By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Academy Announces 2018 Film Scholars Grants

THE ACADEMY ANNOUNCES 2018 FILM SCHOLARS 
GRANT RECIPIENTS

LOS ANGELES, CA – Glenn Frankel and Keri Walsh have been named 2018 Academy Film Scholars by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Their respective book projects explore the historical context and creative influence of the revolutionary film for its time, Midnight Cowboy, and examine female Method actors and how their feminist contributions earned them a place in the history of film. The Academy’s Educational Grants Committee will award both Frankel and Walsh the scholars’ $25,000 grant awards on the basis of their proposals.

“I am thrilled to support Frankel and Walsh in their research so that they may share their expertise for these timely topics that are not only significant to the film industry, but to society as whole,” said Academy Grants Committee Chair Buffy Shutt. “Their works illuminate the importance of diversity and inclusion in the history of film, something that is essential to remember as we look to further the Academy’s mission. We all look forward to seeing the outcome of their research.”

Frankel’s book will focus on the Oscar-winning best picture, Midnight Cowboy, analyzing how the artists behind the film contributed to this boundary breaking film that signified a shift in representation of sexuality in the 1960’s. As Frankel’s third book researching the implications of cowboy films in American history, it explores not only the historical implications of the film, but also the creative elements that led to its success and a milestone in Hollywood’s acceptance of diverse and controversial subject matters.

Walsh is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at Fordham University. Her project will be among the first scholarly works to explore what is critical and feminist about Method acting in Hollywood films. Primarily focused on Method performances by women from the late 1940s to the early 1960s, she illuminates their neglected and concealed work, and ultimately showcases how it broadened women’s possibilities of acting.

Frankel and Walsh join 14 Academy film scholars who are currently working on projects and 17 other scholars whose works have already been published. Academy film scholars with projects in progress are Dr. Ellen Scott, Dr. Donna Kornhaber, Charles Musser, Emily Thompson, Stuart Liebman, John Belton, Harlow Robinson, Cari Beauchamp, Patrick Keating, Dan Streible, Thomas Schatz, Laurence Kardish, James Tweedie and Ross Melnick.

Established in 1999, the Academy Film Scholars program is designed to support significant new works of film scholarship. The Academy’s cultural and educational wing – the Academy Foundation – annually awards grants to film scholars, cultural organizations and film festivals throughout the U.S. and abroad. Through the Foundation, the Academy also presents a rich assortment of screenings and other public programs each year.

For grant guidelines and information about the Academy Film Scholars program, contact Grants Manager Shawn Guthrie at sguthrie@oscars.org, or visit www.oscars.org/filmscholars.

 

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ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 8,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which is under construction in Los Angeles.

 

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
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4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

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~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch