By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

KEANU REEVES AND ALEX WINTER REUNITE FOR HIGHLY ANTICIPATED THIRD INSTALLMENT “BILL & TED FACE THE MUSIC” DIRECTED BY DEAN PARISOT 

 

BLOOM to Introduce to international Buyers in Cannes; MGM’s Orion Pictures to release in the US

 

Los Angeles, CA (May 8, 2018) – BLOOM announced today that Keanu Reeves (John Wick, The Matrix) and Alex Winter (Deep Web; Downloaded) will officially be reuniting on screen after 27 years as the legendary Ted “Theodore” Logan (Reeves) and Bill S. Preston Esq. (Winter) in the highly anticipated third installment of the Bill & Ted comedy, Bill & Ted Face the Music.Following Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure and Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey, original creators Chris Matheson (Imagine That) and Ed Solomon (Men in Black, Mosaic, Now You See Me) have penned the script, with Dean Parisot (Galaxy Quest, Red 2, Fun with Dick and Jane) confirmed to direct. Scott Kroopf (Limitless) will produce together with Alex Lebovici and Steve Ponce of Hammerstone Studios, with Steven Soderbergh serving as an executive producer alongside Scott Fischer, John Ryan Jr., and John Santilli.

MGM owns the rights to the film and will release in the U.S. under their Orion Pictures banner. BLOOM is handling international sales, which commenced in Cannes this week. Endeavor Content negotiated the deal.

When we last met Bill and Ted they were time-traveling teenagers trying to pass history class and win the battle of the bands. Once prophesized to save the universe with their rock and roll, middle age and the responsibilities of family have caught up with these two best friends who have not yet fulfilled their destiny. They’ve written thousands of tunes, but they have yet to write a good one, much less the greatest song ever written. With the fabric of time and space tearing around them, a visitor from the future warns our heroes that only their song can save life as we know it. Out of luck and fresh out of inspiration, Bill and Ted set out on a time travel adventure to seek the song that will set their world right and bring harmony in the universe as we know it. Together with the aid of their daughters, a new crop of historical figures, and some sympathetic music legends, Bill and Ted find much, much more than just a song. The film is currently in pre-production.

BLOOM’s Alex Walton said: “Fans of Bill and Ted have been waiting for Reeves and Winter to reunite since their last Bogus Journey in 1991. This is excellent! ”

Alex and Keanu added “We couldn’t be more excited to get the whole band back together again. Chris and Ed wrote an amazing script, and with Dean at the helm we’ve got a dream team!”

Reeves has an impressive slate including the successful John Wick trilogy for Lionsgate. He’s currently in production on the third installment of John Wick: Chapter 3, which will be released in May 2019 and will star alongside Winona Ryder in Destination Wedding, which BLOOM is also selling internationally.  Other notable credits include: Matrix Trilogy, Point Break, Speed, Constantine and Devil’s Advocate.

 

Winter and Reeves starred together in the first two Bill and Ted installments. Winter also starred in The Lost Boys and since has transitioned to a writer and director as well with credits including the Epix documentary Deep Web and VH1 documentary Downloaded. Recently, he directed and produced two short documentary films for Laura Poitras’s Field of Vision; Relatively Free and Trump’s Lobby, and up next has Zappa, the first all-access documentary on the life and times of Frank Zappa.

Parisot won an Academy Award® for his short live-action film The Appointments of Dennis Jennings and is known for projects including Galaxy Quest, RED 2 and Fun with Dick and Jane.

Reeves is represented by WME and Ziffren Brittenham; Winter is represented by CAA, Forward Entertainment, Hollander Entertainment and Sloss Eckhouse LawCo; Parisot is represented by WME; and Hammerstone Studios is represented by Rosen Law Group.

In Cannes, BLOOM will also be selling Julius Onah’s Luce starring Naomi Watts, Octavia Spencer, Tim Roth and Kelvin Harrison Jr.Yuval Adler’s The Operative; Josh Trank’s Fonzo starring Tom Hardy; David Sandberg’s Kung Fury starring Michael FassbenderSam Levinson’s Assassination Nation, and Matthew Heineman’s A Private War starring Rosamund Pike.

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About BLOOM

BLOOM is a sales, production and financing outfit. The company represents and curates a diversified slate of films ranging from commercial, talent-driven, wide release movies, to specialty films from proven and trusted filmmakers, all the while keeping an eye towards fresh and emerging talent.

BLOOM’s slate also includes: Bill Holderman’s Book Club starring Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, and Candice Bergen, which releases in May; Josh Trank’s Al Capone bio-pic Fo, nzo starring Tom Hardy; Scott Cooper’s Hostiles which is currently in theaters and starring Christian Bale, Rosamund Pike and Wes Studi; Paul Weitz’s Bel Canto starring Julianne Moore; Jake Scott’s The Burning Woman, starring Christina Hendricks and Sienna Miller; Zhang Yimou’s Shadow; Craig S. Zahler’s Dragged Across Concrete starring Mel Gibson and Vince Vaughn which will be released by Lionsgate; Strangers: Prey at Night from Johannes Roberts; Andrea Di Stefano’s Three Seconds, starring Joel Kinnaman, Rosamund Pike, Common, and Clive Owen; and Victor Levin’s Destination Wedding starring Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder. In 2017, BLOOM was acquired by Endeavor Content (formerly WME | IMG).

 

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