By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

NEON NABS NORTH AMERICAN RIGHTS TO ALI ABBASI’S “BORDER” FOLLOWING WORLD PREMIERE IN CANNES

CANNES (May 11, 2018) – Immediately following the world premiere, NEON acquired the North American rights to Border, a troll love story directed by Ali Abbasi (Shelley) and based on a novel by the writer of Let the Right One In. The Swedish genre film made its World Premiere yesterday at the Cannes Film Festival in Un Certain Regard.  Films Boutique is handling worldwide sales.

Border is the second feature from Iranian-born Danish director Abbasi. He co-scripted the film with Isabella Eklöf, in collaboration with novelist John Ajvide Lindqvist (Let the Right One In). The film tells the story of a border guard (Eva Melander) who has the ability to smell human emotions and catch smugglers. When she comes across a mysterious man with a smell that confounds her detection, she is forced to confront hugely disturbing insights about herself and humankind.

Border is produced by Nina Bisgaard, Piodor Gustafsson and Petra Jönsson for Meta Film Stockholm, Spark Film & TV and Kärnfilm, in co-production with Meta Film Denmark, together with Film i Väst, SVT and Copenhagen Film Fund. The Swedish Film Institute and Nordisk Film & TV Fond provided production support. The film was also supported by the Danish Film Institute, MEDIA and Eurimages.

ABOUT NEON:
Founded by Tom Quinn (CEO) and Co-Founder Tim League, NEON’S debut film was Nacho Vigalondo’s Colossal, starring Anne Hathaway and Jason Sudeikis released April 7th, 2016.  NEON was an active buyer at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, acquiring Reinaldo Marcus Green’s Monsters & Men, winner of the Sundance Dramatic Special Jury Award for Outstanding First Feature; Sam Levinson’s Assassination Nation; and Tim Wardle’s Three Identical Strangers, winner of the Sundance Special Jury Award for Storytelling.  In its record breaking inaugural year, NEON released the runaway hit ($30M), 3 Golden Globe and Academy Award nominee and eventual winner I, Tonya by director Craig Gillespie, starring Margot Robbie and Golden Globe  / Oscar Winner for Best Supporting, Actress Allison Janney; Eliza Hittman’s Sundance Award Winner Beach Rats, Matt Spicer’s Sundance and Spirit Award Winner Ingrid Goes West; Laura Poitras’s Risk, Ana Lily Amirpour’s Venice Award Winner The Bad Batch and Errol Morris’, The B-Side.  Other upcoming NEON releases include Aaron Katz’s Gemini (Opening 3/30); Harmony Korine’s The Beach Bum and the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival Opening Night film by Janus Metz, Borg Vs McEnroe (Opening 4/13); and Coralie Fargeat’s groundbreaking feature film debut Revenge (Opening 5/11).  NEON also recently announced a partnership with 30WEST as the sole majority investor in the film studio.

Films Boutique

Films Boutique, a Berlin-based sales company, has been thriving with critically acclaimed, director-driven movies in the last years, notably Ildiko Enyedi’s ON BODY & SOUL (Golden Bear 2017 and Oscar nominated), Houda Benyamina’s “Divines”, which won the Camera d’Or in Cannes; Lav Diaz’s “The Woman Who Left”, Golden Lion in Venice, Ciro Gerra’s “Embrace of the Serpent”, Directors’ Fortnight winner and Oscar nom for Best Foreign Language Film.

The company unveiled 6 films in Cannes official selections this year, notably Cristina Gallego & Ciro Guerra’s BIRDS OF PASSAGE, opening film of Directors’ Fortnight.

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“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady