By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS ACQUIRES NADINE LABAKI’S CAPERNAUM

Acquisition Comes In Advance Of The Film’s Cannes Premiere

CANNES, FRANCE (May 10, 2018) – Sony Pictures Classics announced today that they have acquired North American and Latin American rights to Nadine Labaki’s CAPERNAUM. The film is set to premiere next Thursday at Cannes, where it screens in competition. CAPERNAUM marks a return to Cannes for the Lebanese filmmaker, whose two previous films, CARAMEL and WHERE DO WE GO NOW? (winner of the Audience Award at the Toronto Film Festival) premiered at the festival, and reunites Labaki with Sony Pictures Classics, which distributed WHERE DO WE GO NOW?.

CAPERNAUM was produced by Khaled Mouzana. CAA Media Finance brokered the distribution deal on behalf of the filmmakers with Wild Bunch, who represent the international rights.

Written by Labaki (WHERE DO WE GO NOW?), who also appears in the film, CARPENAUM tells the story of a child who rebels against the life imposed on him and launches a lawsuit against his parents.

“It is wonderful to have the opportunity to collaborate once again with Sony Pictures Classics. CAPERNAUM is very special to me, and with the passion Tom and Michael have for this film, I know this is the ideal partnership,” said Labaki.

Said Sony Pictures Classics, “Nadine Labaki is one of the world’s great filmmakers.  CAPERNAUM is  an emotionally profound experience about the world we live in and promises to be a triumph in Cannes. Nadine Labaki’s moment as writer-director is here and now. It is thrilling to be working with her, as well as her producer Khaled Mouzanar, Vincent Maraval and Eva Diederix at Wild Bunch, and Roeg Sutherland and CAA.”

Sony Pictures Classics plans to open the film in December qualifying the movie for year-end awards consideration.

ABOUT SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Michael Barker and Tom Bernard serve as co-presidents of Sony Pictures Classics—an autonomous division of Sony Pictures Entertainment they founded with Marcie Bloom in January 1992, which distributes, produces, and acquires independent films from around the world.  Barker and Bernard have released prestigious films that have won 39 Academy Awards® (35 of those at Sony Pictures Classics) and have garnered 169 Academy Award® nominations (143 at Sony Pictures Classics) including Best Picture nominations for CALL ME BY YOUR NAME, WHIPLASH, AMOUR, MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, AN EDUCATION, CAPOTE, HOWARDS END, AND CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON.

ABOUT SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, a subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sony Corporation. SPE’s global operations encompass motion picture production and distribution; television production and distribution; home entertainment acquisition and distribution; a global channel network; digital content creation and distribution; operation of studio facilities; development of new entertainment products, services and technologies; and distribution of entertainment in more than 142 countries.

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