that didn’t get in, but I never forgot that one. I wrote it as the beginning to this new short story called “The Shape of the Final Dog.” I’d always wanted to have a dog that wasn’t real, so I wrote one into the scene at the cabin. After Deckard retires the droid, he’s getting ready to take off and he wants the dog to come with him. The dog rolls over and keeps barking with his mouth closed. The dog’s an android dog. I thought, If there’s ever a new Blade Runner, we’ll have to use this scene. Three weeks go by, and I’m working on the story and it’s ready to hand in. The phone rings. Someone with a posh English accent says, “Would you be available in ten minutes for a call with Ridley Scott?” These people are so important they don’t waste their time on voicemail. I said, “I’ll be here.” Ten minutes go by and Ridley calls. “Hampton! Did you know, I think we’ve got it together to do Blade Runner a second time?” I said, “You finally got so hard up you’re calling me.” I knew they’d been looking for a year. People had been telling me, “You’ve got to call Ridley,” but I was a little chagrined or embarrassed. I thought, He’ll call me if he wants. Ridley said, “We’re interested in whether you have any ideas.” I said, “Funny you should ask that question. Let me read you a paragraph.” I walk over there with the phone and I read him the opening paragraph. And he says, “Fuck me. Can you come to London tomorrow?”
~ Hampton Fancher