By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

“Since it entered the movie business, Netflix has been on a collision course with the film-distribution establishment. This Cannes dispute is the biggest front in what will be an ongoing war; the question may be which side will lose more. Cannes confers automatic prestige on its entrants, and Netflix could find it harder to attract the kind of big-name directors it likes to work with if it can’t guarantee access at top festivals. Cuarón, Greengrass and Saulnier are among those who are seeing their movies pulled from competition. Orson Welles’ The Other Side of the Wind wasn’t affected by the rules change but is being kept away from Cannes anyway.”

“Since it entered the movie business, Netflix has been on a collision course with the film-distribution establishment. This Cannes dispute is the biggest front in what will be an ongoing war; the question may be which side will lose more. Cannes confers automatic prestige on its entrants, and Netflix could find it harder to attract the kind of big-name directors it likes to work with if it can’t guarantee access at top festivals. Cuarón, Greengrass and Saulnier are among those who are seeing their movies pulled from competition. Orson Welles’ The Other Side of the Wind wasn’t affected by the rules change but is being kept away from Cannes anyway.”

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“Yes, yes, yes. Now I am also the producer on Jean-Luc’s films, so I need to raise the money. Yes, there are two projects in preparation with the pretext of virtual reality. We are beginning with two approaches: we can either do or undo VR. Maybe we will undo it more than we do VR, because thinking about VR leads to the opposite of VR. Is there concrete imagination in virtual reality? For me, cinema is concrete imagination because it’s made with the real and uses it. VR, virtual reality, is totally the opposite of that, but it might be interesting to use this and then to destroy it. No, we’ll see, we’ll see. First, it’s just an idea of a beginning. There is a forest to cross, and we are just at the beginning of the forest. The first step is development. As they say in business, first there is development and research. We have to develop somehow an idea for the film; I won’t say a script, but to see what we can do with this system, and what we can undo with this system.”
~ Fabrice Aragno On Godard’s Next Projects

“Why put it in a box? This is the number one problem I have—by the way it’s a fair question, I’m not saying that—with this kind of festival situation is that there’s always this temptation to classify the movie immediately and if you look at it—and I’ve tried to warn my fellow jurors of this—directors and movie critics are the worst people to judge movies! Directors are always thinking, “I could do that.” Critics are always saying, “This part of the movie is like the 1947 version and this part…” And it’s like, “Fuck! Just watch the movie and try and absorb it and not compare it to some other fucking movie and put it in a box!” So I think the answer’s both and maybe neither, I don’t know. That’s for you to see and criticize me for or not.”
~ James Gray