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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Friday Estimates

fridsay est 063018

Sicario grossed $47 million domestic, $38 million international. This start for Sicario: Day of the Soldado suggests that its sequel will be over $100 million worldwide, so… a win.

Uncle Drew is a cheap movie and will be over $15m this weekend. It is not the launch Lionsgate was hoping for with its very aggressive marketing and promotional effort. But the hope is that it will be the silly, feel-good film that takes off. Either way, it will be a profitable effort… even though it is unlikely to do as much as it did in the US this weekend in the entire rest of the international market.

Leave No Trace and Three Identical Strangers are doing excellent per-screen business on 9 and 6 screens.

4 Responses to “Friday Estimates”

  1. Joe Leydon says:

    Very surprised to see Woman Walks Ahead has gone down the mostly VOD route (with only pro forma theatrical release). In Houston, it’s playing at just one theater, for only two daytime showings per day. Some of the recent Nicolas Cage B-movies have fared better than that. I doubt even the people who gave it mixed reviews at Toronto last fall would have seen this coming.

  2. EtGuild2 says:

    Lionsgate has seemingly been transported back to the aughts this year. Last year it had three $25 million openers at this point, this year, zero, and its two highest are Tyler Perry and Uncle Drew, which are standard Lionsgate releases circa 2007.

  3. Chucky says:

    Lionsgate is handling the Sicario sequel, only not in North America or Spanish-speaking countries. Smart move as that film promotes The Global War On Drugs® to coincide with a national election in Mexico.

  4. cadavra says:

    Finally caught HOTEL ARTEMIS on its way out the door. TBH, ordinarily I wouldn’t have bothered, but with a cast like that I figured it had to have something on the ball. But I didn’t expect something as daring, original and very, very stylish as this. Jodie Foster (aged up to around 70) gives her best performance since hell knows when, and the rest of the cast is right behind her, including Sofia Boutella in another of her patented sleek-assassin roles and Jeff Goldblum as a cool-cuke mob boss. I hope more people will take it for a spin when it hits streaming and DVD.

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